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Topical Collection "Recent Advances in Flavors and Fragrances"

A topical collection in Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This collection belongs to the section "Natural Products".

Editor

Collection Editor
Prof. Dr. Luca Forti

Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena & Reggio Emilia, via G. Campi 183, Modena 41125, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biocatalysis-biotransformations in organic synthesis; natural product chemistry; recovery of biologically active molecules from plant and marine matrices; polyphenols; application of yeast in organic synthesis; VOCs producing yeasts

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Flavors and fragrances find widespread applications in food, beverages, cosmetics, detergents, and pharmaceutical products. Industrially, world-wide production is estimated to be valued at US$ 20 billion.

The majority of these products are prepared through chemical synthesis or by extraction from plants. However, the employment of new biotechnological processes has increased considerably in the last few years. Because different enantiomers of chiral odorants, flavors or fragrances can show different sensorial properties (in terms of odor quality and/or intensity), their specific synthesis is valuable. Recently, much effort in R&D has been devoted to the identification of the active enantiomers of potent odorants and to their efficient chiral synthesis. In this context, biotechnology (biotransformations using microorganisms and isolated enzymes) represents a useful tool for catalyzing a large number of stereochemical transformations. Furthermore, all major facets of society and economic activities support the choice of environmentally friendly processes, and consumers have developed a preference for ‘natural’ or ‘organic’ products, thus developing a market for flavors and fragrances of biotechnological origin.

For this issue, we would like to publish original research articles or reviews on all aspects of flavor and fragrance, including isolation and sampling, chemical analyses, preparation, and delivery systems. Articles covering a wide range of topics, such as flavors, fragrances, aromas, essential oils, volatiles, biosynthesis, biotransformation, biotechnology, biological activities, biodegradation, computer-aided flavors, and fragrances design are welcomed for inclusion in this Topical Collection of Molecules.

This Topical Collection will offer an attractive forum for academia as well as for industry to present the state of the art on all aspects of flavors and fragrances. I strongly encourage authors to submit papers for this Topical Collection, within the scope of Molecules.

Prof. Dr. Luca Forti
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • flavors
  • fragrances
  • aroma
  • essential oil
  • isolation and sampling
  • chemical analysis
  • chiral recognition
  • synthesis
  • biotechnology
  • biotransformation
  • biocatalysis
  • delivery system
  • computer aided design

Published Papers (51 papers)

