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Special Issue "Cascade Catalysis"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Organic Synthesis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bartolo Gabriele

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technologies, Via Pietro Bucci, 12/C, University of Calabria, 87036 - Arcavacata di Rende (CS), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: new syntheses of high value added molecules through catalytic assembly of simple units; innovative syntheses of heterocyclic molecules of pharmaceutical, agrochemical, or applicative interest; carbonylation chemistry; use of non-conventional solvents in organic synthesis; synthesis and semi-synthesis of bioactive compounds of pharmaceutical or agrochemical interest; synthesis of new materials for advanced applications; extraction, characterization, and evaluation of the biological activity of bioactive principles from natural matrices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Cascade”, “tandem”, or “sequential” catalysis refers to domino processes that correspond to the concatenation between different catalytic cycles, in which the product of the first cycle becomes the substrate of the second catalytic cycle and so on. These processes represent a particular case of "cascade", "tandem", "domino", or "sequential" reactions, which are processes in which two or more chemical transformations take place under identical conditions, with the product obtained in the first transformation becoming the substrate of the subsequent transformation(s), eventually leading to the final product.

Although rather frequent in biological systems (where a substrate is subsequently transformed into the final metabolite through a sequence of biocatalytic steps promoted by different enzymes), tandem catalysis is still relatively rare in chemical systems. However, during recent years, it has acquired an increasing importance in organic synthesis. In fact, cascade catalytic processes combine the intrinsic advantages of a sequential transformation (the possibility to construct functionalized molecules in one step starting from simple and readily available building blocks, avoiding the isolation and purification of the intermediate(s) with evident practical advantages, in terms of efficiency, selectivity, as well as atom, step and energy economy) with those associated with a catalytic process (the possibility to perform an otherwise kinetically hindered reaction, under mild conditions and using only a small amount of a promoter species).

This Special Issue is devoted to recent developments in this very important and emerging area of research. The scope is broad, and includes the elaboration of novel catalysts for performing already known processes in a more efficient manner, as well as the development of new cascade catalytic methods for the synthesis of products of industrial interest and of fine chemicals, including bioactive compounds.

Prof. Dr. Bartolo Gabriele
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cascade catalysis
  • homogeneous catalysis
  • cascade reactions
  • organic synthesis

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication Pd@[nBu4][Br] as a Simple Catalytic System for N-Alkylation Reactions with Alcohols
Molecules 2016, 21(8), 1042; doi:10.3390/molecules21081042
Received: 1 July 2016 / Revised: 28 July 2016 / Accepted: 29 July 2016 / Published: 10 August 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5046 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Palladium nanoparticles, simply and briefly generated in commercial and cheap onium salts using supercritical carbon dioxide, have been found to be an effective catalytic system for additive free N-alkylation reaction using alcohols via cascade oxidation/condensation/reduction steps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cascade Catalysis)
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Open AccessArticle Auto-Tandem Catalysis in Ionic Liquids: Synthesis of 2-Oxazolidinones by Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Carbonylation of Propargylic Amines in EmimEtSO4
Molecules 2016, 21(7), 897; doi:10.3390/molecules21070897
Received: 16 June 2016 / Revised: 1 July 2016 / Accepted: 5 July 2016 / Published: 8 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3762 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A convenient carbonylative approach to 2-oxazolidinone derivatives carried out using an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate, EmimEtSO4) as the solvent is presented. It is based on the sequential concatenation of two catalytic cycles, both catalyzed by the same metal species (auto-tandem
[...] Read more.
A convenient carbonylative approach to 2-oxazolidinone derivatives carried out using an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate, EmimEtSO4) as the solvent is presented. It is based on the sequential concatenation of two catalytic cycles, both catalyzed by the same metal species (auto-tandem catalysis): the first cycle corresponds to the oxidative monoaminocarbonylation of the triple bond of propargylic amines to give the corresponding 2-ynamide intermediates, while the second one involves the cyclocarbonylation of the latter to yield 2-(2-oxooxazolidin-5-ylidene)-acetamides. Reactions are carried out using a simple catalytic system consisting of PdI2 in conjunction with an excess of KI, and the catalyst/solvent system could be recycled several times without appreciable loss of activity after extraction of the organic product with Et2O. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cascade Catalysis)
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Open AccessCommunication A One-Pot Tandem Strategy in Catalytic Asymmetric Vinylogous Aldol Reaction of Homoallylic Alcohols
Molecules 2016, 21(7), 842; doi:10.3390/molecules21070842
Received: 14 May 2016 / Revised: 21 June 2016 / Accepted: 22 June 2016 / Published: 27 June 2016
PDF Full-text (1017 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Reported is a rationally-designed one-pot sequential strategy that allows homoallylic alcohols to be employed in a catalytic, asymmetric, direct vinylogous aldol reaction with a series of activated acyclic ketones, including trifluoromethyl ketones, γ-ketoesters, and α-keto phosphonates, in high yields (up to 95%) with
[...] Read more.
Reported is a rationally-designed one-pot sequential strategy that allows homoallylic alcohols to be employed in a catalytic, asymmetric, direct vinylogous aldol reaction with a series of activated acyclic ketones, including trifluoromethyl ketones, γ-ketoesters, and α-keto phosphonates, in high yields (up to 95%) with excellent regio- and enantio-selectivity (up to 99% ee). This modular combination, including Jones oxidation and asymmetric organocatalysis, has satisfactory compatibility and reliability even at a 20 mmol scale, albeit without intermediary purification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cascade Catalysis)

Review

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Open AccessReview A Novel Strategy for Biomass Upgrade: Cascade Approach to the Synthesis of Useful Compounds via C-C Bond Formation Using Biomass-Derived Sugars as Carbon Nucleophiles
Molecules 2016, 21(7), 937; doi:10.3390/molecules21070937
Received: 27 May 2016 / Revised: 12 July 2016 / Accepted: 18 July 2016 / Published: 20 July 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (5183 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Due to the depletion of fossil fuels, biomass-derived sugars have attracted increasing attention in recent years as an alternative carbon source. Although significant advances have been reported in the development of catalysts for the conversion of carbohydrates into key chemicals (e.g., degradation approaches
[...] Read more.
Due to the depletion of fossil fuels, biomass-derived sugars have attracted increasing attention in recent years as an alternative carbon source. Although significant advances have been reported in the development of catalysts for the conversion of carbohydrates into key chemicals (e.g., degradation approaches based on the dehydration of hydroxyl groups or cleavage of C-C bonds via retro-aldol reactions), only a limited range of products can be obtained through such processes. Thus, the development of a novel and efficient strategy targeted towards the preparation of a range of compounds from biomass-derived sugars is required. We herein describe the highly-selective cascade syntheses of a range of useful compounds using biomass-derived sugars as carbon nucleophiles. We focus on the upgrade of C2 and C3 oxygenates generated from glucose to yield useful compounds via C-C bond formation. The establishment of this novel synthetic methodology to generate valuable chemical products from monosaccharides and their decomposed oxygenated materials renders carbohydrates a potential alternative carbon resource to fossil fuels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cascade Catalysis)
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