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A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Organic Synthesis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Julio A. Seijas Vázquez

Departamento de Química Orgánica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Facultad de Ciencias-Campus de Lugo, Alfonso X el Sabio, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34 982824062
Fax: +34 982 285 872
Interests: synthesis of compounds with biologic activity; synthesis of compounds with interest for agro-food field; solation, estructural determination and synthesis of natural products; microwave organic reactions enhancement

Published Papers (21 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle One-Pot and Efficient Synthesis of Triazolo[1,2-a]indazole-triones via Reaction of Arylaldehydes with Urazole and Dimedone Catalyzed by Silica Nanoparticles Prepared from Rice Husk
Molecules 2011, 16(11), 9041-9048; doi:10.3390/molecules16119041
Received: 19 September 2011 / Revised: 13 October 2011 / Accepted: 20 October 2011 / Published: 26 October 2011
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (184 KB)
Abstract
A novel synthesis of triazolo[1,2-a]indazole-1,3,8-trione derivatives by reaction of urazole, dimedone and aromatic aldehydes under conventional heating and microwave irradiation and solvent-free conditions using silica nanoparticles prepared from rice husk ash as catalyst is described. The new method features high yields, multicomponent reactions
[...] Read more.
A novel synthesis of triazolo[1,2-a]indazole-1,3,8-trione derivatives by reaction of urazole, dimedone and aromatic aldehydes under conventional heating and microwave irradiation and solvent-free conditions using silica nanoparticles prepared from rice husk ash as catalyst is described. The new method features high yields, multicomponent reactions and environmental friendliness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Microwave-Assisted Improved Synthesis of Oxazolidin-2-ones, Oxazolidine-2-thiones and Thiazolidine-2-thione Chiral Auxiliaries
Molecules 2011, 16(10), 8803-8814; doi:10.3390/molecules16108803
Received: 13 September 2011 / Revised: 7 October 2011 / Accepted: 18 October 2011 / Published: 20 October 2011
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (211 KB)
Abstract
A microwave assisted method for the synthesis of some typical 4-substituted oxazolidinone chiral auxiliaries used in asymmetric synthesis is reported in this work. Under these conditions, treatment of (S)-phenylalaninol, (S)-phenylglycinol, (S)-valinol and (1S, 2R
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A microwave assisted method for the synthesis of some typical 4-substituted oxazolidinone chiral auxiliaries used in asymmetric synthesis is reported in this work. Under these conditions, treatment of (S)-phenylalaninol, (S)-phenylglycinol, (S)-valinol and (1S, 2R)-norephedrine with ethyl carbonate or carbon disulfide under the appropriate and specific microwave reaction conditions, led to an efficient synthesis of some oxazolidin-2-ones, oxazolidine-2-thiones and thiazolidine-2-thiones. The methodology reported in this paper provides these chiral auxiliaries with improved yields and a remarkable reduction on the reaction times, particularly in the case of thiazolidine-2-thiones, as compared with the conventional methods. All the auxiliaries prepared here show spectroscopic data in full agreement with those previously reported in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Efficient Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Ionic Esterified Amino Acids
Molecules 2011, 16(10), 8733-8744; doi:10.3390/molecules16108733
Received: 16 September 2011 / Revised: 11 October 2011 / Accepted: 14 October 2011 / Published: 19 October 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (226 KB)
Abstract
In this work, an efficient microwave-assisted methodology for the esterification of unprotected α-amino acids is described. Ionic esterified amino acids were synthesized in satisfactory yields in a facile one-pot solventless protocol from unprotected amino acids and alcohols under acid catalysis (MsOH or p
[...] Read more.