2017

Jump to: 2016, 2015

Open AccessArticle Disaccharides: Influence on Volatiles and Phenolics of Sour Cherry Juice
Molecules 2017, 22(11), 1939; doi:10.3390/molecules22111939
Received: 13 October 2017 / Revised: 4 November 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
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Abstract
The food industry is continuously developing ingredients, processing methods and packaging materials to improve the quality of fruit products. The aim of this work was to study the effect of sugars, a common ingredient in the food industry, on phenolics and volatiles of
[...] Read more.
The food industry is continuously developing ingredients, processing methods and packaging materials to improve the quality of fruit products. The aim of this work was to study the effect of sugars, a common ingredient in the food industry, on phenolics and volatiles of sour cherry juice. Sucrose, trehalose and maltose chemical isomers were chosen for this investigation. All sugars influenced the evaluated parameters. Samples with maltose addition had lower, while samples with sucrose and trehalose addition had higher anthocyanin content than the control sample. Generally, trehalose had a higher positive effect on volatiles with the desired flavor note. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Discriminative Analysis of Different Grades of Gaharu (Aquilaria malaccensis Lamk.) via 1H-NMR-Based Metabolomics Using PLS-DA and Random Forests Classification Models
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1612; doi:10.3390/molecules22101612
Received: 17 August 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 25 September 2017
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Abstract
Gaharu (agarwood, Aquilaria malaccensis Lamk.) is a valuable tropical rainforest product traded internationally for its distinctive fragrance. It is not only popular as incense and in perfumery, but also favored in traditional medicine due to its sedative, carminative, cardioprotective and analgesic effects. The
[...] Read more.
Gaharu (agarwood, Aquilaria malaccensis Lamk.) is a valuable tropical rainforest product traded internationally for its distinctive fragrance. It is not only popular as incense and in perfumery, but also favored in traditional medicine due to its sedative, carminative, cardioprotective and analgesic effects. The current study addresses the chemical differences and similarities between gaharu samples of different grades, obtained commercially, using 1H-NMR-based metabolomics. Two classification models: partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and Random Forests were developed to classify the gaharu samples on the basis of their chemical constituents. The gaharu samples could be reclassified into a ‘high grade’ group (samples A, B and D), characterized by high contents of kusunol, jinkohol, and 10-epi-γ-eudesmol; an ‘intermediate grade’ group (samples C, F and G), dominated by fatty acid and vanillic acid; and a ‘low grade’ group (sample E and H), which had higher contents of aquilarone derivatives and phenylethyl chromones. The results showed that 1H- NMR-based metabolomics can be a potential method to grade the quality of gaharu samples on the basis of their chemical constituents. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle One-Pot Multi-Enzymatic Synthesis of the Four Stereoisomers of 4-Methylheptan-3-ol
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1591; doi:10.3390/molecules22101591
Received: 24 July 2017 / Revised: 12 September 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 22 September 2017
PDF Full-text (756 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The use of pheromones in the integrated pest management of insects is currently considered a sustainable and environmentally benign alternative to hazardous insecticides. 4-Methylheptan-3-ol is an interesting example of an insect pheromone, because its stereoisomers are active towards different species. All four possible
[...] Read more.
The use of pheromones in the integrated pest management of insects is currently considered a sustainable and environmentally benign alternative to hazardous insecticides. 4-Methylheptan-3-ol is an interesting example of an insect pheromone, because its stereoisomers are active towards different species. All four possible stereoisomers of this compound were prepared from 4-methylhept-4-en-3-one by a one-pot procedure in which the two stereogenic centres were created during two sequential reductions catalysed by an ene-reductase (ER) and an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), respectively. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Chemical and Antimicrobial Analyses of Sideritis romana L. subsp. purpurea (Tal. ex Benth.) Heywood, an Endemic of the Western Balkan
Molecules 2017, 22(9), 1395; doi:10.3390/molecules22091395
Received: 29 July 2017 / Revised: 13 August 2017 / Accepted: 18 August 2017 / Published: 23 August 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (775 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A comprehensive study on essential oil and different solvent extracts of Sideritis romana L. subsp. purpurea (Tal. ex Benth.) Heywood (Lamiaceae) from Montenegro is reported. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the essential oil revealed a total of 43 components with bicyclogermacrene (23.8%),
[...] Read more.
A comprehensive study on essential oil and different solvent extracts of Sideritis romana L. subsp. purpurea (Tal. ex Benth.) Heywood (Lamiaceae) from Montenegro is reported. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the essential oil revealed a total of 43 components with bicyclogermacrene (23.8%), germacrene D (8%), (E)-caryophyllene (7.9%) and spathulenol (5.5%) as the major ones. Sesquiterpenoid group was found to be the most dominant one (64.8%), with 19.9% of the oxygenated forms. In the crude methanol extract of the investigated plant, obtained by Sohhlet exraction, the total phenol content was 14.7 ± 0.4 mg of GA/g, the total flavonoids were 0.29 ± 0.03% expressed as hyperoside percentage, whereas the total tannins content was 0.22 ± 0.04% expressed as pyrogallol percentage. For the antimicrobial activity determination, the following microorganisms have been used: methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 29213)) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (clinical strain)), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), carbapenem-susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae (clinical strain), carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (clinical strain) and Candida albicans (ATCC 14053). The essential oil showed high potency against MSSA and MRSA, both at high (~5 × 105 CFU/mL) and low (~5 × 103 CFU/mL) inoculum. With respect to MSSA, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value was 0.307 mg/mL, with bactericidal activity obtained at 0.615 mg/mL, while, in the case of MRSA, the MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were 0.076 and 0.153 mg/mL, respectively. Regarding anti-Candida albicans activity, the MIC value was 2.46 mg/mL without reaching fungicidal activity. In addition to the observed essential oil efficacy, different solvent extracts were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity. Similarly to the essential oil, thehighest efficacy was observed against both MSSA and MRSA strains, at high and low inoculums, in the case of the 1,2-dichloroethane and methanol extracts. A potent fungicidal activity has been also found for the n-hexane and 1,2-dichloroethane extracts. It can be concluded that Sideritis romana L. subsp. purpurea (Tal. ex Benth.) Heywood provides a wide range of application in different fields such as phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology or pharmacognosy. Full article
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Open AccessReview β-Ocimene, a Key Floral and Foliar Volatile Involved in Multiple Interactions between Plants and Other Organisms
Molecules 2017, 22(7), 1148; doi:10.3390/molecules22071148
Received: 18 April 2017 / Accepted: 3 July 2017 / Published: 13 July 2017
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Abstract
β-Ocimene is a very common plant volatile released in important amounts from the leaves and flowers of many plant species. This acyclic monoterpene can play several biological functions in plants, by potentially affecting floral visitors and also by mediating defensive responses to herbivory.
[...] Read more.
β-Ocimene is a very common plant volatile released in important amounts from the leaves and flowers of many plant species. This acyclic monoterpene can play several biological functions in plants, by potentially affecting floral visitors and also by mediating defensive responses to herbivory. The ubiquity and high relative abundance of β-ocimene in the floral scents of species from most plant families and from different pollination syndromes (ranging from generalism to specialism) strongly suggest that this terpenoid may play an important role in the attraction of pollinators to flowers. We compiled abundant evidence from published studies that supports β-ocimene as a generalist attractant of a wide spectrum of pollinators. We found no studies testing behavioural responses of pollinators to β-ocimene, that could directly demonstrate or deny the function of β-ocimene in pollinator attraction; but several case studies support that the emissions of β-ocimene in flowers of different species follow marked temporal and spatial patterns of emission, which are typical from floral volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that are involved in pollinator attraction. Furthermore, important β-ocimene emissions are induced from vegetative plant tissues after herbivory in many species, which have relevant functions in the establishment of tritrophic interactions. We thus conclude that β-ocimene is a key plant volatile with multiple relevant functions in plants, depending on the organ and the time of emission. Experimental behavioural studies on pure β-ocimene conducted with pollinating insects will be necessary to prove the assumptions made here. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Sensory Characteristics and Volatile Components of Dry Dog Foods Manufactured with Sorghum Fractions
Molecules 2017, 22(6), 1012; doi:10.3390/molecules22061012
Received: 23 May 2017 / Revised: 14 June 2017 / Accepted: 14 June 2017 / Published: 17 June 2017
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Abstract
Descriptive sensory analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a modified headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method was performed on three extruded dry dog food diets manufactured with different fractions of red sorghum and a control diet containing corn, brewer’s rice, and wheat as
[...] Read more.
Descriptive sensory analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a modified headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method was performed on three extruded dry dog food diets manufactured with different fractions of red sorghum and a control diet containing corn, brewer’s rice, and wheat as a grain source in order to determine the effect of sorghum fractions on dry dog food sensory properties. The aroma compounds and flavor profiles of samples were similar with small differences, such as higher toasted aroma notes, and musty and dusty flavor in the mill-feed sample. A total of 37 compounds were tentatively identified and semi-quantified. Aldehydes were the major group present in the samples. The total volatile concentration was low, reflecting the mild aroma of the samples. Partial least squares regression was performed to identify correlations between sensory characteristics and detected aroma compounds. Possible relationships, such as hexanal and oxidized oil, and broth aromatics were identified. Volatile compounds were also associated with earthy, musty, and meaty aromas and flavor notes. This study showed that extruded dry dog foods manufactured with different red sorghum fractions had similar aroma, flavor, and volatile profiles. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Selected Mercapto Flavor Compounds on Acrylamide Elimination in a Model System
