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Special Issue "Glass Micromachining and Applications of Glass"

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A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marko T. Blom

Micronit Microfluidics BV, Colosseum 15, 7521 PV Enschede, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31 53 850 6 850
Fax: +31 53 850 6 851
Interests: lab-on-a-chip; microfluidics; MEMS; bioMEMS; glass micromachining

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although glass machining techniques have been around for some time, micromachining of glass is relatively new. Adoption of technologies from the silicon MEMS field such as wet chemical etching and micro powderblasting has led to glass-specific, wafer-scale and thereby cost-effective manufacturing processes. This combination of cost-effective and high accuracy machining in turn has led to a whole range of new application areas for glass devices, such as glass lab-on-a-chip, high optical quality flowcells, microreactors and hermetic packaging of sensors.

Obviously, the development of machining techniques has been and still is progressing further, for instance enabling high aspect ratio laser machining of structure types that would otherwise be impossible. For this reason we invite submission of papers, both on glass micromachining techniques in the broadest sense and on applications of glass microfabrication. This latter could include, but is not limited to: lab-on-a-chip, flowcells, microreactors, microchip capillary electrophoresis, wafer-scale packaging and glass MEMS.

Dr. Marko T. Blom
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • glass micromachining and microfabrication
  • lab-on-a-chip
  • flowcells
  • glass MEMS
  • capillary electrophoresis
  • microreactors
  • laser structuring of glass
  • (hermetic) wafer-scale packaging

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Freeform Fabrication of Magnetophotonic Crystals with Diamond Lattices of Oxide and Metallic Glasses for Terahertz Wave Control by Micro Patterning Stereolithography and Low Temperature Sintering
Micromachines 2013, 4(2), 149-156; doi:10.3390/mi4020149
Received: 25 January 2013 / Revised: 26 March 2013 / Accepted: 26 March 2013 / Published: 2 April 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1395 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Micrometer order magnetophotonic crystals with periodic arranged metallic glass and oxide glass composite materials were fabricated by stereolithographic method to reflect electromagnetic waves in terahertz frequency ranges through Bragg diffraction. In the fabrication process, the photo sensitive acrylic resin paste mixed with micrometer
[...] Read more.
Micrometer order magnetophotonic crystals with periodic arranged metallic glass and oxide glass composite materials were fabricated by stereolithographic method to reflect electromagnetic waves in terahertz frequency ranges through Bragg diffraction. In the fabrication process, the photo sensitive acrylic resin paste mixed with micrometer sized metallic glass of Fe72B14.4Si9.6Nb4 and oxide glass of B2O3·Bi2O3 particles was spread on a metal substrate, and cross sectional images of ultra violet ray were exposed. Through the layer by layer stacking, micro lattice structures with a diamond type periodic arrangement were successfully formed. The composite structures could be obtained through the dewaxing and sintering process with the lower temperature under the transition point of metallic glass. Transmission spectra of the terahertz waves through the magnetophotonic crystals were measured by using a terahertz time domain spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glass Micromachining and Applications of Glass)
Open AccessArticle Photomechanical Bending of Azobenzene-Based Photochromic Molecular Fibers
Micromachines 2013, 4(2), 128-137; doi:10.3390/mi4020128
Received: 31 December 2012 / Revised: 28 January 2013 / Accepted: 1 March 2013 / Published: 27 March 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Microfibers composed of azobenzene-based photochromic amorphous molecular materials, namely low molecular-mass photochromic materials with a glass-forming property, could be fabricated. These fibers were found to exhibit mechanical bending motion upon irradiation with a laser beam. In addition, the bending direction could be controlled
[...] Read more.
Microfibers composed of azobenzene-based photochromic amorphous molecular materials, namely low molecular-mass photochromic materials with a glass-forming property, could be fabricated. These fibers were found to exhibit mechanical bending motion upon irradiation with a laser beam. In addition, the bending direction could be controlled by altering the polarization direction of the irradiated light without changing the position of the light source or the wavelength of the light. In-situ fluorescence observation of mass transport induced at the surface of the fiber doped with CdSe quantum dots suggested that the bending motions were related with the photoinduced mass transport taking place near the irradiated surface of the fiber. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glass Micromachining and Applications of Glass)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Micromachining Processes on Electro-Osmotic Flow Mobility of Glass Surfaces
Micromachines 2013, 4(1), 67-79; doi:10.3390/mi4010067
Received: 4 January 2013 / Revised: 16 February 2013 / Accepted: 20 February 2013 / Published: 13 March 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (497 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Silica glass is frequently used as a device material for micro/nano fluidic devices due to its excellent properties, such as transparency and chemical resistance. Wet etching by hydrofluoric acid and dry etching by neutral loop discharge (NLD) plasma etching are currently used to
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Silica glass is frequently used as a device material for micro/nano fluidic devices due to its excellent properties, such as transparency and chemical resistance. Wet etching by hydrofluoric acid and dry etching by neutral loop discharge (NLD) plasma etching are currently used to micromachine glass to form micro/nano fluidic channels. Electro-osmotic flow (EOF) is one of the most effective methods to drive liquids into the channels. EOF mobility is affected by a property of the micromachined glass surfaces, which includes surface roughness that is determined by the manufacturing processes. In this paper, we investigate the effect of micromaching processes on the glass surface topography and the EOF mobility. We prepared glass surfaces by either wet etching or by NLD plasma etching, investigated the surface topography using atomic force microscopy, and attempted to correlate it with EOF generated in the micro-channels of the machined glass. Experiments revealed that the EOF mobility strongly depends on the surface roughness, and therefore upon the fabrication process used. A particularly strong dependency was observed when the surface roughness was on the order of the electric double layer thickness or below. We believe that the correlation described in this paper can be of great help in the design of micro/nano fluidic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glass Micromachining and Applications of Glass)
Open AccessArticle Micromanufacturing in Fused Silica via Femtosecond Laser Irradiation Followed by Gas-Phase Chemical Etching
Micromachines 2012, 3(4), 604-614; doi:10.3390/mi3040604
Received: 6 August 2012 / Revised: 28 August 2012 / Accepted: 17 September 2012 / Published: 28 September 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (616 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching (FLICE) with hydrogen fluoride (HF) is an emerging technique for the fabrication of directly buried, three-dimensional microfluidic channels in silica. The procedure, as described in literature, consists of irradiating a silica slab followed by chemical etching
[...] Read more.
Femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching (FLICE) with hydrogen fluoride (HF) is an emerging technique for the fabrication of directly buried, three-dimensional microfluidic channels in silica. The procedure, as described in literature, consists of irradiating a silica slab followed by chemical etching using hydrogen fluoride. With aqueous HF the etching process is diffusion-limited and is self-terminating, leading to maximum microchannel lengths of about 1.5 mm, while the use of low-pressure gaseous HF etchant can quickly produce 3 mm long channels with an aspect ratio (Length/Diameter) higher than 25. By utilizing this methodology the aspect ratio is not constant, but depends on the length of the channel. When the microchannel is short the aspect ratio increases quickly until it reaches a maximum length at around 1400 µm. Thereafter the aspect ratio starts to decrease slowly. In this paper we present a variation of the low-pressure gaseous HF etching method, which is based on the dynamic displacement of the etchant. This method results in a 13% increase in the aspect ratio (L/D = 29) at the expense of a low etching speed (4 µm/min). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glass Micromachining and Applications of Glass)
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