In this work, an efficient microwave-assisted methodology for the esterification of unprotected α-amino acids is described. Ionic esterified amino acids were synthesized in satisfactory yields in a facile one-pot solventless protocol from unprotected amino acids and alcohols under acid catalysis (MsOH or p-TsOH) to afford the pure products after a simple work-up procedure. This procedure can also be extended to the preparation of long and short chain alkyl and benzyl esters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Microwave Assisted Organic Synthesis (MAOS) of Small Molecules as Potential HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors
Molecules 2011, 16(8), 6858-6870; doi:10.3390/molecules16086858
Received: 18 July 2011 / Revised: 4 August 2011 / Accepted: 8 August 2011 / Published: 11 August 2011
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (511 KB)
Abstract
Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In recent years our research group has been engaged in the stucture-function study of this enzyme and in the development of some three-dimensional pharmacophore models which
[...] Read more.
Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In recent years our research group has been engaged in the stucture-function study of this enzyme and in the development of some three-dimensional pharmacophore models which have led to the identification of a large series of potent HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) bearing an indole core. To gain a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships (SARs), herein we report the design and microwave-assisted synthesis of a novel series of 1-H-benzylindole derivatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Novel Functionalized Hydantoin Derivatives and Their Conversion to 5-(Z) Arylidene-4H-imidazoles
Molecules 2011, 16(7), 5527-5537; doi:10.3390/molecules16075527
Received: 24 May 2011 / Revised: 22 June 2011 / Accepted: 27 June 2011 / Published: 29 June 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (250 KB)
Abstract
2-(Alkyl-1-yl)-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-ones 5a–n were synthesized via nucleophilic substitution of the methylsulfanyl group of the corresponding 2-(methylthio)-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-ones 3a–c with suitably substituted secondary amines. The starting 2-thioxo- imidazolidin-4-ones 2a,2b were prepared by condensation of thiohydantoin and
[...] Read more.
2-(Alkyl-1-yl)-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-ones 5a–n were synthesized via nucleophilic substitution of the methylsulfanyl group of the corresponding 2-(methylthio)-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-ones 3a–c with suitably substituted secondary amines. The starting 2-thioxo- imidazolidin-4-ones 2a,2b were prepared by condensation of thiohydantoin and benzo[b]-thiophene-3-carbaldehyde or benzofuran-3-carbaldehyde under microwave irracdiation (MW) conditions. 2-Methylthio derivatives 3a–c were prepared by treatment of 2a–b with methyl iodide in the presence of aqueous sodium hydroxide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Some New Fused 1,2,4-Triazines Bearing Thiophene Moieties With Expected Pharmacological Activity
Molecules 2011, 16(6), 4937-4957; doi:10.3390/molecules16064937
Received: 1 April 2011 / Revised: 25 May 2011 / Accepted: 3 June 2011 / Published: 15 June 2011
Cited by 29 | PDF Full-text (298 KB)
Abstract
Rapid and efficient solvent-free synthesis of 4-amino-3-mercapto-6-[2-(2-thienyl)vinyl]-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)-one 1 under microwave irradiation is described. Some new fused heterobicyclic nitrogen systems such as 1,2,4-triazino[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazinones, 1,3,4-thiadiazolo[2,3-c][1,2,4]triazinone and pyrazolo[5,1-c]-[1,2,4]triazine-7-carbonitrile, have been synthesized by treatment of 1 with bifunctional oxygen
[...] Read more.
Rapid and efficient solvent-free synthesis of 4-amino-3-mercapto-6-[2-(2-thienyl)vinyl]-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)-one 1 under microwave irradiation is described. Some new fused heterobicyclic nitrogen systems such as 1,2,4-triazino[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazinones, 1,3,4-thiadiazolo[2,3-c][1,2,4]triazinone and pyrazolo[5,1-c]-[1,2,4]triazine-7-carbonitrile, have been synthesized by treatment of 1 with bifunctional oxygen and halogen compounds, CS2/KOH and malononitrile via heterocyclization reactions, in addition to some uncondensed triazines. Structures of the products have been deduced from their elemental analysis and spectral data (IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR). Select new synthesized compounds were screened as anticancer agents, with some showing activity as cytotoxic agents against different cancer cell lines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Microwave Assisted Synthesis and Unusual Coupling of Some Novel Pyrido[3,2-f][1,4]thiazepines
Molecules 2011, 16(6), 4549-4559; doi:10.3390/molecules16064549
Received: 23 March 2011 / Revised: 7 May 2011 / Accepted: 25 May 2011 / Published: 31 May 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (197 KB)
Abstract
3-Amino-3-thioxopropanamide (1) reacted with ethyl acetoacetate to form 6-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide (2), which reacted with α-haloketones 3 to produce 2,3-disubstituted-8-hydroxy-6-methyl-2H,5H-pyrido[3,2-f]-[1,4]thiazepin-5-ones 4a-c. Benzoylation of 4c led to the formation of the dibenzoate derivative 9. Compounds 4a-c could be prepared stepwise
[...] Read more.
