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Special Issue "Supramolecular Chemistry and Self-Assembly: Themed Issue in Honor of Professor Itamar Willner on the Occasion of His 70th Birthday"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ranjit T. Koodali

Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, 414 E. Clark Street, Vermillion SD 57069, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mesoporous materials; solar energy conversion; photocatalysis; environmental remediation; sol-gel chemistry; nanobiotechnology
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Daniel Mandler

Institute of Chemistry, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 9190401, Israel
Website | E-Mail
Interests: electrochemistry; functional coatings; self-assembled monolayers; analytical electrochemistry; sol-gel technology; medical implants; forensic science; imprinting; nanoelectrochemsitry
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Fernando Patolsky

School of Chemistry, the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bioelectronics; nanoelectronics; nanomaterials; sensors and biosensors; medical diagnosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Supramolecular chemistry and self-assembly have long been recognized as major pillars in understanding the organization of chemical and biological components that are beyond molecules. Although the first contributions to supramolecular chemistry were made by well-known scientists, such as Fischer in the 19th century, it took almost another century until the first artificial systems were synthesized by Pedersen, Cram and Lehn. Since then, the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and self-assembly have become the bread and butter of the scientific community dealing with the organization of monolayers, thin films and biologically inspired complex systems. These concepts, which drive the organization and activity of many biological systems, have been studied experimentally and theoretically, and have paved their implementation in numerous applications, ranging from sensing to responsive materials actuators, and many more.

Our journal is pleased to publish a themed issue in honor of Professor Itamar Willner for his outstanding research contributions in the fields of “Supramolecular Chemistry and Self-Assembly”.

Professor Itamar Willner, from the Institute of Chemistry at the Hebrew University, is undoubtedly one of the leading chemists in Israel and around the world. He graduated at the Hebrew University, and carried out his post-doctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley, with Melvin Calvin (who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1961). He joined the Hebrew University in 1981, where he was appointed Professor in 1986.

Professor Willner is the author or more than 730 publications, with more than 48,000 citations, and an h-index of 117. He serves as the head of the sciences division of the Israeli Academy of Science, and was also nominated to the German National of Academy of Science and the European Academy of Sciences and Arts. He has received a remarkable number of awards, among them the Israel Prize (which is the highest prize awarded by the Israeli Government), the Max- Planck Research Award for International Cooperation, the Israel Chemical Society Award, the Rothschild Prize and the EMET Prize.

His research interests embrace bioelectronics, biomolecule-based nanocircuitry and nanostructures, biomolecule-inorganic nanostructures, DNA machines for biosensing, biomolecule-based computing, biomolecular photonics, molecular switches and motors and functional polymers. Yet, he has contributed significantly to many more areas, such as energy conversion and storage, nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology. In his outstanding research, Professor Willner very successfully combines organic synthesis with the principles of supramolecular chemistry, self-assembly, and a wide variety of biological components spanning from enzymes to antigens and nucleic acids.

Professor Willner had a very large number of graduate and post-doctoral students, many of whom are currently holding academic positions in Israel and around the world.

Prof. Dr. Ranjit T. Koodali
Prof. Dr. Daniel Mandler
Prof. Dr. Fernando Patolsky
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

supramolecular chemistry; self-assembly; self-organization; imprinting; sensing; Biosystems; bioelectronics; nanostructures; nanomotors; thin films

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Recent Progress in Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors for Cancer Biomarkers: A Review
Molecules 2017, 22(7), 1048; doi:10.3390/molecules22071048
Received: 1 June 2017 / Revised: 21 June 2017 / Accepted: 22 June 2017 / Published: 24 June 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (3587 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article reviews recent progress in the development of nanomaterial-based electrochemical biosensors for cancer biomarkers. Because of their high electrical conductivity, high affinity to biomolecules, and high surface area-to-weight ratios, nanomaterials, including metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have been used for fabricating
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This article reviews recent progress in the development of nanomaterial-based electrochemical biosensors for cancer biomarkers. Because of their high electrical conductivity, high affinity to biomolecules, and high surface area-to-weight ratios, nanomaterials, including metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have been used for fabricating electrochemical biosensors. Electrodes are often coated with nanomaterials to increase the effective surface area of the electrodes and immobilize a large number of biomolecules such as enzymes and antibodies. Alternatively, nanomaterials are used as signaling labels for increasing the output signals of cancer biomarker sensors, in which nanomaterials are conjugated with secondary antibodies and redox compounds. According to this strategy, a variety of biosensors have been developed for detecting cancer biomarkers. Recent studies show that using nanomaterials is highly advantageous in preparing high-performance biosensors for detecting lower levels of cancer biomarkers. This review focuses mainly on the protocols for using nanomaterials to construct cancer biomarker sensors and the performance characteristics of the sensors. Recent trends in the development of cancer biomarker sensors are discussed according to the nanomaterials used. Full article
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Open AccessReview Porous Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks
Molecules 2017, 22(2), 266; doi:10.3390/molecules22020266
Received: 10 January 2017 / Revised: 4 February 2017 / Accepted: 6 February 2017 / Published: 13 February 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (11873 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ordered porous solid-state architectures constructed via non-covalent supramolecular self-assembly have attracted increasing interest due to their unique advantages and potential applications. Porous metal-coordination organic frameworks (MOFs) are generated by the assembly of metal coordination centers and organic linkers. Compared to MOFs, porous hydrogen-bonded
[...] Read more.
Ordered porous solid-state architectures constructed via non-covalent supramolecular self-assembly have attracted increasing interest due to their unique advantages and potential applications. Porous metal-coordination organic frameworks (MOFs) are generated by the assembly of metal coordination centers and organic linkers. Compared to MOFs, porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) are readily purified and recovered via simple recrystallization. However, due to lacking of sufficiently ability to orientate self-aggregation of building motifs in predictable manners, rational design and preparation of porous HOFs are still challenging. Herein, we summarize recent developments about porous HOFs and attempt to gain deeper insights into the design strategies of basic building motifs. Full article
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