Special Issue "Recent Advances in Nanomaterials’ Research: Selection from ICSSP'15"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Shahzad Naseem

Centre of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yan-Jun Guo

National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, No. 11, Beiyitiao Zhongguangcun, Beijing, 100190, China
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Saira Riaz

Centre of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Paulo de Morais

Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasil
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Condensed matter physics has two very well established sub-fields, i.e., semiconductor physics and magnetism. These sub-fields are continuously revealing new phenomena and materials, especially in the nano-regime. In semiconductors, defects, charge carriers, and impurity atoms strongly affect different properties. As far as magnetism is concerned, it is a collective electronic phenomenon, which strongly depends on the presence of a stable ordered state, even at high temperatures. The presence of magnetic order itself has a large impact on the different properties of semiconductors—most importantly, transport properties. Most recently, many important technologies have developed in order to exploit information processing and storage in semiconductor and magnetic materials, respectively. Semiconductor spintronics deals with the development of new devices, which are hybrids and manipulate information processing, communication, and storage simultaneously. This Special Issue will be open for interested authors to submit their manuscripts to Nanomaterials, for their potential application in advanced technology/devices. It would also cover the best papers from the International Conference on Solid State Physics (ICSSP’15) http://icssp15.org.pk, which will be held on 13–17 December, 2015. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

•          Semiconducting Nanomaterials
•          Nanofibers
•          Nanoparticles, Nanowires, and Nanotubes
•          DMS (Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor) Nanomaterails
•          Carbon Nanomaterials
•          Nano Ceramics

Prof. Dr. Shahzad Naseem
Prof. Dr. Bin Zhu
Prof. Dr. Yan-Jun Guo
Prof. Dr. Saira Riaz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

semiconducting nanomaterials nanofibers nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes DMS (diluted magnetic semiconductor) nanomaterails carbon nanomaterials nano ceramics