3-Amino-3-thioxopropanamide (1) reacted with ethyl acetoacetate to form 6-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide (2), which reacted with α-haloketones 3 to produce 2,3-disubstituted-8-hydroxy-6-methyl-2H,5H-pyrido[3,2-f]-[1,4]thiazepin-5-ones 4a-c. Benzoylation of 4c led to the formation of the dibenzoate derivative 9. Compounds 4a-c could be prepared stepwise through the formation of S-alkylated derivatives 10a-c. Compounds 2, 4a-c, 9 and 10a-c were prepared using microwave as a source of heat, and gave better yields in shorter times than those achieved by traditional methods. Coupling of 4a-c with arenediazonium chlorides proceeded unusually to give the 6-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-(arylazo)thieno[2,3-b]pyridin-3(2H)-one ring contraction products 14. Structures of the newly synthesized compounds were proven by spectral and chemical methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Microwave-Assisted and Efficient Solvent-free Knoevenagel Condensation. A Sustainable Protocol Using Porous Calcium Hydroxyapatite as Catalyst
Molecules 2010, 15(2), 813-823; doi:10.3390/molecules15020813
Received: 8 December 2009 / Revised: 21 January 2010 / Accepted: 21 January 2010 / Published: 4 February 2010
Cited by 35 | PDF Full-text (300 KB)
Abstract
A sustainable Knoevenagel condensation of a series of aldehydes with malononitrile and ethyl cyanoacetate is described. The process is based on the combination of microwave activation and hydroxyapatite catalysis under solvent-free conditions. Products are obtained in and high yields after short reaction times.
[...] Read more.
A sustainable Knoevenagel condensation of a series of aldehydes with malononitrile and ethyl cyanoacetate is described. The process is based on the combination of microwave activation and hydroxyapatite catalysis under solvent-free conditions. Products are obtained in and high yields after short reaction times. The effects of the specific surface of porous calcium hydroxyapatite and microwave activation are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Application of the Molecular Combing Technique to Starch Granules
Molecules 2009, 14(10), 4079-4086; doi:10.3390/molecules14104079
Received: 13 August 2009 / Revised: 2 September 2009 / Accepted: 12 October 2009 / Published: 12 October 2009
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (510 KB)
Abstract
The molecular combing technique was used to dissociate the nanostructural units of starch granules from the starch fragments after a gelatinization process. With the help of atomic force microscopy (AFM), we observed that some nanostructural chains were just flowing out of the granules.
[...] Read more.
The molecular combing technique was used to dissociate the nanostructural units of starch granules from the starch fragments after a gelatinization process. With the help of atomic force microscopy (AFM), we observed that some nanostructural chains were just flowing out of the granules. It proves that there are substantive nanostructural units in the starch granules, a phenomenon not previously observed, so these nanostructural units were defined as suspected intermediates. Furthermore, we conclude that blocklets of starch granules are formed through twisting or distortion of nanochains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Microwave-Assisted Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Oxo(diperoxo)(4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine)-molybdenum(VI)
Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3610-3620; doi:10.3390/molecules14093610
Received: 21 July 2009 / Revised: 3 September 2009 / Accepted: 14 September 2009 / Published: 16 September 2009
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (438 KB)
Abstract
The oxodiperoxo complex MoO(O2)2(tbbpy) (tbbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'- bipyridine) was isolated from the reaction of MoO2Cl2(tbbpy) in water under microwaveassisted heating at 120 ºC for 4 h. The structure of the oxodiperoxo complex was
[...] Read more.