Molecules 2017, 22(6), 888; doi:10.3390/molecules22060888
Received: 3 May 2017 / Revised: 3 May 2017 / Accepted: 20 May 2017 / Published: 31 May 2017
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Abstract
The effect of four mercapto flavor compounds (1,2-ethanedithiol, 1-butanethiol, 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, and 2-furanmethanethiol) on acrylamide elimination were investigated in model systems. The obtained results showed that mercaptans assayed were effective in elimination arylamide in a model system. Their reactivities for decreasing acrylamide content depended
[...] Read more.
The effect of four mercapto flavor compounds (1,2-ethanedithiol, 1-butanethiol, 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, and 2-furanmethanethiol) on acrylamide elimination were investigated in model systems. The obtained results showed that mercaptans assayed were effective in elimination arylamide in a model system. Their reactivities for decreasing acrylamide content depended on mercaptan’s molecular structure and acrylamide disappearance decreased in the following order: 1,2-ethanedithiol > 2-methyl-3-furanthiol > 1-butanethiol > 2-furanmethanethiol. Mercaptans were added to acrylamide to produce the corresponding 3-(alkylthio) propionamides. This reaction was irreversible and only trace amounts of acrylamide were formed by thermal heating of 3-(alkylthio) propanamide. Although a large amount disappeared, only part of the acrylamide conversed into 3-(alkylthio) propionamides. All of these results constitute a fundamental proof of the complexity of the reactions involved in the removal of free acrylamide in foods. This implies mercapto flavor/aroma may directly or indirectly reduce the level of acrylamide in food processing. This study could be regarded as a pioneer contribution on acrylamide elimination in a model system by the addition of mercapto flavor compounds. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Impact of a Microbial Cocktail Used as a Starter Culture on Cocoa Fermentation and Chocolate Flavor
Molecules 2017, 22(5), 766; doi:10.3390/molecules22050766
Received: 29 January 2017 / Revised: 12 April 2017 / Accepted: 2 May 2017 / Published: 9 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (17805 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chocolate production suffered a vast impact with the emergence of the “witches’ broom” disease in cocoa plants. To recover cocoa production, many disease-resistant hybrid plants have been developed. However, some different cocoa hybrids produce cocoa beans that generate chocolate with variable quality. Fermentation
[...] Read more.
Chocolate production suffered a vast impact with the emergence of the “witches’ broom” disease in cocoa plants. To recover cocoa production, many disease-resistant hybrid plants have been developed. However, some different cocoa hybrids produce cocoa beans that generate chocolate with variable quality. Fermentation of cocoa beans is a microbiological process that can be applied for the production of chocolate flavor precursors, leading to overcoming the problem of variable chocolate quality. The aim of this work was to use a cocktail of microorganisms as a starter culture on the fermentation of the ripe cocoa pods from PH15 cocoa hybrid, and evaluate its influence on the microbial communities present on the fermentative process on the compounds involved during the fermentation, and to perform the chocolate sensorial characterization. According to the results obtained, different volatile compounds were identified in fermented beans and in the chocolate produced. Bitterness was the dominant taste found in non-inoculated chocolate, while chocolate made with inoculated beans showed bitter, sweet, and cocoa tastes. 2,3-Butanediol and 2,3-dimethylpyrazine were considered as volatile compounds making the difference on the flavor of both chocolates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA CCMA 0200, Lactobacillus plantarum CCMA 0238, and Acetobacter pasteurianus CCMA 0241 are proposed as starter cultures for cocoa fermentation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Emission of the Floral Scent of Four Osmanthus fragrans Cultivars in Response to Different Temperatures
Molecules 2017, 22(3), 430; doi:10.3390/molecules22030430
Received: 19 January 2017 / Revised: 5 March 2017 / Accepted: 6 March 2017 / Published: 8 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1366 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Floral scent is an important part of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from plants, and is influenced by many environmental and endogenous factors. To investigate the influence of temperature on the emission of the floral scent of Osmanthus fragrans, the number of
[...] Read more.
Floral scent is an important part of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from plants, and is influenced by many environmental and endogenous factors. To investigate the influence of temperature on the emission of the floral scent of Osmanthus fragrans, the number of chemical compounds and their relative release amounts from four cultivars of O. fragrans under different temperature treatments, were identified using the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) technique and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in this study. Results revealed that the numbers and release amounts of floral scent components were significantly influenced by different temperatures, and depend on different cultivars and different types of compounds. Overall, most cultivars had the largest number of chemical compounds in 19 °C and the numbers of chemical compounds decreased with the increase or decrease in the temperature. Alcohols and ketones were the two main kinds of compounds responding to temperature change. The response of a specific chemical compound to temperature change was different in four cultivars. Generally, linalool, α-ionone, β-ionone, and γ-decalactone accounted for the highest proportion in the nine main compounds, and changes of these four chemical compounds to different temperatures had obvious contributions to the floral scent of O. fragrans. The results obtained provide evidence that temperatures can greatly influence the emission of floral scent. Full article
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Open AccessReview Microbial Contribution to Wine Aroma and Its Intended Use for Wine Quality Improvement
Molecules 2017, 22(2), 189; doi:10.3390/molecules22020189
Received: 7 December 2016 / Revised: 14 January 2017 / Accepted: 19 January 2017 / Published: 24 January 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2980 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wine is a complex matrix that includes components with different chemical natures, the volatile compounds being responsible for wine aroma quality. The microbial ecosystem of grapes and wine, including Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts, as well as lactic acid bacteria, is considered by
[...] Read more.
Wine is a complex matrix that includes components with different chemical natures, the volatile compounds being responsible for wine aroma quality. The microbial ecosystem of grapes and wine, including Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts, as well as lactic acid bacteria, is considered by winemakers and oenologists as a decisive factor influencing wine aroma and consumer’s preferences. The challenges and opportunities emanating from the contribution of wine microbiome to the production of high quality wines are astounding. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the impact of microorganisms in wine aroma and flavour, and the biochemical reactions and pathways in which they participate, therefore contributing to both the quality and acceptability of wine. In this context, an overview of genetic and transcriptional studies to explain and interpret these effects is included, and new directions are proposed. It also considers the contribution of human oral microbiota to wine aroma conversion and perception during wine consumption. The potential use of wine yeasts and lactic acid bacteria as biological tools to enhance wine quality and the advent of promising advice allowed by pioneering -omics technologies on wine research are also discussed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Volatile Compound Profiling by HS-SPME/GC-MS-FID of a Core Olive Cultivar Collection as a Tool for Aroma Improvement of Virgin Olive Oil
Molecules 2017, 22(1), 141; doi:10.3390/molecules22010141
Received: 2 December 2016 / Revised: 29 December 2016 / Accepted: 10 January 2017 / Published: 14 January 2017
PDF Full-text (777 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Virgin olive oil (VOO) is the only food product requiring official sensory analysis to be classified in commercial categories, in which the evaluation of the aroma plays a very important role. The selection of parents, with the aim of obtaining new cultivars with
[...] Read more.
Virgin olive oil (VOO) is the only food product requiring official sensory analysis to be classified in commercial categories, in which the evaluation of the aroma plays a very important role. The selection of parents, with the aim of obtaining new cultivars with improved oil aroma, is of paramount importance in olive breeding programs. We have assessed the volatile fraction by headspace-solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-flame ionization detection (HS-SPME/GC-MS-FID) and the deduced aroma properties of VOO from a core set of olive cultivars (Core-36) which possesses most of the genetic diversity found in the World Olive Germplasm Collection (IFAPA Alameda del Obispo) located in Cordoba, Spain. The VOO volatile fractions of Core-36 cultivars display a high level of variability. It is mostly made of compounds produced from polyunsaturated fatty acids through the lipoxygenase pathway, which confirms to be a general characteristic of the olive species (Olea europaea L.). The main group of volatile compounds in the oils was six straight-chain carbon compounds derived from linolenic acid, some of them being the main contributors to the aroma of the olive oils according to their odor activity values (OAV). The high level of variability found for the volatile fraction of the oils from Core-36 and, therefore, for the aroma odor notes, suggest that this core set may be a very useful tool for the choice of optimal parents in olive breeding programs in order to raise new cultivars with improved VOO aroma. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Optimization of the Production of 1-Phenylethanol Using Enzymes from Flowers of Tea (Camellia sinensis) Plants
Molecules 2017, 22(1), 131; doi:10.3390/molecules22010131
Received: 9 December 2016 / Revised: 6 January 2017 / Accepted: 10 January 2017 / Published: 13 January 2017
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Abstract
1-Phenylethanol (1PE) can be used as a fragrance in food flavoring and cosmetic industries and as an intermediate in the pharmaceutical industry. 1PE can be synthesized from acetophenone, and the cost of 1PE is higher than the cost of acetophenone. Therefore, it is
[...] Read more.
1-Phenylethanol (1PE) can be used as a fragrance in food flavoring and cosmetic industries and as an intermediate in the pharmaceutical industry. 1PE can be synthesized from acetophenone, and the cost of 1PE is higher than the cost of acetophenone. Therefore, it is important to establish an effective and low-cost approach for producing 1PE. Our previous studies found that tea (Camellia sinensis) flowers, which are an abundant and waste resource, contained enzymes that could transform acetophenone to 1PE. In the present study, we extracted crude enzymes from tea flowers and optimized the production conditions of 1PE using response surface methodology. The optimized conditions were an extraction pH of 7.0, a reaction pH of 5.3, a reaction temperature of 55 °C, a reaction time of 100 min, a coenzyme NADPH concentration of 3.75 μmol/mL in the reaction assay, and a substrate acetophenone concentration of 1.25 μmol/mL in the reaction assay. The results provide essential information for future industrial 1PE production using plant-derived enzymes. Full article
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2016