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Synergistic Effect of Functionalized Nanokaolin Decorated MWCNTs on the Performance of Cellulose Acetate (CA) Membranes Spectacular
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(4), 79; doi:10.3390/nano6040079
Received: 26 December 2015 / Revised: 22 March 2016 / Accepted: 30 March 2016 / Published: 21 April 2016
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Abstract
In order to enhance salt rejection level and high pressure mechanical integrity, functionalized nanokaolin decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes (FNKM, 0–5 wt % loading) were incorporated into a cellulose acetate (CA) matrix using high temperature solution mixing methodology. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction
[...] Read more.
In order to enhance salt rejection level and high pressure mechanical integrity, functionalized nanokaolin decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes (FNKM, 0–5 wt % loading) were incorporated into a cellulose acetate (CA) matrix using high temperature solution mixing methodology. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction technique (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) were used to characterize the prepared membranes. The obtained results revealed that with increasing FNKM concentration in the host polymeric matrix, composite membrane’s structural, functional, thermal, water permeation/flux and salt rejection characteristics were also modified accordingly. Percent enhancement in salt rejection was increased around threefold by adding 5 wt % FNKM in CA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Nanomaterials’ Research: Selection from ICSSP'15)
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Open AccessArticle Temperature-Dependent Magnetic Response of Antiferromagnetic Doping in Cobalt Ferrite Nanostructures
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(4), 73; doi:10.3390/nano6040073
Received: 22 December 2015 / Revised: 7 March 2016 / Accepted: 11 March 2016 / Published: 18 April 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3421 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work MnxCo1−xFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. Phase purity and structural analyses of synthesized NPs were performed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals the presence of
[...] Read more.
In this work MnxCo1−xFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. Phase purity and structural analyses of synthesized NPs were performed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals the presence of highly crystalline and narrowly-dispersed NPs with average diameter of 14 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum was measured in the range of 400–4000 cm−1 which confirmed the formation of vibrational frequency bands associated with the entire spinel structure. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties in anti-ferromagnet (AFM) and ferromagnet (FM) structure were investigated with the aid of a physical property measurement system (PPMS). It was observed that magnetic interactions between the AFM (Mn) and FM (CoFe2O4) material arise below the Neel temperature of the dopant. Furthermore, hysteresis response was clearly pronounced for the enhancement in magnetic parameters by varying temperature towards absolute zero. It is shown that magnetic properties have been tuned as a function of temperature and an externally-applied field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Nanomaterials’ Research: Selection from ICSSP'15)
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Open AccessArticle Size- and Shape-Dependent Antibacterial Studies of Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by Wet Chemical Routes
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(4), 74; doi:10.3390/nano6040074
Received: 5 January 2016 / Revised: 19 February 2016 / Accepted: 2 March 2016 / Published: 15 April 2016
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (3987 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of different shapes and sizes were prepared by solution-based chemical reduction routes. Silver nitrate was used as a precursor, tri-sodium citrate (TSC) and sodium borohydride as reducing agents, while polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was used as a stabilizing agent. The morphology, size,
[...] Read more.
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of different shapes and sizes were prepared by solution-based chemical reduction routes. Silver nitrate was used as a precursor, tri-sodium citrate (TSC) and sodium borohydride as reducing agents, while polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was used as a stabilizing agent. The morphology, size, and structural properties of obtained nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Spherical AgNPs, as depicted by SEM, were found to have diameters in the range of 15 to 90 nm while lengths of the edges of the triangular particles were about 150 nm. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks of different spherical silver colloids occurring in the wavelength range of 397 to 504 nm, whereas triangular particles showed two peaks, first at 392 nm and second at 789 nm as measured by UV-VIS. The XRD spectra of the prepared samples indicated the face-centered cubic crystalline structure of metallic AgNPs. The in vitro antibacterial properties of all synthesized AgNPs against two types of Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were examined by Kirby–Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility method. It was noticed that the smallest-sized spherical AgNPs demonstrated a better antibacterial activity against both bacterial strains as compared to the triangular and larger spherical shaped AgNPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Nanomaterials’ Research: Selection from ICSSP'15)
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Open AccessArticle Structural and Magnetic Response in Bimetallic Core/Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(4), 72; doi:10.3390/nano6040072
Received: 22 December 2015 / Revised: 30 January 2016 / Accepted: 5 February 2016 / Published: 14 April 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1410 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-textRetraction
Abstract
Bimagnetic monodisperse CoFe2O4/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles have been prepared by solution evaporation route. To demonstrate preferential coating of iron oxide onto the surface of ferrite nanoparticles X-ray diffraction (XRD), High resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and Raman
[...] Read more.
Bimagnetic monodisperse CoFe2O4/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles have been prepared by solution evaporation route. To demonstrate preferential coating of iron oxide onto the surface of ferrite nanoparticles X-ray diffraction (XRD), High resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. XRD analysis using Rietveld refinement technique confirms single phase nanoparticles with average seed size of about 18 nm and thickness of shell is 3 nm, which corroborates with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Low temperature magnetic hysteresis loops showed interesting behavior. We have observed large coercivity 15.8 kOe at T = 5 K, whereas maximum saturation magnetization (125 emu/g) is attained at T = 100 K for CoFe2O4/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles. Saturation magnetization decreases due to structural distortions at the surface of shell below 100 K. Zero field cooled (ZFC) and Field cooled (FC) plots show that synthesized nanoparticles are ferromagnetic till room temperature and it has been noticed that core/shell sample possess high blocking temperature than Cobalt Ferrite. Results indicate that presence of iron oxide shell significantly increases magnetic parameters as compared to the simple cobalt ferrite. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Nanomaterials’ Research: Selection from ICSSP'15)
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Open AccessArticle Gold Nanoparticles: An Efficient Antimicrobial Agent against Enteric Bacterial Human Pathogen
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(4), 71; doi:10.3390/nano6040071
Received: 13 December 2015 / Revised: 29 January 2016 / Accepted: 24 February 2016 / Published: 14 April 2016
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (3198 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Enteric bacterial human pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, are the major cause of diarrheal infections in children and adults. Their structure badly affects the human immune system. It is important to explore new antibacterial agents instead
[...] Read more.
Enteric bacterial human pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, are the major cause of diarrheal infections in children and adults. Their structure badly affects the human immune system. It is important to explore new antibacterial agents instead of antibiotics for treatment. This project is an attempt to explain how gold nanoparticles affect these bacteria. We investigated the important role of the mean particle size, and the inhibition of a bacterium is dose-dependent. Ultra Violet (UV)-visible spectroscopy revealed the size of chemically synthesized gold nanoparticle as 6–40 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis confirmed the size and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) analysis determined the polycrystalline nature of gold nanoparticles. The present findings explained how gold nanoparticles lyse Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Nanomaterials’ Research: Selection from ICSSP'15)
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