Special Issue "Metallic Nanostructures"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Salomon Adi

Bar Ilan Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Ramat Gan, Israel
Website | E-Mail
Interests: imaging; metallic nano-structures; photo-catalysis; energy transfer processes; Second Harmonic generations; color generators; surface plasmons; renewable energy materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With recent advances in nanotechnology, fabrication and characterization of metallic nanostructures have attracted a great deal of attention.  By structuring metallic surfaces at the sub-micron scale, light is coupled to surface plasmons and can be confined to a deep sub-wavelength volume. As a result, both linear and nonlinear optical responses are highly enhanced, enabling high-resolution detection. The ability to design state-of-the-art metallic nanostructures gives rise to fundamental optical phenomena at the nano-scale and to development of a wide range of optical devices for (bio)-imaging and sensing.

This Special Issue on "Metallic Nanostructures" attempts to cover recent advances in the fabrication of metallic nanostructures and characterization techniques, especially techniques related to electronic microscopies. Their applications in color generations, imaging, and sensing will be covered as well.

Dr. Salomon Adi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fabrication techniques
  • nano-imaging
  • optical sensing
  • metallic nano- structures
  • cathodoluminescence
  • EELS
  • SHG
  • color generators

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication Distinguishable Plasmonic Nanoparticle and Gap Mode Properties in a Silver Nanoparticle on a Gold Film System Using Three-Dimensional FDTD Simulations
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080582
Received: 9 June 2018 / Revised: 13 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 30 July 2018
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Abstract
We present a computational study of the near-field enhancement properties from a plasmonic nanomaterial based on a silver nanoparticle on a gold film. Our simulation studies show a clear distinguishability between nanoparticle mode and gap mode as a function of dielectric layer thickness.
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We present a computational study of the near-field enhancement properties from a plasmonic nanomaterial based on a silver nanoparticle on a gold film. Our simulation studies show a clear distinguishability between nanoparticle mode and gap mode as a function of dielectric layer thickness. The observed nanoparticle mode is independent of dielectric layer thickness, and hence its related plasmonic properties can be investigated clearly by having a minimum of ~10-nm-thick dielectric layer on a metallic film. In case of the gap mode, the presence of minimal dielectric layer thickness is crucial (~≤4 nm), as deterioration starts rapidly thereafter. The proposed simple tunable gap-based particle on film design might open interesting studies in the field of plasmonics, extreme light confinement, sensing, and source enhancement of an emitter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Nanostructures)
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Open AccessArticle Nanostrip-Induced High Tunability Multipolar Fano Resonances in a Au Ring-Strip Nanosystem
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 568; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080568
Received: 26 June 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
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Abstract
Surface plasmon resonances of a Au ring-strip nanosystem with tunable multipolar Fano resonances have been investigated based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Abundant plasmon properties of a Au ring-strip nanosystem can be obtained on the basis of the unique electronic properties of
[...] Read more.
Surface plasmon resonances of a Au ring-strip nanosystem with tunable multipolar Fano resonances have been investigated based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Abundant plasmon properties of a Au ring-strip nanosystem can be obtained on the basis of the unique electronic properties of different geometry parameters. In our research models, these multipolar Fano resonances are induced and can be tuned independently by changing the geometry parameters of the Au ring-strip nanosystem. Complex electric field distributions excited by the Au ring-strip nanosystem provide possibility to form dark plasmonic modes. Multipolar Fano resonances display strong light extinction in the Au ring-strip nanosystem, which can offer a new approach for an optical tunable filter, optical switching, and advanced biosensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Nanostructures)
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Open AccessArticle A Thin Film Flexible Supercapacitor Based on Oblique Angle Deposited Ni/NiO Nanowire Arrays
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060422
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 9 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
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Abstract
With high power density, fast charging-discharging speed, and a long cycling life, supercapacitors are a kind of highly developed novel energy-storage device that has shown a growing performance and various unconventional shapes such as flexible, linear-type, stretchable, self-healing, etc. Here, we proposed a
[...] Read more.
With high power density, fast charging-discharging speed, and a long cycling life, supercapacitors are a kind of highly developed novel energy-storage device that has shown a growing performance and various unconventional shapes such as flexible, linear-type, stretchable, self-healing, etc. Here, we proposed a rational design of thin film, flexible micro-supercapacitors with in-plane interdigital electrodes, where the electrodes were fabricated using the oblique angle deposition technique to grow oblique Ni/NiO nanowire arrays directly on polyimide film. The obtained electrodes have a high specific surface area and good adhesion to the substrate compared with other in-plane micro-supercapacitors. Meanwhile, the as-fabricated micro-supercapacitors have good flexibility and satisfactory energy-storage performance, exhibiting a high specific capacity of 37.1 F/cm3, a high energy density of 5.14 mWh/cm3, a power density of up to 0.5 W/cm3, and good stability during charge-discharge cycles and repeated bending-recovery cycles, respectively. Our micro-supercapacitors can be used as ingenious energy storage devices for future portable and wearable electronic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Nanostructures)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Polarization- and Angular-Resolved Optical Response of Molecules on Anisotropic Plasmonic Nanostructures
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060418
Received: 10 May 2018 / Revised: 28 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 June 2018 / Published: 9 June 2018
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Abstract
A sometimes overlooked degree of freedom in the design of many spectroscopic (mainly Raman) experiments involve the choice of experimental geometry and polarization arrangement used. Although these aspects usually play a rather minor role, their neglect may result in a misinterpretation of the
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A sometimes overlooked degree of freedom in the design of many spectroscopic (mainly Raman) experiments involve the choice of experimental geometry and polarization arrangement used. Although these aspects usually play a rather minor role, their neglect may result in a misinterpretation of the experimental results. It is well known that polarization- and/or angular- resolved spectroscopic experiments allow one to classify the symmetry of the vibrations involved or the molecular orientation with respect to a smooth surface. However, very low detection limits in surface-enhancing spectroscopic techniques are often accompanied by a complete or partial loss of this detailed information. In this review, we will try to elucidate the extent to which this approach can be generalized for molecules adsorbed on plasmonic nanostructures. We will provide a detailed summary of the state-of-the-art experimental findings for a range of plasmonic platforms used in the last ~ 15 years. Possible implications on the design of plasmon-based molecular sensors for maximum signal enhancement will also be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Nanostructures)
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