Jump to: 2017, 2015

Open AccessArticle Chemical Studies of Yellow Tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) Fruit Flavor by Using a Molecular Sensory Approach
Molecules 2016, 21(12), 1729; doi:10.3390/molecules21121729
Received: 6 November 2016 / Revised: 12 December 2016 / Accepted: 13 December 2016 / Published: 16 December 2016
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Abstract
The odor-active volatile compounds of yellow tamarillo fruit (S. betaceum Cav.) were identified and quantified by using a sensomics approach, combining a gentle volatile extraction (solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE)), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and sensory analyses (gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract
[...] Read more.
The odor-active volatile compounds of yellow tamarillo fruit (S. betaceum Cav.) were identified and quantified by using a sensomics approach, combining a gentle volatile extraction (solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE)), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and sensory analyses (gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA)). The medium-term purpose of this work is to evaluate the change of odor-active volatiles during processing. Thus, (Z)-3-hexenal, hexanal, and ethyl butanoate were identified as key aroma compounds of yellow tamarillo. The C6-aliphatic compounds, aliphatic esters, and terpenols were characterized as the volatiles responsible for the herbal-green, fruity, and fresh-mint odor notes of this variety, respectively. Additionally, one non-volatile compound contributing to the residual bitter taste of this fruit was isolated by a bioguided (taste sensory analyses) fractionation. The freeze-dried fruit was sequentially liquid-liquid partitioned with solvents of different polarity, and then the ethyl acetate fraction was submitted to size exclusion chromatography. Then, its structure was elucidated as rosmarinic acid, by using common spectroscopic methods (mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)). The amount of rosmarinic acid was quantified as 46.17 ± 1.20 mg/100 g of dried fruit, by the external standard method. Its bitter taste threshold value was determined by using the 3AFC (alternative forced choice) method to be 37.00 ± 1.25 mg/L. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Laurus nobilis, Zingiber officinale and Anethum graveolens Essential Oils: Composition, Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities against Bacteria Isolated from Fish and Shellfish
Molecules 2016, 21(10), 1414; doi:10.3390/molecules21101414
Received: 25 July 2016 / Revised: 7 October 2016 / Accepted: 17 October 2016 / Published: 22 October 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (703 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Several bacterial strains were isolated from wild and reared fish and shellfish. The identification of these strains showed the dominance of the Aeromonas hydrophila species in all seafood samples, followed by Staphylococcus spp., Vibrio alginolyticus, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella ornithinolytica, Klebsiella
[...] Read more.
Several bacterial strains were isolated from wild and reared fish and shellfish. The identification of these strains showed the dominance of the Aeromonas hydrophila species in all seafood samples, followed by Staphylococcus spp., Vibrio alginolyticus, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella ornithinolytica, Klebsiella oxytoca and Serratia odorifera. The isolates were studied for their ability to produce exoenzymes and biofilms. The chemical composition of the essential oils from Laurus nobilis leaves, Zingiber officinale rhizomes and Anethum graveolens aerial parts was studied by GC and GC/MS. The essential oils’ antioxidant and antibacterial activities against the isolated microorganisms were studied. Low concentrations of the three essential oils were needed to inhibit the growth of the selected bacteria and the lowest MBCs values were obtained for the laurel essential oil. The selected essential oils can be used as a good natural preservative in fish food due to their antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Chemical Composition and in Vitro Antimicrobial, Cytotoxic, and Central Nervous System Activities of the Essential Oils of Citrus medica L. cv. ‘Liscia’ and C. medica cv. ‘Rugosa’ Cultivated in Southern Italy
Molecules 2016, 21(9), 1244; doi:10.3390/molecules21091244
Received: 19 July 2016 / Revised: 6 September 2016 / Accepted: 12 September 2016 / Published: 18 September 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1754 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Citrus medica cv. ‘liscia’ and C. medica cv. ‘rugosa’ are two taxa of citron, belonging to the biodiversity of South Italy, in particular of Amalfi Coast, in the Campania region. The chemical composition of the essential oils (EOs) from fruit peels of both
[...] Read more.
Citrus medica cv. ‘liscia’ and C. medica cv. ‘rugosa’ are two taxa of citron, belonging to the biodiversity of South Italy, in particular of Amalfi Coast, in the Campania region. The chemical composition of the essential oils (EOs) from fruit peels of both C. medica cultivars was studied by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. In all, 100 compounds were identified, 82 for C. medica cv. ‘liscia’, accounting for 91.4% of the total oil, and 88 for C. medica cv. ‘rugosa’, accounting for 92.0% of the total oil. Monoterpene hydrocarbons are the main constituents in both oils of C. medica cv. ‘liscia’ (79.1%) and C. medica cv. ‘rugosa’ (80.2%). In both oils, limonene (67.2%–62.8%) and camphene (8.5%–10.9%) are the main constituents. The antimicrobial activity of the EOs was assayed against some bacterial strains: Bacillus cereus (DSM 4313), Bacillus cereus (DSM 4384), Staphylococcus aureus (DSM 25693), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 50071), and Escherichia coli (DSM 8579). Low concentrations of C. medica cv. ‘rugosa’ EO showed an inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa and higher concentrations inhibited more B. cereus (4384) and E. coli than S. aureus. The cytotoxicity of the EO was evaluated against SH-SY5Y cell line. The influence of the EO on the expression of adenylate cyclase 1 (ADCY1) was also studied. The antimicrobial activity registered confirm their traditional uses as food preserving agents and led us to hypothesize the possible use of these oils as antimicrobials. The alterations in ADCY1 expression suggested a role for limonene in effects on the central nervous system. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Chemical Composition, Antibacterial and Phytotoxic Activities of Peganum harmala Seed Essential Oils from Five Different Localities in Northern Africa
Molecules 2016, 21(9), 1235; doi:10.3390/molecules21091235
Received: 26 July 2016 / Revised: 2 September 2016 / Accepted: 12 September 2016 / Published: 15 September 2016
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Abstract
Peganum harmala L., also known as Syrian rue or Pègano, is a herbaceous plant belonging to the Zygohpyllaceae family, and is widely used in traditional medicine. The chemical composition of essential oils of P. harmala seeds from five different regions of Northern Africa
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Peganum harmala L., also known as Syrian rue or Pègano, is a herbaceous plant belonging to the Zygohpyllaceae family, and is widely used in traditional medicine. The chemical composition of essential oils of P. harmala seeds from five different regions of Northern Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia) was studied by GC and GC-MS analyses. A total of 105 compounds were identified, the main components being oxygenated monoterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Eugenol is the main component in all oils. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was assayed against some bacterial strains: Staphylococcus aureus (DSM 25693), Bacillus cereus (DSM 4313), Bacillus cereus (DSM4384), Escherichia coli (DMS 857) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 50071). All the oils showed different inhibitory activity. In the twentieth century this is an important result; we need possible new botanical drugs because the problem of resistance to antimicrobial drugs has become apparent. Moreover, the essential oils were evaluated for their possible in vitro phytotoxic activity against germination and initial radicle growth of Raphanus sativus L., Lepidium sativum L., and Ruta graveolens L. The results showed that both germination and radical elongation were sensitive to the oils. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Elucidation of Differential Accumulation of 1-Phenylethanol in Flowers and Leaves of Tea (Camellia sinensis) Plants
Molecules 2016, 21(9), 1106; doi:10.3390/molecules21091106
Received: 1 August 2016 / Revised: 16 August 2016 / Accepted: 19 August 2016 / Published: 23 August 2016
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Abstract
1-Phenylethanol (1PE) is a major aromatic volatile in tea (Camellia sinensis) flowers, whereas it occurs in a much smaller amounts in leaves. Enzymes involved in the formation of 1PE in plants and the reason why 1PE differentially accumulates in plants is
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1-Phenylethanol (1PE) is a major aromatic volatile in tea (Camellia sinensis) flowers, whereas it occurs in a much smaller amounts in leaves. Enzymes involved in the formation of 1PE in plants and the reason why 1PE differentially accumulates in plants is unknown. In the present study, enzymes in the last step leading from acetophenone to 1PE were isolated from tea flowers by traditional biochemical chromatography. The two types of partially purified enzymes were proposed to be responsible for formations of (R)-1PE and (S)-1PE, respectively. Tea leaves also contained such enzymes having equivalent activities with flowers. Stable isotope labeling experiments indicated that weak transformation from l-phenylalanine to acetophenone in leaves mainly resulted in little occurrence of 1PE in leaves. This study provided an example that differential distribution of some metabolites in plant tissues was not only determined by enzyme(s) in the last step of metabolite formation, but also can be due to substrate availability. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Integrated Analysis of the Wood Oil from Xanthocyparis vietnamensis Farjon & Hiep. by Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Techniques
Molecules 2016, 21(7), 840; doi:10.3390/molecules21070840
Received: 26 May 2016 / Revised: 20 June 2016 / Accepted: 23 June 2016 / Published: 27 June 2016
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Abstract
In order to get better knowledge about the volatiles produced by Xanthocyparis vietnamensis, a species recently discovered in Vietnam, its wood oil has been analyzed by a combination of chromatographic (GC, CC) and spectroscopic (GC-MS, 13C-NMR) techniques. Forty components that accounted for
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In order to get better knowledge about the volatiles produced by Xanthocyparis vietnamensis, a species recently discovered in Vietnam, its wood oil has been analyzed by a combination of chromatographic (GC, CC) and spectroscopic (GC-MS, 13C-NMR) techniques. Forty components that accounted for 87.9% of the oil composition have been identified. The composition is dominated by nootkatene (20.7%), 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-one (17.2%), γ-eudesmol (5.1%), nootkatone (4.7%), valencene (3.5%) and 13-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-11-one (2.6%). The structure of two new compounds—10-epi-nor-γ-eudesmen-11-one and 12-hydroxy-isodihydroagarofuran—has been elucidated, while 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-ol is reported as a natural product for the first time. The composition of X. vietnamensis wood oil varied drastically from those of leaf oils, dominated by hedycaryol (34.4%), phyllocladene (37.8%) or by pimara-6(14)-15-diene (19.4%). Full article
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Open AccessArticle Analysis of Odorants in Marking Fluid of Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) Using Simultaneous Sensory and Chemical Analysis with Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Multidimensional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Olfactometry
Molecules 2016, 21(7), 834; doi:10.3390/molecules21070834
Received: 16 May 2016 / Revised: 10 June 2016 / Accepted: 15 June 2016 / Published: 25 June 2016
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Abstract
Scent-marking is the most effective method of communication in the presence or absence of a signaler. These complex mixtures result in a multifaceted interaction triggered by the sense of smell. The objective was to identify volatile organic compound (VOC) composition and odors emitted