The oxodiperoxo complex MoO(O2)2(tbbpy) (tbbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'- bipyridine) was isolated from the reaction of MoO2Cl2(tbbpy) in water under microwaveassisted heating at 120 ºC for 4 h. The structure of the oxodiperoxo complex was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The MoVI centre is seven-coordinated with a geometry which strongly resembles a highly distorted bipyramid. Individual MoO(O2)2(tbbpy) complexes are interdigitated along the [010] direction to form a column. The crystal structure is formed by the close packing of the columnar-stacked complexes. Interactions between neighbouring columns are essentially of van der Waals type mediated by the need to effectively fill the available space. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Microwave-Assisted Solvent-Free Acetylation of Cellulose with Acetic Anhydride in the Presence of Iodine as a Catalyst
Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3551-3566; doi:10.3390/molecules14093551
Received: 16 July 2009 / Revised: 9 September 2009 / Accepted: 11 September 2009 / Published: 11 September 2009
Cited by 44 | PDF Full-text (270 KB)
Abstract
In this work an optimization of the solvent-free acetylation of cellulose with acetic anhydride under microwave heating with iodine as a catalyst was performed. The optimized parameters included the microwave irradiation power from 300 W to 800 W, the reaction time between 5
[...] Read more.
In this work an optimization of the solvent-free acetylation of cellulose with acetic anhydride under microwave heating with iodine as a catalyst was performed. The optimized parameters included the microwave irradiation power from 300 W to 800 W, the reaction time between 5 to 40 min, the reaction temperature from 80 to 130 °C, and the amount of iodine from 1 to 15 mol%. The extent of the acetylation was measured by yield and the degree of substitution (DS), which was determined by a back-titration method. Acetylated cellulose was characterized by FT-IR, CP/MAS 13C-NMR, WRXD, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that within the range of catalyst amounts studied, the DS increased as the amount of iodine used increased, however, it was barely affected by microwave output. It was also found that the reaction time and temperature had an active influence on the extent of acetylation, however, this did not mean that at the higher temperature a better acetylation of cellulose would be obtained. The optimal reaction time and temperature found in this work were 30 min and 130 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Fast and Green Microwave-Assisted Conversion of Essential Oil Allylbenzenes into the Corresponding Aldehydes via Alkene Isomerization and Subsequent Potassium Permanganate Promoted Oxidative Alkene Group Cleavage
Molecules 2009, 14(9), 3411-3424; doi:10.3390/molecules14093411
Received: 12 August 2009 / Revised: 2 September 2009 / Accepted: 2 September 2009 / Published: 3 September 2009
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (324 KB)
Abstract
Essential oil allylbenzenes from have been converted quickly and efficiently into the corresponding benzaldehydes in good yields by a two-step “green” reaction pathway based on a solventless alkene group isomerization by KF/Al2O3 to form the corresponding 1-arylpropene and a subsequent
[...] Read more.
