E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Nanobiostructures: Commemorative Issue in Honor of Professor Serban Solacolu (1905-1980) - Founder of the Romanian School of Oxide Materials Science and Engineering"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Ecaterina Andronescu

Department of Science and Engineereing of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Politehnica University of Bucharest, RO-011061, Bucharest, Romania
E-Mail
Interests: synthesis and characterization of nano and biomaterials
Guest Editor
Dr. Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu

Department of Science and Engineereing of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Politehnica University of Bucharest, RO-011061, Bucharest, Romania
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis and characterization of nanobiomaterials, pharmaceutical nanotechnology, drug targeting; drug delivery; anti-biofilm surfaces; nanomodified surfaces; thin films; natural products

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As you are aware, nowadays, nanobiostructures are in a rapid development, many of them being developed for, or involved in, the treatment/diagnosis of different diseases. The aim of this commemorative special issue of Molecules in honor of Professor Șerban Solacolu is to bring together most attractive and novel applications and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of recently developed nanobiomaterials. Additionally, a comprehensive overview regarding the synthesis, physico-chemical characterization, and most-recently developed biomedical applications will be approached.

Professor Șerban Solacolu was the founder of the Romanian School of Oxide Materials and Engineering. He received his PhD at the prestigious Charlottenburg Polytechnic School, Berlin, in 1933. His thesis was developed under the leadership of eminent professors, such as W. Eitel and H. Kuhl. His thesis research approached a new domain for that time, Thermal phase equilibrium applied to Portland cement. The doctoral thesis entitled "Application of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 Rankin diagram for burning cement practice" was assessed with "Magna cum laude superato".

 

Special Issue

Scheme 1. Thermal phase equilibrium diagrams developed by Professor Șerban Solacolu

Thesis coordinator Professor Hans Kuhl, in July 20, 1932, wrote about the researcher Șerban Solacolu: "Doctor Șerban Solacolu dedicated himself to the study, proving a high energy and an unusual work capacity; he showed, by solving the emergencies of difficult scientific problems, a particular originality and an especially unusual power of thought for solving his research. Due to various scientific activity at the Institute, but also because we have been working together over the past few years, the doctor Șerban Solacolu had also became a valued collaborator to me and I look back to his parting from my Institute with a living regret. May my best wishes accompany him on his way in life."

This Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following areas: bioceramics, nanoparticles, hybrid materials, nanocomposites, scaffolds, biomimetic nanomaterials with bioapplications, such as drug delivery and targeting, antimicrobials, cancer therapy, medical imaging, dentistry, tissue engineering, galenic formulations, and cosmetics.

Considering the great interest regarding the development of nanobiostructures for treatment of diseases, this Special Issue is expected to have an important scientific and applicative contribution especially on the biomedical field.

Prof. Ecaterina Andronescu
Dr. Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioceramics
  • nanoparticles
  • hybrid materials
  • nanocomposites
  • scaffolds
  • biomimetic nanomaterials
  • drug delivery and targeting
  • antimicrobials
  • cancer therapy
  • medical imaging
  • dentistry
  • tissue engineering
  • galenic formulations
  • cosmetics