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Scent-marking is the most effective method of communication in the presence or absence of a signaler. These complex mixtures result in a multifaceted interaction triggered by the sense of smell. The objective was to identify volatile organic compound (VOC) composition and odors emitted by total marking fluid (MF) associated with Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica). Siberian tiger, an endangered species, was chosen because its MF had never been analyzed. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) for headspace volatile collection combined with multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry for simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses were used. Thirty-two VOCs emitted from MF were identified. 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, the sole previously identified compound responsible for the “characteristic” odor of P. tigris MF, was identified along with two additional compounds confirmed with standards (urea, furfural) and four tentatively identified compounds (3-methylbutanamine, (R)-3-methylcyclopentanone, propanedioic acid, and 3-hydroxybutanal) as being responsible for the characteristic aroma of Siberian tiger MF. Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses improved characterization of scent-markings and identified compounds not previously reported in MF of other tiger species. This research will assist animal ecologists, behaviorists, and zookeepers in understanding how scents from specific MF compounds impact tiger and wildlife communication and improve management practices related to animal behavior. Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses is applicable to unlocking scent-marking information for other species. Full article
Open AccessArticle Antispasmodic Effects and Action Mechanism of Essential Oil of Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray on Rabbit Ileum
Molecules 2016, 21(6), 783; doi:10.3390/molecules21060783
Received: 22 March 2016 / Revised: 8 June 2016 / Accepted: 12 June 2016 / Published: 16 June 2016
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Abstract
The Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray (C. mexicana) plant is used in folk medicine to treat fever and rheumatism; it is used as a diuretic, antispasmodic; and it is used for its aphrodisiac properties. This study investigates the effects of the essential oil of
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The Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray (C. mexicana) plant is used in folk medicine to treat fever and rheumatism; it is used as a diuretic, antispasmodic; and it is used for its aphrodisiac properties. This study investigates the effects of the essential oil of C. mexicana (EOCM) on the contractility of rabbit ileum and the mechanisms of action involved. Muscle contractility studies in vitro in an organ bath to evaluate the response to EOCM were performed in the rabbit ileum. EOCM (1–100 µg·mL−1) reduced the amplitude and area under the curve of spontaneous contractions of the ileum. The contractions induced by carbachol 1 µM, potassium chloride (KCl) 60 mM or Bay K8644 1 µM were reduced by EOCM (30 µg·mL−1). Apamin 1 µM and charybdotoxin 0.01 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. The d-cAMP 1 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. l-NNA 10 µM, Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS 1 µM, d,l-propargylglycine 2 mM, or aminooxyacetic acid hemihydrochloride 2 mM did not modify the EOCM effect. In conclusion, EOCM induces an antispasmodic effect and could be used in the treatment of intestinal spasms or diarrhea processes. This effect would be mediated by Ca2+, Ca2+-activated K+ channels and cAMP. Full article
Open AccessArticle Antimicrobial Activity and Modulatory Effect of Essential Oil from the Leaf of Rhaphiodon echinus (Nees & Mart) Schauer on Some Antimicrobial Drugs
Molecules 2016, 21(6), 743; doi:10.3390/molecules21060743
Received: 3 April 2016 / Revised: 30 May 2016 / Accepted: 31 May 2016 / Published: 8 June 2016
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Abstract
Background: Rhaphiodon echinus is a weed plant used in the Brazilian folk medicinal for the treatment of infectious diseases. In this study, the essential oil of R. echinus leaf was investigated for its antimicrobial properties. Methods: The chemical constituents of the
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Background: Rhaphiodon echinus is a weed plant used in the Brazilian folk medicinal for the treatment of infectious diseases. In this study, the essential oil of R. echinus leaf was investigated for its antimicrobial properties. Methods: The chemical constituents of the essential oil were characterized by GC-MS. The antimicrobial properties were determined by studying by the microdilution method the effect of the oil alone, and in combination with antifungal or antibiotic drugs against the fungi Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis and the microbes Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas. In addition, the iron (II) chelation potential of the oil was determined. Results: The results showed the presence of β-caryophyllene and bicyclogermacrene in major compounds, and revealed a low antifungal and antibacterial activity of the essential oil, but a strong modulatory effect on antimicrobial drugs when associated with the oil. The essential oil showed iron (II) chelation activity. Conclusions: The GC-MS characterization revealed the presence of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in the essential oil and metal chelation potential, which may be responsible in part for the modulatory effect of the oil. These findings suggest that essential oil of R. echinus is a natural product capable of enhancing the antibacterial and antifungal activity of antimicrobial drugs. Full article
Open AccessReview Nerolidol: A Sesquiterpene Alcohol with Multi-Faceted Pharmacological and Biological Activities
Molecules 2016, 21(5), 529; doi:10.3390/molecules21050529
Received: 24 February 2016 / Revised: 14 April 2016 / Accepted: 14 April 2016 / Published: 28 April 2016
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Abstract
Nerolidol (3,7,11-trimethyl-1,6,10-dodecatrien-3-ol) is a naturally occurring sesquiterpene alcohol that is present in various plants with a floral odor. It is synthesized as an intermediate in the production of (3E)-4,8-dimethy-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), a herbivore-induced volatile that protects plants from herbivore damage. Chemically, nerolidol
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Nerolidol (3,7,11-trimethyl-1,6,10-dodecatrien-3-ol) is a naturally occurring sesquiterpene alcohol that is present in various plants with a floral odor. It is synthesized as an intermediate in the production of (3E)-4,8-dimethy-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), a herbivore-induced volatile that protects plants from herbivore damage. Chemically, nerolidol exists in two geometric isomers, a trans and a cis form. The usage of nerolidol is widespread across different industries. It has been widely used in cosmetics (e.g., shampoos and perfumes) and in non-cosmetic products (e.g., detergents and cleansers). In fact, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also permitted the use of nerolidol as a food flavoring agent. The fact that nerolidol is a common ingredient in many products has attracted researchers to explore more medicinal properties of nerolidol that may exert beneficial effect on human health. Therefore, the aim of this review is to compile and consolidate the data on the various pharmacological and biological activities displayed by nerolidol. Furthermore, this review also includes pharmacokinetic and toxicological studies of nerolidol. In summary, the various pharmacological and biological activities demonstrated in this review highlight the prospects of nerolidol as a promising chemical or drug candidate in the field of agriculture and medicine. Full article
Open AccessArticle Effect of Food Emulsifiers on Aroma Release
Molecules 2016, 21(4), 511; doi:10.3390/molecules21040511
Received: 18 March 2016 / Revised: 9 April 2016 / Accepted: 14 April 2016 / Published: 22 April 2016
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Abstract
This study aimed to determine the influence of different emulsifiers or xanthan-emulsifier systems on the release of aroma compounds. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and GC-MS were used to study the effects of varying concentrations of xanthan gum, sucrose fatty acid ester, Tween 80 and
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This study aimed to determine the influence of different emulsifiers or xanthan-emulsifier systems on the release of aroma compounds. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and GC-MS were used to study the effects of varying concentrations of xanthan gum, sucrose fatty acid ester, Tween 80 and soybean lecithin on the release of seven aroma compounds. The effects of the emulsifier systems supplemented with xanthan gum on aroma release were also studied in the same way. The results showed varying degrees of influence of sucrose fatty acid ester, soybean lecithin, Tween 80 and xanthan gum on the release of aroma compounds. Compared with other aroma compounds, ethyl acetate was more likely to be conserved in the solution system, while the amount of limonene released was the highest among these seven aroma compounds. In conclusion, different emulsifiers and complexes showed different surface properties that tend to interact with different aroma molecules. The present studies showed that the composition and structure of emulsifiers and specific interactions between emulsifiers and aroma molecules have significant effects on aroma release. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication PTR-MS Characterization of VOCs Associated with Commercial Aromatic Bakery Yeasts of Wine and Beer Origin
Molecules 2016, 21(4), 483; doi:10.3390/molecules21040483
Received: 23 February 2016 / Revised: 6 April 2016 / Accepted: 7 April 2016 / Published: 12 April 2016
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Abstract
In light of the increasing attention towards “green” solutions to improve food quality, the use of aromatic-enhancing microorganisms offers the advantage to be a natural and sustainable solution that did not negatively influence the list of ingredients. In this study, we characterize, for
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In light of the increasing attention towards “green” solutions to improve food quality, the use of aromatic-enhancing microorganisms offers the advantage to be a natural and sustainable solution that did not negatively influence the list of ingredients. In this study, we characterize, for the first time, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with aromatic bakery yeasts. Three commercial bakery starter cultures, respectively formulated with three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from white wine, red wine, and beer, were monitored by a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), a direct injection analytical technique for detecting volatile organic compounds with high sensitivity (VOCs). Two ethanol-related peaks (m/z 65.059 and 75.080) described qualitative differences in fermentative performances. The release of compounds associated to the peaks at m/z 89.059, m/z 103.075, and m/z 117.093, tentatively identified as acetoin and esters, are coherent with claimed flavor properties of the investigated strains. We propose these mass peaks and their related fragments as biomarkers to optimize the aromatic performances of commercial preparations and for the rapid massive screening of yeast collections. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Antibacterial Activity and Action Mechanism of the Essential Oil from Enteromorpha linza L. against Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria
Molecules 2016, 21(3), 388; doi:10.3390/molecules21030388
Received: 12 February 2016 / Revised: 14 March 2016 / Accepted: 17 March 2016 / Published: 21 March 2016
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Abstract
Foodborne illness and disease caused by foodborne pathogenic bacteria is continuing to increase day by day and it has become an important topic of concern among various food industries. Many types of synthetic antibacterial agents have been used in food processing and food