Essential oil allylbenzenes from have been converted quickly and efficiently into the corresponding benzaldehydes in good yields by a two-step “green” reaction pathway based on a solventless alkene group isomerization by KF/Al2O3 to form the corresponding 1-arylpropene and a subsequent solventless oxidation of the latter to the corresponding benzaldehyde by KMnO4/CuSO4·5H2O. The assistance by microwave irradiation results in very short reaction times (<15 minutes). The green conversion of eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) into vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) has been carried out in a similar way, requiring however two additional microwave-assisted synthetic steps for acetylation of the hydroxy group prior to the oxidation reaction, and for the final deacetylation of vanillin acetate (4-acetoxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) by KF/Al2O3 under solvent-free conditions, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Cross-Cyclotrimerization with Two Nitriles as a Synthetic Pathway to Unsymmetrically 3,3’-Disubstituted bis(Tetrahydroisoquinolines)
Molecules 2009, 14(8), 2918-2926; doi:10.3390/molecules14082918
Received: 10 July 2009 / Revised: 31 July 2009 / Accepted: 3 August 2009 / Published: 10 August 2009
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract Microwave assisted CpCo(CO)2 catalyzed cross-cyclotrimerizations of 1,7,9,15-hexadecatetrayne with two different nitriles to give unsymmetrically substituted bis(tetrahydroisoquinolines) was studied. The reaction proceeded with a range of alkyl and aryl nitriles with reasonable isolated yields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Efficient Microwave Assisted Syntheses of 2,5-Diketopiperazines in Aqueous Media
Molecules 2009, 14(8), 2836-2849; doi:10.3390/molecules14082836
Received: 23 June 2009 / Revised: 21 July 2009 / Accepted: 23 July 2009 / Published: 31 July 2009
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (211 KB)
Abstract
Aqueous in situ one-pot N-Boc-deprotection-cyclization of -Boc-dipeptidyl-tert-butyl and methyl esters under microwave irradiation afforded 2,5-diketopiperazines (DKPs) in excellent yields. This protocol is rapid, safe, environmentally friendly, and highly efficient, and showed that the tert-butoxy moiety is also an excellent leaving group
[...] Read more.
Aqueous in situ one-pot N-Boc-deprotection-cyclization of -Boc-dipeptidyl-tert-butyl and methyl esters under microwave irradiation afforded 2,5-diketopiperazines (DKPs) in excellent yields. This protocol is rapid, safe, environmentally friendly, and highly efficient, and showed that the tert-butoxy moiety is also an excellent leaving group for these cyclizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Extraction with SPME and Synthesis of 2-Methyl-6-vinylpyrazine by a ‘One Pot’ Reaction Using Microwaves
Molecules 2009, 14(6), 2160-2166; doi:10.3390/molecules14062160
Received: 20 April 2009 / Revised: 30 May 2009 / Accepted: 2 June 2009 / Published: 15 June 2009
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (224 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A synthesis of 2-methyl-6-vinylpyrazine was carried out by way of a ‘one pot’ reaction. In order to establish the efficiency of this synthesis the extraction of the volatiles released by male papaya fruit flies was performed by SPME (solid phase micro-extraction). The compound
[...] Read more.
A synthesis of 2-methyl-6-vinylpyrazine was carried out by way of a ‘one pot’ reaction. In order to establish the efficiency of this synthesis the extraction of the volatiles released by male papaya fruit flies was performed by SPME (solid phase micro-extraction). The compound was separated and identified using GC/MSD (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry detector). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Synthesis of γ-Nitro Aliphatic Methyl Esters Via Michael Additions Promoted by Microwave Irradiation
Molecules 2009, 14(4), 1595-1604; doi:10.3390/molecules14041595
Received: 5 February 2009 / Revised: 21 March 2009 / Accepted: 8 April 2009 / Published: 21 April 2009
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (152 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract A simple and efficient protocol has been developed for the direct synthesis of γ-nitrobutyric acid methyl esters under microwave irradiation. This methodology reduces reaction times from days to minutes, compared to conventional conditions. Additionally, these conditions increased yields and provided cleaner reactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessCommunication Phosphotungstic Acid: An Efficient, Cost-effective and Recyclable Catalyst for the Synthesis of Polysubstituted Quinolines
Molecules 2009, 14(3), 1126-1133; doi:10.3390/molecules14031126
Received: 4 January 2009 / Revised: 20 January 2009 / Accepted: 17 February 2009 / Published: 12 March 2009
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (117 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract Phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40) was used as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the synthesis of polysubstituted quinolines through the Friedländer condensation of 2-aminoarylketone with carbonyl compounds, which was achieved by conventional heating under solvent-free conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Microwave Assisted Reactions of Some Azaheterocylic Compounds
Molecules 2009, 14(1), 403-411; doi:10.3390/molecules14010403
Received: 23 November 2008 / Revised: 12 January 2009 / Accepted: 15 January 2009 / Published: 15 January 2009
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (72 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A fast, general, environmentally friendly and facile method for preparation of five- and six-membered ring diazaheterocylic salts under microwave irradiation is presented. The N-alkylation reactions of imidazole, pyrimidine, pyridazine and phthalazine have been studied. The microwaves remarkably accelerated these N-alkylations, the
[...] Read more.