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Fabrication and Cytotoxicity of Gemcitabine-Functionalized Magnetite Nanoparticles
Molecules 2017, 22(7), 1080; doi:10.3390/molecules22071080
Received: 30 April 2017 / Revised: 10 June 2017 / Accepted: 21 June 2017 / Published: 28 June 2017
PDF Full-text (23484 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanotechnology has been successfully used for the fabrication of targeted anti-cancer drug carriers. This study aimed to obtain Fe3O4nanoparticles functionalized with Gemcitabine to improve the cytotoxic effects of the chemotherapeutic substance on cancer cells. The (un) functionalized magnetite nanoparticles
[...] Read more.
Nanotechnology has been successfully used for the fabrication of targeted anti-cancer drug carriers. This study aimed to obtain Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with Gemcitabine to improve the cytotoxic effects of the chemotherapeutic substance on cancer cells. The (un) functionalized magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using a modified co-precipitation method. The nanoconjugate characterization was performed by XRD, SEM, SAED and HRTEM; the functionalizing of magnetite with anti-tumor substances has been highlighted through TGA. The interaction with biologic media has been studied by means of stability and agglomeration tendency (using DLS and Zeta Potential); also, the release kinetics of the drug in culture media was evaluated. Cytotoxicity of free-Gemcitabine and the obtained nanoconjugate were evaluated on human BT 474 breast ductal carcinoma, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma and MG 63 osteosarcoma cells by MTS. In parallel, cellular morphology of these cells were examined through fluorescence microscopy and SEM. The localization of the nanoparticles related to the cells was studied using SEM, EDX and TEM. Hemolysis assay showed no damage of erythrocytes. Additionally, an in vivo biodistribution study was made for tracking where Fe3O4@Gemcitabine traveled in the body of mice. Our results showed that the transport of the drug improves the cytotoxic effects in comparison with the one produced by free Gemcitabine for the BT474 and HepG2 cells. The in vivo biodistribution test proved nanoparticle accumulation in the vital organs, with the exception of spleen, where black-brown deposits have been found. These results indicate that our Gemcitabine-functionalized nanoparticles are a promising targeted system for applications in cancer therapy. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Formation and Physiochemical Properties of Silver Nanoparticles with Various Exopolysaccharides of a Medicinal Fungus in Aqueous Solution
Molecules 2017, 22(1), 50; doi:10.3390/molecules22010050
Received: 25 October 2016 / Revised: 17 December 2016 / Accepted: 19 December 2016 / Published: 29 December 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4596 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Natural polysaccharides are the most widely used biopolymers for green synthesis of eco-friendly silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). In a previous study, a high molecular weight (MW) fraction of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by a medicinal fungus Cs-HK1 has been shown useful for green and facile
[...] Read more.
Natural polysaccharides are the most widely used biopolymers for green synthesis of eco-friendly silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). In a previous study, a high molecular weight (MW) fraction of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by a medicinal fungus Cs-HK1 has been shown useful for green and facile synthesis of AgNPs in water. This study was to further evaluate the effects of molecular properties of EPS on the formation, stability and properties of AgNPs with different EPS fractions at various pH conditions. Three EPS fractions (P0.5, P2.0 and P5.0: MW high to low and protein content low to high) were reacted with silver nitrate at various pH 3.0–8.0 in water. The most favorable pH range was 5.5–8.0 for the formation and stable dispersion of AgNPs. At a given pH, the maximum amount of AgNPs was produced with P5.0, and the minimum with P0.5. The shape, size and physiochemical properties of AgNPs were strongly affected by the molecular characteristics of EPS (MW and conformation). The results may be helpful for understanding the factors and mechanisms for formation of stable AgNPs with natural polysaccharides and the interactions between AgNPs and the polysaccharide hydrocolloids in water. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Truncation Derivatives of the S-Layer Protein of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 (SslA): Towards Elucidation of the Protein Domain Responsible for Self-Assembly
Molecules 2016, 21(9), 1117; doi:10.3390/molecules21091117
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 12 August 2016 / Accepted: 19 August 2016 / Published: 24 August 2016
PDF Full-text (3744 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The cell surface of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 is covered by an S-layer (SslA) consisting of identical protein subunits that assemble into lattices exhibiting square symmetry. In this work the self-assembly properties of the recombinant SslA were characterised with an emphasis on the
[...] Read more.
The cell surface of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 is covered by an S-layer (SslA) consisting of identical protein subunits that assemble into lattices exhibiting square symmetry. In this work the self-assembly properties of the recombinant SslA were characterised with an emphasis on the identification of protein regions responsible for self-assembly. To this end, recombinant mature SslA (aa 31-1097) and three SslA truncation derivatives (one N-terminal, one C-terminal and one CN-terminal) were produced in a heterologous expression system, isolated, purified and their properties analysed by in vitro recrystallisation experiments on a functionalised silicon wafer. As a result, recombinant mature SslA self-assembled into crystalline monolayers with lattices resembling the one of the wild-type SslA. The study identifies the central protein domain consisting of amino acids 341-925 self-sufficient for self-assembly. Neither the first 341 amino acids nor the last 172 amino acids of the protein sequence are required to self-assemble into lattices. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Preparation of Hydrochlorothiazide Nanoparticles for Solubility Enhancement
Molecules 2016, 21(8), 1005; doi:10.3390/molecules21081005
Received: 1 June 2016 / Revised: 25 July 2016 / Accepted: 29 July 2016 / Published: 2 August 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2851 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanoparticles can be considered as a useful tool for improving properties of poorly soluble active ingredients. Hydrochlorothiazide (Class IV of the Biopharmaceutical Classification System) was chosen as a model compound. Antisolvent precipitation-solvent evaporation and emulsion solvent evaporation methods were used for preparation of
[...] Read more.
Nanoparticles can be considered as a useful tool for improving properties of poorly soluble active ingredients. Hydrochlorothiazide (Class IV of the Biopharmaceutical Classification System) was chosen as a model compound. Antisolvent precipitation-solvent evaporation and emulsion solvent evaporation methods were used for preparation of 18 samples containing hydrochlorothiazide nanoparticles. Water solutions of surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate, Tween 80 and carboxymethyl dextran were used in mass concentrations of 1%, 3% and 5%. Acetone and dichloromethane were used as solvents of the model compound. The particle size of the prepared samples was measured by dynamic light scattering. The selected sample of hydrochlorothiazide nanoparticles stabilized with carboxymethyl dextran sodium salt with particle size 2.6 nm was characterized additionally by Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the solubility of this sample was 6.5-fold higher than that of bulk hydrochlorothiazide. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Advanced Nanobiomaterials: Vaccines, Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases
Molecules 2016, 21(7), 867; doi:10.3390/molecules21070867
Received: 25 May 2016 / Revised: 21 June 2016 / Accepted: 25 June 2016 / Published: 1 July 2016
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (617 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of nanoparticles has contributed to many advances due to their important properties such as, size, shape or biocompatibility. The use of nanotechnology in medicine has great potential, especially in medical microbiology. Promising data show the possibility of shaping immune responses and
[...] Read more.
The use of nanoparticles has contributed to many advances due to their important properties such as, size, shape or biocompatibility. The use of nanotechnology in medicine has great potential, especially in medical microbiology. Promising data show the possibility of shaping immune responses and fighting severe infections using synthetic materials. Different studies have suggested that the addition of synthetic nanoparticles in vaccines and immunotherapy will have a great impact on public health. On the other hand, antibiotic resistance is one of the major concerns worldwide; a recent report of the World Health Organization (WHO) states that antibiotic resistance could cause 300 million deaths by 2050. Nanomedicine offers an innovative tool for combating the high rates of resistance that we are fighting nowadays, by the development of both alternative therapeutic and prophylaxis approaches and also novel diagnosis methods. Early detection of infectious diseases is the key to a successful treatment and the new developed applications based on nanotechnology offer an increased sensibility and efficiency of the diagnosis. The aim of this review is to reveal and discuss the main advances made on the science of nanomaterials for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Highlighting innovative approaches utilized to: (i) increasing the efficiency of vaccines; (ii) obtaining shuttle systems that require lower antibiotic concentrations; (iii) developing coating devices that inhibit microbial colonization and biofilm formation. Full article
Figures

Back to Top