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Foodborne illness and disease caused by foodborne pathogenic bacteria is continuing to increase day by day and it has become an important topic of concern among various food industries. Many types of synthetic antibacterial agents have been used in food processing and food preservation; however, they are not safe and have resulted in various health-related issues. Therefore, in the present study, essential oil from an edible seaweed, Enteromorpha linza (AEO), was evaluated for its antibacterial activity against foodborne pathogens, along with the mechanism of its antibacterial action. AEO at 25 mg/disc was highly active against Bacillus cereus (12.3–12.7 mm inhibition zone) and Staphylococcus aureus (12.7–13.3 mm inhibition zone). The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values of AEO ranged from 12.5–25 mg/mL. Further investigation of the mechanism of action of AEO revealed its strong impairing effect on the viability of bacterial cells and membrane permeability, as indicated by a significant increase in leakage of 260 nm absorbing materials and K+ ions from the cell membrane and loss of high salt tolerance. Taken together, these data suggest that AEO has the potential for use as an effective antibacterial agent that functions by impairing cell membrane permeability via morphological alternations, resulting in cellular lysis and cell death. Full article
Open AccessArticle Screening of Satureja subspicata Vis. Honey by HPLC-DAD, GC-FID/MS and UV/VIS: Prephenate Derivatives as Biomarkers
Molecules 2016, 21(3), 377; doi:10.3390/molecules21030377
Received: 27 February 2016 / Revised: 12 March 2016 / Accepted: 15 March 2016 / Published: 21 March 2016
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Abstract
The samples of Satureja subspicata Vis. honey were confirmed to be unifloral by melissopalynological analysis with the characteristic pollen share from 36% to 71%. Bioprospecting of the samples was performed by HPLC-DAD, GC-FID/MS, and UV/VIS. Prephenate derivatives were shown to be dominant by
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The samples of Satureja subspicata Vis. honey were confirmed to be unifloral by melissopalynological analysis with the characteristic pollen share from 36% to 71%. Bioprospecting of the samples was performed by HPLC-DAD, GC-FID/MS, and UV/VIS. Prephenate derivatives were shown to be dominant by the HPLC-DAD analysis, particularly phenylalanine (167.8 mg/kg) and methyl syringate (MSYR, 114.1 mg/kg), followed by tyrosine and benzoic acid. Higher amounts of MSYR (3–4 times) can be pointed out for distinguishing S. subspicata Vis. honey from other Satureja spp. honey types. GC-FID/MS analysis of ultrasonic solvent extracts of the samples revealed MSYR (46.68%, solvent pentane/Et2O 1:2 (v/v); 52.98%, solvent CH2Cl2) and minor abundance of other volatile prephenate derivatives, as well as higher aliphatic compounds characteristic of the comb environment. Two combined extracts (according to the solvents) of all samples were evaluated for their antioxidant properties by FRAP and DPPH assay; the combined extracts demonstrated higher activity (at lower concentrations) in comparison with the average honey sample. UV/VIS analysis of the samples was applied for determination of CIE Lab colour coordinates, total phenolics (425.38 mg GAE/kg), and antioxidant properties (4.26 mmol Fe2+/kg (FRAP assay) and 0.8 mmol TEAC/kg (DDPH assay)). Full article
Open AccessArticle Comparison of the Profile and Composition of Volatiles in Coniferous Needles According to Extraction Methods
Molecules 2016, 21(3), 363; doi:10.3390/molecules21030363
Received: 26 January 2016 / Revised: 29 February 2016 / Accepted: 8 March 2016 / Published: 17 March 2016
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Abstract
The enantiomeric distribution and profile of volatiles in plants, which affect the biological and organoleptic properties, can be varied depending on extraction methods as well as their cultivars. The secondary volatile components of the needles of three conifer cultivars (Chamaecyparispisifera, Chamaecyparisobtusa
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The enantiomeric distribution and profile of volatiles in plants, which affect the biological and organoleptic properties, can be varied depending on extraction methods as well as their cultivars. The secondary volatile components of the needles of three conifer cultivars (Chamaecyparispisifera, Chamaecyparisobtusa, and Thujaorientalis) were compared. Furthermore, the effects of three different extraction methods—solid-phase microextraction (SPME), steam distillation (SD), and solvent extraction (SE)—on the composition and enantiomeric distribution of those volatiles were elucidated. Monoterpene hydrocarbons predominated in all samples, and the compositions of sesquiterpenes and diterpenes differed according to the cultivar. In particular, the yields of oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were greatest for SD, whereas those of sesquiterpenes and diterpenes were highest for SE. On the other hand, more monoterpenes with higher volatility could be obtained with SPME and SD than when using SE. In addition, the enantiomeric composition of nine chiral compounds found in three cultivars differed according to their chemotype. There were also some differences in the yielded oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, but not monoterpene hydrocarbons, according to the extraction method. These results demonstrate that the extraction methods used as well as the cultivars influence the measured volatile profiles and enantiomeric distribution of coniferous needle extracts. Full article
Open AccessArticle Fumigant Toxicity of Lamiaceae Plant Essential Oils and Blends of Their Constituents against Adult Rice Weevil Sitophilus oryzae
Molecules 2016, 21(3), 361; doi:10.3390/molecules21030361
Received: 17 February 2016 / Revised: 7 March 2016 / Accepted: 10 March 2016 / Published: 16 March 2016
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Abstract
To find a new and safe alternative to conventional insecticides, we evaluated the fumigant toxicity of eight Lamiaceae essential oils and their constituents against the adult rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae. Of the eight species tested, hyssop (Hyssopus offcinalis), majoram (
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To find a new and safe alternative to conventional insecticides, we evaluated the fumigant toxicity of eight Lamiaceae essential oils and their constituents against the adult rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae. Of the eight species tested, hyssop (Hyssopus offcinalis), majoram (Origanum majorana), and Thymus zygis essential oils showed strong fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae adults at 25 mg/L air concentration. Constituents of active essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detector (FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 13, 15, and 17 compounds were identified from hyssop, majoram, and Thymus zygis essential oils, respectively. Pinocamphone and isopinocamphone were isolated by open column chromatography. Among the test compounds, pinocamphone and isopinocamphone showed the strongest fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae. Sabinene hydrate, linalool, α-terpineol, and terpinen-4-ol exhibited 100% fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae at 3.9 mg/L air concentration. The measured toxicity of the artificial blends of the constituents identified in hyssop, majoram, and Thymus zygis oils indicated that isopinocamphone, terpine-4-ol, and linalool were major contributors to the fumigant toxicity of the artificial blend, respectively. Full article
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Open AccessReview Recent Advances in Volatiles of Teas
Molecules 2016, 21(3), 338; doi:10.3390/molecules21030338
Received: 6 February 2016 / Revised: 1 March 2016 / Accepted: 4 March 2016 / Published: 11 March 2016
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Abstract
Volatile compounds are important components of tea aroma, a key attribute of sensory quality. The present review examines the formation of aromatic volatiles of various kinds of teas and factors influencing the formation of tea volatiles, including tea cultivar, growing environment and agronomic
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Volatile compounds are important components of tea aroma, a key attribute of sensory quality. The present review examines the formation of aromatic volatiles of various kinds of teas and factors influencing the formation of tea volatiles, including tea cultivar, growing environment and agronomic practices, processing method and storage of tea. The determination of tea volatiles and the relationship of active-aroma volatiles with the sensory qualities of tea are also discussed in the present paper. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Expression and Functional Activity of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R38 in Human Placental Tissues and JEG-3 Cells
Molecules 2016, 21(3), 306; doi:10.3390/molecules21030306
Received: 28 January 2016 / Revised: 24 February 2016 / Accepted: 26 February 2016 / Published: 3 March 2016
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Abstract
Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well
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Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well as in airway smooth muscle cells, in the testis and in the brain. In the present work we addressed the question if bitter taste receptors might also be expressed in other epithelial tissues as well. By staining a tissue microarray with 45 tissue spots from healthy human donors with an antibody directed against the best characterized bitter taste receptor TAS2R38, we observed an unexpected strong TAS2R38 expression in the amniotic epithelium, syncytiotrophoblast and decidua cells of the human placenta. To analyze the functionality we first determined the TAS2R38 expression in the placental cell line JEG-3. Stimulation of these cells with diphenidol, a clinically used antiemetic agent that binds TAS2Rs including TAS2R38, demonstrated the functionality of the TAS2Rs by inducing calcium influx. Restriction enzyme based detection of the TAS2R38 gene allele identified JEG-3 cells as PTC (phenylthiocarbamide)-taster cell line. Calcium influx induced by PTC in JEG-3 cells could be inhibited with the recently described TAS2R38 inhibitor probenecid and proved the specificity of the TAS2R38 activation. The expression of TAS2R38 in human placental tissues points to further new functions and hitherto unknown endogenous ligands of TAS2Rs far beyond bitter tasting. Full article
Open AccessReview Chemistry and Pharmacology of Citrus sinensis
Molecules 2016, 21(2), 247; doi:10.3390/molecules21020247
Received: 16 December 2015 / Revised: 27 January 2016 / Accepted: 9 February 2016 / Published: 22 February 2016
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Abstract
Presently the search for new drugs from natural resources is of growing interest to the pharmaceutical industry. Natural products have been the source of new drugs since ancient times. Plants are a good source of secondary metabolites which have been found to have
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Presently the search for new drugs from natural resources is of growing interest to the pharmaceutical industry. Natural products have been the source of new drugs since ancient times. Plants are a good source of secondary metabolites which have been found to have beneficial properties. The present study is a review of the chemistry and pharmacology of Citrus sinensis. This review reveals the therapeutic potential of C. sinensis as a source of natural compounds with important activities that are beneficial for human health that could be used to develop new drugs. Full article
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Open AccessReview Recent Advances in the Emission and Functions of Plant Vegetative Volatiles
Molecules 2016, 21(2), 124; doi:10.3390/molecules21020124
Received: 25 December 2015 / Revised: 11 January 2016 / Accepted: 13 January 2016 / Published: 22 January 2016
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (1831 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Plants synthesize and emit a large variety of volatile organic compounds, which possess extremely important ecological functions. In most case, most plant volatiles are liquids, rather than gases, at room temperature. Some volatiles are emitted “on demand” when plants, especially vegetative parts, are
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Plants synthesize and emit a large variety of volatile organic compounds, which possess extremely important ecological functions. In most case, most plant volatiles are liquids, rather than gases, at room temperature. Some volatiles are emitted “on demand” when plants, especially vegetative parts, are exposed to abiotic or biotic stress. In this review, we summarize some of the highlights of plant vegetative volatile emission and functions research published during the past few years. Full article

