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Special Issue "Progress in Silicon and Organosilicon Chemistry"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Organic Synthesis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Shengyu Feng

Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250199, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: organsilicon chemistry; organosilicon polymer; polymer chemistry; polymer materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Qingzeng Zhu

Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250199, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: organosilicon polymers; polymer biomaterials; high-perfomance polymers
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Caihong Xu

Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: silicon-based polymers; polymer precursors for advanced ceramics; elemental organic functional materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chunming Cui

Nankai University, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: silicon; boron; main group chemistry; organometallics; catalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The international symposium on silicon chemistry (ISOS) represents the highest level of international conferences regarding worldwide research and technical developments in the area of silicon and organosilicon chemistry. ISOS is held triennially at various places around the world. The 1st ISOS was held in 1964, and ISOS has been successfully held 17 times. The 18th ISOS (ISOS-XVIII) will be hosted by Shandong University in China. Meanwhile, the 6th Asian Silicon Symposium (ASiS-6) will be jointly held with this symposium. ISOS XVIII JINAN 2017 and ASiS-6 will bring together scientists, industrial researchers, and students from around the globe in order to present and discuss the latest and most exciting aspects of silicon, organosilicon chemistry, and related materials. This symposium is also beneficial for expanding the application prospects of silicone technology, and promotes the advancements of science, technology, and industry.

The Special Issue will focus on progress in silicon and organosilicon chemistry. Welcome submission of unpublished original work on silicon, organosilicon chemistry and related materials. The manuscript submission dealine is set for 30 September 2017.

For more details on ISOS-XVIII and ASiS-6, please click on: http://www.isos2017.cn.

Prof. Dr. Shengyu Feng
Prof. Dr. Qingzeng Zhu
Prof. Dr. Caihong Xu
Prof. Dr. Chunming Cui
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Silicon
  • Siloxane
  • Organosilicone
  • Organosilicon Chemistry
  • Polysiloxane
  • Silsequioxane
  • Silane

Related Special Issues

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Synthesis of Siloxyalumoxanes and Alumosiloxanes Based on Organosilicon Diols
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1776; doi:10.3390/molecules22101776
Received: 27 September 2017 / Revised: 12 October 2017 / Accepted: 18 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
PDF Full-text (2437 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We have drawn a few interesting conclusions while studying reaction products of Ph2Si(OH)2 with Al(iBu)3 and tetraisobutylalumoxane. In the first place, this is the production (at a Ph2Si(OH)2 and Al(iBu)3 equimolar
[...] Read more.
We have drawn a few interesting conclusions while studying reaction products of Ph2Si(OH)2 with Al(iBu)3 and tetraisobutylalumoxane. In the first place, this is the production (at a Ph2Si(OH)2 and Al(iBu)3 equimolar ratio) of an oligomer siloxyalumoxane structure with alternating four- and six-member rings. In addition, it shows isobutyl and phenyl group migration between aluminum and silicon due to the formation of an intramolecular four-member cyclic complex [Ph2(OH)SiO]Al(iBu)2 → [(iBu)Ph(OH)SiO]Al(iBu)Ph. Ph2Si(OH)2 interaction with Al(iBu)3 not only starts from intramolecular complex production, but the chain is terminated for the same reason, which in the case of the Ph2Si(OH)2 reaction with tetraisobutylalumoxane results in failure of to obtain high-polymer siloxyalumoxane compounds. When Al(iBu)3 interacts with α- and γ-diols, no oligomer compounds are produced. In the Al(iBu)3 reaction with α, γ-diols are created in monomer compounds that are likely to have a cyclic structure. Notably, when Al(iBu)3 interacts with only α-diol, a double excess of Al(iBu)3 allows for full replacement of hydrogen in the α-diol hydroxyl groups by aluminum alkyl residue with 1,3-bis(diisobutylalumoxymethyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane production. At an equimolar ratio of initial reagents, the second isobutyl radical at Al does not interact with the second hydroxyl group of α-diol, apparently due to the steric hindrance, and 1-(diisobutylalumoxymethyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-disiloxane is produced. Al(iBu)3 reactions with γ-diol also result in monomer compounds, but the presence of a chain consisting of three CH2-groups between Si and the hydroxyl group facilitates interaction between the second hydroxyl group of γ-diol and the second isobutyl radical Al(iBu)3. Tetraisobutylalumoxane reactions with α- and γ-diols result in oligomer compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in Silicon and Organosilicon Chemistry)
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Open AccessArticle Cs2CO3-Initiated Trifluoro-Methylation of Chalcones and Ketones for Practical Synthesis of Trifluoromethylated Tertiary Silyl Ethers
Molecules 2017, 22(5), 769; doi:10.3390/molecules22050769
Received: 27 February 2017 / Revised: 17 April 2017 / Accepted: 5 May 2017 / Published: 18 May 2017
PDF Full-text (2074 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
It was found that 1,2-trifluoromethylation reactions of ketones, enones, and aldehydes were easily accomplished using the Prakash reagent in the presence of catalytic amounts of cesium carbonate, which represents an experimentally convenient, atom-economic process for this anionic trifluoromethylation of non-enolisable aldehydes and ketones.
[...] Read more.
It was found that 1,2-trifluoromethylation reactions of ketones, enones, and aldehydes were easily accomplished using the Prakash reagent in the presence of catalytic amounts of cesium carbonate, which represents an experimentally convenient, atom-economic process for this anionic trifluoromethylation of non-enolisable aldehydes and ketones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in Silicon and Organosilicon Chemistry)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Synthesis and Properties of MQ Copolymers: Current State of Knowledge
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1768; doi:10.3390/molecules22101768
Received: 21 September 2017 / Revised: 13 October 2017 / Accepted: 15 October 2017 / Published: 23 October 2017
PDF Full-text (1481 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this review, we discuss currently available studies on the synthesis and properties of MQ copolymers. The data on methods of producing hydrolytic and heterofunctional polycondensation of functional organosilanes as well as the obtaining MQ copolymers based on silicic acids and nature silicates
[...] Read more.
In this review, we discuss currently available studies on the synthesis and properties of MQ copolymers. The data on methods of producing hydrolytic and heterofunctional polycondensation of functional organosilanes as well as the obtaining MQ copolymers based on silicic acids and nature silicates are considered. The ratio of M and Q monomers and the production method determine the structure of MQ copolymers and, accordingly, their physicochemical characteristics. It is shown that the most successful synthetic approach is a polycondensation of organoalkoxysilanes in the medium of anhydrous acetic acid, which reduces the differences in reactivity of M and Q monomers and leads to obtaining a product with uniform composition in all fractions, with full absence of residual alkoxy-groups. The current concept of MQ copolymers is that of organo-inorganic hybrid systems with nanosized crosslinked inorganic regions limited by triorganosilyl groups and containing residual hydroxyl groups. The systems can be considered as a peculiar molecular composites consisting of separate parts that play the role of a polymer matrix, a plasticizer, and a nanosized filler. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in Silicon and Organosilicon Chemistry)
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