Special Issue "Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis"

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A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michael North
School of Chemistry, Bedson Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Website: http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/michael.north/
E-Mail: michael.north@ncl.ac.uk
Interests: catalytic asymmetric synthesis; carbon-carbon bonds formation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Asymmetric catalysis has a long a distinguished history (well over 100 years), yet it remains at the forefront of chemical research. Not only do chemists constantly seek to improve catalysts activity and enantioselectivity and to broaden their substrate scope, but catalysts for new reactions are constantly being developed and progress is being made in unconventional use of asymmetric catalysts, for example in cascade sequences and under unconventional reaction conditions (flow reactors, green solvents etc). The application of asymmetric catalysts under these conditions often requires their structural modification and/or immobilization. Thus, asymmetric catalysis encompasses both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and aspects of chemical engineering are becoming increasingly relevant to the large scale application of asymmetric catalysts. Our depth of understanding of mechanisms in asymmetric catalysis is also rapidly increasing aided by the introduction of powerful new experimental and computational tools. Especially notable over the last ten years has been the renaissance of asymmetric organocatalysis.

Asymmetric catalysis also plays a central role in many other areas of chemistry. The pharmaceutical industry is steadily making increasing use of asymmetric catalysis as an attractive alternative to other more wasteful methods for the preparation of enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals. Catalysis in general and asymmetric catalysis in particular is central to Green chemistry and the whole of biological chemistry is essentially the chemistry of Nature’s own asymmetric catalysts – enzymes. Indeed one of the currently unsolved major questions in science – how was life able to exploit enantiomerically pure building blocks? Is at least partly a question for asymmetric catalysis to answer through non-linear effects and autocatalytic asymmetric induction.

The aim of this special issue of Molecules is to bring together new research in the development and application of asymmetric catalysis to illustrate the state of the art. Work in all areas of asymmetric catalysis is welcome including, but not limited too:

  • Development of metal based catalysts
  • Development of organocatalysts and organocatalysed reactions
  • Asymmetric Lewis base catalysis
  • Enzyme catalysis
  • Mechanistic studies on the mode of action of asymmetric catalysts
  • Theoretical studies on asymmetric catalysis
  • Application of asymmetric catalysis in synthesis
  • Use of asymmetric catalysts in non-conventional solvents and reactors

I strongly encourage authors to submit their work to this special issue of Molecules and look forward to reading their contributions.

Prof. Dr. Michael North
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • asymmetric
  • catalysis
  • metal
  • organocatalyst
  • chiral-ligand

Published Papers (8 papers)

Molecules 2011, 16(7), 5938-5962; doi:10.3390/molecules16075938
Received: 2 June 2011; in revised form: 7 July 2011 / Accepted: 13 July 2011 / Published: 15 July 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (756 KB)

Molecules 2011, 16(7), 5460-5495; doi:10.3390/molecules16075460
Received: 25 May 2011; in revised form: 14 June 2011 / Accepted: 17 June 2011 / Published: 28 June 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (821 KB)

Molecules 2011, 16(7), 5387-5401; doi:10.3390/molecules16075387
Received: 30 May 2011; in revised form: 20 June 2011 / Accepted: 23 June 2011 / Published: 27 June 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (222 KB)

Molecules 2011, 16(6), 5298-5314; doi:10.3390/molecules16065298
Received: 26 May 2011; in revised form: 17 June 2011 / Accepted: 22 June 2011 / Published: 23 June 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (235 KB)
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Molecules 2011, 16(6), 5020-5034; doi:10.3390/molecules16065020
Received: 31 May 2011; in revised form: 13 June 2011 / Accepted: 15 June 2011 / Published: 17 June 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (266 KB)
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Molecules 2011, 16(6), 5008-5019; doi:10.3390/molecules16065008
Received: 1 June 2011; in revised form: 10 June 2011 / Accepted: 15 June 2011 / Published: 17 June 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (211 KB)

Molecules 2011, 16(4), 3420-3432; doi:10.3390/molecules16043420
Received: 6 April 2011; in revised form: 19 April 2011 / Accepted: 20 April 2011 / Published: 21 April 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (214 KB)
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Molecules 2011, 16(4), 2971-2981; doi:10.3390/molecules16042971
Received: 24 December 2010; in revised form: 15 March 2011 / Accepted: 16 March 2011 / Published: 6 April 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (238 KB)

Last update: 4 March 2014

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