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Open AccessReview Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Fragrant Mexican Copal (Bursera spp.)
Molecules 2015, 20(12), 22383-22394; doi:10.3390/molecules201219849
Received: 15 October 2015 / Revised: 9 December 2015 / Accepted: 9 December 2015 / Published: 12 December 2015
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Abstract
Copal is the Spanish word used to describe aromatic resins from several genera of plants. Mexican copal derives from several Bursera spp., Protium copal, some Pinus spp. (e.g., P. pseudostrobus) and a few Fabaceae spp. It has been used for centuries
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Copal is the Spanish word used to describe aromatic resins from several genera of plants. Mexican copal derives from several Bursera spp., Protium copal, some Pinus spp. (e.g., P. pseudostrobus) and a few Fabaceae spp. It has been used for centuries as incense for religious ceremonies, as a food preservative, and as a treatment for several illnesses. The aim of this review is to analyze the chemical composition and biological activity of commercial Mexican Bursera copal. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Essential Oil Composition, Antioxidant, Cytotoxic and Antiviral Activities of Teucrium pseudochamaepitys Growing Spontaneously in Tunisia
Molecules 2015, 20(11), 20426-20433; doi:10.3390/molecules201119707
Received: 21 September 2015 / Revised: 2 November 2015 / Accepted: 3 November 2015 / Published: 16 November 2015
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Abstract
The chemical composition, antioxidant, cytotoxic and antiviral activities of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Teucrium pseudochamaepitys (Lamiaceae) collected from Zaghouan province of Tunisia are reported. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with a flame
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The chemical composition, antioxidant, cytotoxic and antiviral activities of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Teucrium pseudochamaepitys (Lamiaceae) collected from Zaghouan province of Tunisia are reported. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty-one compounds were identified representing 88.6% of the total essential oil. Hexadecanoic acid was found to be the most abundant component (26.1%) followed by caryophyllene oxide (6.3%), myristicin (4.9%) and α-cubebene (3.9%). The antioxidant capacity of the oil was measured on the basis of the scavenging activity to the stable 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The IC50 value of the oil was evaluated as 0.77 mg·mL−1. In addition, the essential oil was found to possess moderate cytotoxic effects on the HEp-2 cell line (50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) = 653.6 µg·mL−1). The potential antiviral effect was tested against Coxsackievirus B (CV-B), a significant human and mouse pathogen that causes pediatric central nervous system disease, commonly with acute syndromes. The reduction of viral infectivity by the essential oil was measured using a cytopathic (CPE) reduction assay. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Occurrence of Propyl Lactate in Chinese Baijius (Chinese Liquors) Detected by Direct Injection Coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Molecules 2015, 20(10), 19002-19013; doi:10.3390/molecules201019002
Received: 1 September 2015 / Revised: 7 October 2015 / Accepted: 13 October 2015 / Published: 19 October 2015
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Abstract
As one of the oldest distillates in the world, flavor compounds of Chinese Baijiu (Chinese liquor) were extremely complex. Propyl lactate was firstly detected by direct injection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in 72 Chinese Baijius. The objectives were to detect the contents
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As one of the oldest distillates in the world, flavor compounds of Chinese Baijiu (Chinese liquor) were extremely complex. Propyl lactate was firstly detected by direct injection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in 72 Chinese Baijius. The objectives were to detect the contents of propyl lactate and evaluate its contribution to the aroma of Chinese Baijiu based on odor activity values (OAVs). The levels of propyl lactate in these distillates were determined by internal standard method and selective ion monitoring (SIM), which ranged from 0.050 to 1.900 mg∙L−1 under investigation. Its detection threshold was determined by Three-Alternative Forced-Choice (3-AFC) and curve fitting (CF), which was 0.740 mg∙L−1 in 38% ethanol solution. The contribution of propyl lactate on the aroma of these distillate drinks was evaluated by their odor activity values (OAVs), which varied from 0.066 to 4.440. The OAVs of propyl lactate were found to exceed 1 in 13 Chinese Baijius, including 50° Jingzhi Guniang 5 years (4.440), 52° Jingzhi Guniang 10 years (3.024), Jingyanggang (2.568), Xianghe Ronghe Shaofang (2.313), and 1956 Laolang (1.431), which indicated that propyl lactate was one of odor-active components in these Chinese Baijius. Full article
Open AccessArticle Contribution of Bacillus Isolates to the Flavor Profiles of Vanilla Beans Assessed through Aroma Analysis and Chemometrics
Molecules 2015, 20(10), 18422-18436; doi:10.3390/molecules201018422
Received: 5 August 2015 / Revised: 11 September 2015 / Accepted: 17 September 2015 / Published: 9 October 2015
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Abstract
Colonizing Bacillus in vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) beans is involved in glucovanillin hydrolysis and vanillin formation during conventional curing. The flavor profiles of vanilla beans under Bacillus-assisted curing were analyzed through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, electronic nose, and quantitative sensory analysis. The
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Colonizing Bacillus in vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) beans is involved in glucovanillin hydrolysis and vanillin formation during conventional curing. The flavor profiles of vanilla beans under Bacillus-assisted curing were analyzed through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, electronic nose, and quantitative sensory analysis. The flavor profiles were analytically compared among the vanilla beans under Bacillus-assisted curing, conventional curing, and non-microorganism-assisted curing. Vanilla beans added with Bacillus vanillea XY18 and Bacillus subtilis XY20 contained higher vanillin (3.58% ± 0.05% and 3.48% ± 0.10%, respectively) than vanilla beans that underwent non-microorganism-assisted curing and conventional curing (3.09% ± 0.14% and 3.21% ± 0.15%, respectively). Forty-two volatiles were identified from endogenous vanilla metabolism. Five other compounds were identified from exogenous Bacillus metabolism. Electronic nose data confirmed that vanilla flavors produced through the different curing processes were easily distinguished. Quantitative sensory analysis confirmed that Bacillus-assisted curing increased vanillin production without generating any unpleasant sensory attribute. Partial least squares regression further provided a correlation model of different measurements. Overall, we comparatively analyzed the flavor profiles of vanilla beans under Bacillus-assisted curing, indirectly demonstrated the mechanism of vanilla flavor formation by microbes. Full article
Open AccessArticle Characterization of Fatty Acid, Amino Acid and Volatile Compound Compositions and Bioactive Components of Seven Coffee (Coffea robusta) Cultivars Grown in Hainan Province, China
Molecules 2015, 20(9), 16687-16708; doi:10.3390/molecules200916687
Received: 27 July 2015 / Revised: 26 August 2015 / Accepted: 2 September 2015 / Published: 14 September 2015
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Abstract
Compositions of fatty acid, amino acids, and volatile compound were investigated in green coffee beans of seven cultivars of Coffea robusta grown in Hainan Province, China. The chlorogenic acids, trigonelline, caffeine, total lipid, and total protein contents as well as color parameters were
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Compositions of fatty acid, amino acids, and volatile compound were investigated in green coffee beans of seven cultivars of Coffea robusta grown in Hainan Province, China. The chlorogenic acids, trigonelline, caffeine, total lipid, and total protein contents as well as color parameters were measured. Chemometric techniques, principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and analysis of one-way variance (ANOVA) were performed on the complete data set to reveal chemical differences among all cultivars and identify markers characteristic of a particular botanical origin of the coffee. The major fatty acids of coffee were linoleic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, and arachic acid. Leucine (0.84 g/100 g DW), lysine (0.63 g/100 g DW), and arginine (0.61 g/100 g DW) were the predominant essential amino acids (EAAs) in the coffee samples. Seventy-nine volatile compounds were identified and semi-quantified by HS-SPME/GC-MS. PCA of the complete data matrix demonstrated that there were significant differences among all cultivars, HCA supported the results of PCA and achieved a satisfactory classification performance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Extractions of Oil from Descurainia sophia Seed Using Supercritical CO2, Chemical Compositions by GC-MS and Evaluation of the Anti-Tussive, Expectorant and Anti-Asthmatic Activities
Molecules 2015, 20(7), 13296-13312; doi:10.3390/molecules200713296
Received: 19 May 2015 / Revised: 13 July 2015 / Accepted: 13 July 2015 / Published: 22 July 2015
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Abstract
Descurainia sophia is widely distributed in China and is one of the most troublesome annual weeds. It has diverse medicinal usage. D. sophia has abundant oil, making it an important oil plant in China. The main goal of this study was to obtain
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Descurainia sophia is widely distributed in China and is one of the most troublesome annual weeds. It has diverse medicinal usage. D. sophia has abundant oil, making it an important oil plant in China. The main goal of this study was to obtain the maximum yield of the oil by an optimal selection of supercritical fluid extraction parameters. According to the central composite design and response surface methodology for supercritical fluid extraction method, a quadratic polynomial model was used to predict the yield of D. sophia seed oil. A series of runs was performed to assess the optimal extraction conditions. The results indicated that the extraction pressure had the greatest impact on oil yield within the range of the operating conditions studied. A total of approximately 67 compounds were separated in D. sophia seed oil by GC-MS, of which 51 compounds represented 98.21% of the total oils, for the first time. This study was also aimed at evaluating the anti-asthmatic, anti-tussive and expectorant activities in vivo of D. sophia seed oil which supplied for further research on bioactive constituents and pharmacological mechanisms. Full article
Open AccessReview Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Carotenoid-Derived Flavours and Fragrances
Molecules 2015, 20(7), 12817-12840; doi:10.3390/molecules200712817
Received: 14 May 2015 / Revised: 2 July 2015 / Accepted: 8 July 2015 / Published: 15 July 2015
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Abstract
Carotenoids are important isoprenoid compounds whose oxidative degradation produces a plethora of smaller derivatives, called apocarotenoids, which possess a range of different chemical structures and biological activities. Among these natural products, compounds having less than 15 carbon atoms in their frameworks are often
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Carotenoids are important isoprenoid compounds whose oxidative degradation produces a plethora of smaller derivatives, called apocarotenoids, which possess a range of different chemical structures and biological activities. Among these natural products, compounds having less than 15 carbon atoms in their frameworks are often relevant flavours or fragrances and their manufacturing represents an important economic resource for chemical companies. The strict correlation between stereochemical structure and odour has made the stereospecific synthesis of the latter biological active compounds increasingly important. In this review, the recent advances on the synthesis of the most relevant carotenoid-derived flavours and fragrances are discussed. In particular, the new synthetic methods that have given new and innovative perspectives from a scientific standpoint and the preparative approaches that might possess industrial importance are described thoroughly. Full article
Open AccessArticle Chemical Composition and Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities of an Essential Oil Extracted from an Edible Seaweed, Laminaria japonica L.
Molecules 2015, 20(7), 12093-12113; doi:10.3390/molecules200712093
Received: 20 April 2015 / Revised: 23 June 2015 / Accepted: 25 June 2015 / Published: 2 July 2015
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Abstract
Laminaria japonica L. is among the most commonly consumed seaweeds in northeast Asia. In the present study, L. japonica essential oil (LJEO) was extracted by microwave-hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. LJEO contained 21 volatile compounds, comprising 99.76% of the
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Laminaria japonica L. is among the most commonly consumed seaweeds in northeast Asia. In the present study, L. japonica essential oil (LJEO) was extracted by microwave-hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. LJEO contained 21 volatile compounds, comprising 99.76% of the total volume of the essential oil, primarily tetradeconoic acid (51.75%), hexadecanoic acid (16.57%), (9Z,12Z)-9,12-Octadecadienoic acid (12.09%), and (9Z)-hexadec-9-enoic acid (9.25%). Evaluation of the antibacterial potential against three foodborne pathogens, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10876, Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43890, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 49444, revealed that LJEO at a concentration of 25 mg/paper disc exerted high antibacterial activity against S. aureus (11.5 ± 0.58 mm inhibition zone) and B. cereus (10.5 ± 0.57 mm inhibition zone), but no inhibition of E. coli O157:H7. LJEO also displayed DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging activity (80.45%), superoxide anion scavenging activity (54.03%), and ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radical and hydroxyl radical scavenging at 500 µg/mL. Finally, LJEO showed high inhibition of lipid peroxidation with strong reducing power. In conclusion, LJEO from edible seaweed is an inexpensive but favorable resource with strong antibacterial capacity as well as free radical scavenging and antioxidant activity; therefore, it has the potential for use in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Full article
Open AccessArticle Characterization of Volatile Compounds of Eleven Achillea Species from Turkey and Biological Activities of Essential Oil and Methanol Extract of A. hamzaoglui Arabacı & Budak
Molecules 2015, 20(6), 11432-11458; doi:10.3390/molecules200611432
Received: 9 April 2015 / Revised: 10 June 2015 / Accepted: 17 June 2015 / Published: 22 June 2015
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Abstract
According to distribution of genus Achillea, two main centers of diversity occur in S.E. Europe and S.W. Asia. Diversified essential oil compositions from Balkan Peninsula have been numerously reported. However, report on essential oils of Achillea species growing in Turkey, which is
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According to distribution of genus Achillea, two main centers of diversity occur in S.E. Europe and S.W. Asia. Diversified essential oil compositions from Balkan Peninsula have been numerously reported. However, report on essential oils of Achillea species growing in Turkey, which is one of the main centers of diversity, is very limited. This paper represents the chemical compositions of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of eleven Achillea species, identified simultaneously by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main components were found to be 1,8-cineole, p-cymene, viridiflorol, nonacosane, α-bisabolol, caryophyllene oxide, α-bisabolon oxide A, β-eudesmol, 15-hexadecanolide and camphor. The chemical principal component analysis based on thirty compounds identified three species groups and a subgroup, where each group constituted a chemotype. This is the first report on the chemical composition of A. hamzaoglui essential oil; as well as the antioxidant and antimicrobial evaluation of its essential oil and methanolic extract. Full article
Open AccessArticle Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Cinnamyl Long Chain Aroma Esters
Molecules 2015, 20(6), 10594-10603; doi:10.3390/molecules200610594
Received: 4 May 2015 / Revised: 24 May 2015 / Accepted: 1 June 2015 / Published: 8 June 2015
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Abstract
Cinnamyl long chain aroma esters were prepared by using the conventional and microwave-assisted methods. The esterification reaction of naturally occurring 3-phenyl-prop-2-en-1-ol and different chain lengths acidic and diol reagents was carried out at the temperature of 140 °C under solvent free conditions. As