A fast, general, environmentally friendly and facile method for preparation of five- and six-membered ring diazaheterocylic salts under microwave irradiation is presented. The N-alkylation reactions of imidazole, pyrimidine, pyridazine and phthalazine have been studied. The microwaves remarkably accelerated these N-alkylations, the reaction times decreased dramatically, the reaction conditions were milder, the consumed energy decreased considerably and the amount of solvents used was reduced substantially. Consequently, the microwave assisted alkylation of N-containing heterocycles could be considered eco-friendly. In some cases, under MW irradiation the yields are also higher. A comparative study of microwave vs. classical conditions (liquid solvents) has been done. Twelve new diazaheterocylic salts of potential practical interest were obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessArticle Dodecatungstophosphoric Acid (H3PW12O40), Samarium and Ruthenium (ІІІ) Chloride Catalyzed Synthesis of Unsaturated 2-Phenyl-5(4H)-oxazolone Derivatives under Solvent-free Conditions
Molecules 2008, 13(12), 3246-3252; doi:10.3390/molecules13123246
Received: 5 November 2008 / Revised: 27 November 2008 / Accepted: 16 December 2008 / Published: 18 December 2008
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (151 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We found that dodecatungstophosphoric acid (H3PW12O40), samarium and ruthenium(III) chloride act as efficient catalysts for synthesis of unsaturated 2-phenyl-5(4H)oxazolone derivatives under solvent-free conditions. The key features of the reported protocols are short reaction times, high yields of
[...] Read more.
We found that dodecatungstophosphoric acid (H3PW12O40), samarium and ruthenium(III) chloride act as efficient catalysts for synthesis of unsaturated 2-phenyl-5(4H)oxazolone derivatives under solvent-free conditions. The key features of the reported protocols are short reaction times, high yields of products, ambient conditions and simple workup. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
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Review

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Open AccessReview MAOS and Medicinal Chemistry: Some Important Examples from the Last Years
Molecules 2011, 16(11), 9274-9297; doi:10.3390/molecules16119274
Received: 16 September 2011 / Revised: 17 October 2011 / Accepted: 26 October 2011 / Published: 7 November 2011
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (440 KB)
Abstract
This review aims to highlight microwave-assisted organic synthesis as applied to medicinal chemistry in the last years, showing some reactions performed under microwave irradiation for the synthesis of distinct structurally molecules of biological interest, divided into the following groups: antineoplastics, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial agents,
[...] Read more.
This review aims to highlight microwave-assisted organic synthesis as applied to medicinal chemistry in the last years, showing some reactions performed under microwave irradiation for the synthesis of distinct structurally molecules of biological interest, divided into the following groups: antineoplastics, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial agents, antivirals, agents for the treatment of neglected diseases and central nervous system-acting prototypes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)
Open AccessReview Microwave Multicomponent Synthesis
Molecules 2009, 14(12), 4936-4972; doi:10.3390/molecules14124936
Received: 6 November 2009 / Revised: 17 November 2009 / Accepted: 26 November 2009 / Published: 1 December 2009
Cited by 66 | PDF Full-text (532 KB)
Abstract
In the manner that very important research is often performed by multidisciplinary research teams, the applications of multicomponent reactions involving the combination of multiple starting materials with different functional groups leading to the higher efficiency and environmentally friendly construction of multifunctional/complex target molecules
[...] Read more.
In the manner that very important research is often performed by multidisciplinary research teams, the applications of multicomponent reactions involving the combination of multiple starting materials with different functional groups leading to the higher efficiency and environmentally friendly construction of multifunctional/complex target molecules is growing in importance. This review will explore the advances and advantages in microwave multicomponent synthesis (MMS) that have been achieved over the last five years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Assisted Synthesis)

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