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Cinnamyl long chain aroma esters were prepared by using the conventional and microwave-assisted methods. The esterification reaction of naturally occurring 3-phenyl-prop-2-en-1-ol and different chain lengths acidic and diol reagents was carried out at the temperature of 140 °C under solvent free conditions. As acidic reagents, oxolane-2,5-dione, oxane-2,6-dione, hexanedioic acid and decanedioic acid were applied. Ethane-1,2-diol and 2,2ʹ-[oxybis(2,1-ethandiyloxy)]diethanol were used as diol reagents. The synthesis of high molecular mass cinnamyl esters under conventional method conditions requires a long time to obtain high yields. The studies confirm that by using microwave irradiation, it is possible to reduce the reaction times to only 10–20 min. The structures of prepared esters were confirmed on the basis of FTIR, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. In addition, the newly obtained cinnamyl long chain esters were tested for their thermal properties. The TG studies proved the high thermal resistance of the obtained esters under inert and oxidative conditions. Full article
Open AccessReview Non-Conventional Yeasts Whole Cells as Efficient Biocatalysts for the Production of Flavors and Fragrances
Molecules 2015, 20(6), 10377-10398; doi:10.3390/molecules200610377
Received: 12 May 2015 / Revised: 31 May 2015 / Accepted: 1 June 2015 / Published: 4 June 2015
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Abstract
The rising consumer requests for natural flavors and fragrances have generated great interest in the aroma industry to seek new methods to obtain fragrance and flavor compounds naturally. An alternative and attractive route for these compounds is based on bio-transformations. In this review,
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The rising consumer requests for natural flavors and fragrances have generated great interest in the aroma industry to seek new methods to obtain fragrance and flavor compounds naturally. An alternative and attractive route for these compounds is based on bio-transformations. In this review, the application of biocatalysis by Non Conventional Yeasts (NCYs) whole cells for the production of flavor and fragrances is illustrated by a discussion of the production of different class of compounds, namely Aldehydes, Ketones and related compounds, Alcohols, Lactones, Terpenes and Terpenoids, Alkenes, and Phenols. Full article
Open AccessArticle An Effective Quality Control of Pharmacologically Active Volatiles of Houttuynia cordata Thunb by Fast Gas Chromatography-Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor
Molecules 2015, 20(6), 10298-10312; doi:10.3390/molecules200610298
Received: 31 March 2015 / Accepted: 19 May 2015 / Published: 3 June 2015
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Abstract
Fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been applied for the detection of the pharmacological volatiles emanated from Houttuynia cordata Thunb which is from South Korea. H. cordata Thunb with unpleasant and fishy odors shows a variety of pharmacological activities such as
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Fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been applied for the detection of the pharmacological volatiles emanated from Houttuynia cordata Thunb which is from South Korea. H. cordata Thunb with unpleasant and fishy odors shows a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and insect repellent. The aim of this study is to show a novel quality control by GC/SAW methodology for the discrimination of the three different parts of the plant such as leaves, aerial stems, and underground stems for H. cordata Thunb. Sixteen compounds were identified. β-Myrcene, cis-ocimene and decanal are the dominant volatiles for leaves (71.0%) and aerial stems (50.1%). While, monoterpenes (74.6%) are the dominant volatiles for underground stems. 2-Undecanone (1.3%) and lauraldehyde (3.5%) were found to be the characteristic components for leaves. Each part of the plant has its own characteristic fragrance pattern owing to its individual chemical compositions. Moreover, its individual characteristic fragrance patterns are conducive to discrimination of the three different parts of the plant. Consequently, fast GC/SAW can be a useful analytical method for quality control of the different parts of the plant with pharmacological volatiles as it provides second unit analysis, a simple and fragrant pattern recognition. Full article
Open AccessArticle Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activity of Essential Oil of Six Pinus Taxa Native to China
Molecules 2015, 20(5), 9380-9392; doi:10.3390/molecules20059380
Received: 12 March 2015 / Accepted: 19 May 2015 / Published: 21 May 2015
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Abstract
The essential oils obtained by steam distillation from needles of six China endemic Pinus taxa (P. tabulaeformis, P. tabulaeformis f. shekanensis, P. tabulaeformis var. mukdensis, P. tabulaeformis var. umbraculifera, P. henryi and P
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The essential oils obtained by steam distillation from needles of six China endemic Pinus taxa (P. tabulaeformis, P. tabulaeformis f. shekanensis, P. tabulaeformis var. mukdensis, P. tabulaeformis var. umbraculifera, P. henryi and P. massoniana) were analysed by GC/MS. A total of 72 components were separated and identified by GC/MS from the six taxa. The major constituents of the essential oils were: α-pinene (6.78%–20.55%), bornyl acetale (3.32%–12.71%), β-caryophellene (18.26%–26.31%), α-guaiene (1.23%–8.19%), and germacrene D (1.26%–9.93%). Moreover, the essential oils were evaluated for antioxidant potential by three assays (DPPH, FRAP and ABTS) and tested for their total phenolic content. The results showed that all essential oils exhibited acceptable antioxidant activities and these strongly suggest that these pine needles may serve as a potential source of natural antioxidants for food and medical purposes. Full article
Open AccessReview A Comprehensive Review on the Phytochemical Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Pogostemon cablin Benth.: An Aromatic Medicinal Plant of Industrial Importance
Molecules 2015, 20(5), 8521-8547; doi:10.3390/molecules20058521
Received: 16 March 2015 / Revised: 21 April 2015 / Accepted: 22 April 2015 / Published: 12 May 2015
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Abstract
Pogostemon cablin Benth. (patchouli) is an important herb which possesses many therapeutic properties and is widely used in the fragrance industries. In traditional medicinal practices, it is used to treat colds, headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, insect and snake bites. In
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Pogostemon cablin Benth. (patchouli) is an important herb which possesses many therapeutic properties and is widely used in the fragrance industries. In traditional medicinal practices, it is used to treat colds, headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, insect and snake bites. In aromatherapy, patchouli oil is used to relieve depression, stress, calm nerves, control appetite and to improve sexual interest. Till now more than 140 compounds, including terpenoids, phytosterols, flavonoids, organic acids, lignins, alkaloids, glycosides, alcohols, aldehydes have been isolated and identified from patchouli. The main phytochemical compounds are patchouli alcohol, α-patchoulene, β-patchoulene, α-bulnesene, seychellene, norpatchoulenol, pogostone, eugenol and pogostol. Modern studies have revealed several biological activities such as antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antithrombotic, aphrodisiac, antidepressant, antimutagenic, antiemetic, fibrinolytic and cytotoxic activities. However, some of the traditional uses need to be verified and may require standardizing and authenticating the bioactivity of purified compounds through scientific methods. The aim of the present review is to provide comprehensive knowledge on the phytochemistry and pharmacological activities of essential oil and different plant extracts of patchouli based on the available scientific literature. This information will provide a potential guide in exploring the use of main active compounds of patchouli in various medical fields. Full article
Open AccessReview Cymbopogon Species; Ethnopharmacology, Phytochemistry and the Pharmacological Importance
Molecules 2015, 20(5), 7438-7453; doi:10.3390/molecules20057438
Received: 25 January 2015 / Revised: 12 March 2015 / Accepted: 25 March 2015 / Published: 23 April 2015
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (708 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cymbopogon genus is a member of the family of Gramineae which are herbs known worldwide for their high essential oil content. They are widely distributed across all continents where they are used for various purposes. The commercial and medicinal uses of the various
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Cymbopogon genus is a member of the family of Gramineae which are herbs known worldwide for their high essential oil content. They are widely distributed across all continents where they are used for various purposes. The commercial and medicinal uses of the various species of Cymbopogon are well documented. Ethnopharmacology evidence shows that they possess a wide array of properties that justifies their use for pest control, in cosmetics and as anti-inflammation agents. These plants may also hold promise as potent anti-tumor and chemopreventive drugs. The chemo-types from this genus have been used as biomarkers for their identification and classification. Pharmacological applications of Cymbopogon citratus are well exploited, though studies show that other species may also useful pharmaceutically. Hence this literature review intends to discuss these species and explore their potential economic importance. Full article
Open AccessArticle A Three-Enzyme-System to Degrade Curcumin to Natural Vanillin
Molecules 2015, 20(4), 6640-6653; doi:10.3390/molecules20046640
Received: 18 February 2015 / Revised: 23 March 2015 / Accepted: 7 April 2015 / Published: 14 April 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (644 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The symmetrical structure of curcumin includes two 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl substructures. Laccase catalyzed formation of a phenol radical, radical migration and oxygen insertion at the benzylic positions can result in the formation of vanillin. As vanillin itself is a preferred phenolic substrate of laccases, the
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The symmetrical structure of curcumin includes two 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl substructures. Laccase catalyzed formation of a phenol radical, radical migration and oxygen insertion at the benzylic positions can result in the formation of vanillin. As vanillin itself is a preferred phenolic substrate of laccases, the formation of vanillin oligomers and polymers is inevitable, once vanillin becomes liberated. To decelerate the oligomerization, one of the phenolic hydroxyl groups was protected via acetylation. Monoacetyl curcumin with an approximate molar yield of 49% was the major acetylation product, when a lipase from Candida antarctica (CAL) was used. In the second step, monoacetyl curcumin was incubated with purified laccases of various basidiomycete fungi in a biphasic system (diethyl ether/aqueous buffer). A laccase from Funalia trogii (LccFtr) resulted in a high conversion (46% molar yield of curcumin monoacetate) to vanillin acetate. The non-protected vanillin moiety reacted to a mixture of higher molecular products. In the third step, the protecting group was removed from vanillin acetate using a feruloyl esterase from Pleurotus eryngii (PeFaeA) (68% molar yield). Alignment of the amino acid sequences indicated that high potential laccases performed better in this mediator and cofactor-free reaction. Full article
Open AccessArticle Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of the Essential Oil of Skimmia laureola Leaves
Molecules 2015, 20(3), 4735-4745; doi:10.3390/molecules20034735
Received: 22 January 2015 / Revised: 10 March 2015 / Accepted: 12 March 2015 / Published: 16 March 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (768 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The composition of the essential oil from leaves of Skimmia laureola was determined by GC and GC-MS. Twenty-eight components were identified, accounting for 93.9% of the total oil. The oil is mainly composed of monoterpenes (93.5%), of which monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes
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The composition of the essential oil from leaves of Skimmia laureola was determined by GC and GC-MS. Twenty-eight components were identified, accounting for 93.9% of the total oil. The oil is mainly composed of monoterpenes (93.5%), of which monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes represent 11.0% and 82.5%, respectively. Sesquiterpenes constitute only 0.3% of the total oil. Linalyl acetate is the main component (50.5%), with linalool (13.1%), geranyl acetate (8.5%) and cis-p-menth-2-en-1-ol (6.2%) as other principal constituents. The essential oil showed a significant antispasmodic activity, in a dose range of 0.03–10 mg/mL. The essential oil also possesses antibacterial and antifungal activities against some pathogenic strains. The phytotoxic and cytotoxic activities were also assessed. Full article
Open AccessArticle Nutritional Value and Volatile Compounds of Black Cherry (Prunus serotina) Seeds
Molecules 2015, 20(2), 3479-3495; doi:10.3390/molecules20023479
Received: 4 January 2015 / Revised: 10 February 2015 / Accepted: 11 February 2015 / Published: 17 February 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (733 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Prunus serotina (black cherry), commonly known in Mexico as capulín, is used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal diseases. Particularly, P. serotina seeds, consumed in Mexico as snacks, are used for treating cough. In the present study,
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Prunus serotina (black cherry), commonly known in Mexico as capulín, is used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal diseases. Particularly, P. serotina seeds, consumed in Mexico as snacks, are used for treating cough. In the present study, nutritional and volatile analyses of black cherry seeds were carried out to determine their nutraceutical potential. Proximate analysis indicated that P. serotina raw and toasted seeds contain mostly fat, followed by protein, fiber, carbohydrates, and ash. The potassium content in black cherry raw and toasted seeds is high, and their protein digestibility-corrected amino acid scores suggest that they might represent a complementary source of proteins. Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography/flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry analysis allowed identification of 59 and 99 volatile compounds in the raw and toasted seeds, respectively. The major volatile compounds identified in raw and toasted seeds were 2,3-butanediol and benzaldehyde, which contribute to the flavor and odor of the toasted seeds. Moreover, it has been previously demonstrated that benzaldehyde possesses a significant vasodilator effect, therefore, the presence of this compound along with oleic, linoleic, and α-eleostearic fatty acids indicate that black cherry seeds consumption might have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. Full article
Open AccessArticle Contact Toxicity and Repellency of the Essential Oil of Liriope muscari (DECN.) Bailey against Three Insect Tobacco Storage Pests
Molecules 2015, 20(1), 1676-1685; doi:10.3390/molecules20011676
Received: 13 December 2014 / Accepted: 15 January 2015 / Published: 20 January 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (685 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In order to find and develop new botanical pesticides against tobacco storage pests, bioactivity screening was performed. The essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of Liriope muscari was investigated by GC/MS and GC/FID. A total of 14 components representing 96.12% of the
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In order to find and develop new botanical pesticides against tobacco storage pests, bioactivity screening was performed. The essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of Liriope muscari was investigated by GC/MS and GC/FID. A total of 14 components representing 96.12% of the oil were identified and the main compounds in the oil were found to be methyl eugenol (42.15%) and safrole (17.15%), followed by myristicin (14.18%) and 3,5-dimethoxytoluene (10.60%). After screening, the essential oil exhibit potential insecticidal activity. In the progress of assay, it showed that the essential oil exhibited potent contact toxicity against Tribolium castaneum, Lasioderma serricorne and Liposcelis bostrychophila adults, with LD50 values of 13.36, 11.28 µg/adult and 21.37 µg/cm2, respectively. The essential oil also exhibited strong repellency against the three stored product insects. At the same concentrations, the essential oil was more repellent to T. castaneum than to L. serricorne adults. The results indicate that the essential oil of Liriope muscari has potential to be developed into a natural insecticide or repellent for controlling insects in stored tobacco and traditional Chinese medicinal materials. Full article
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