Special Issue "Laser Welding"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. João Pedro Oliveira

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 1248 Arthur E. Adams Drive, Columbus, OH 43221, USA
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Zhi Zeng

School of Mechatronics Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, No.2006, Xiyuan Ave, West Hi-Tech Zone, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: laser welding; shape memory alloys; numerical modeling; stress and distortion; fatigue

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Laser welding is a high-energy process used in a wide range of advanced materials to obtain micro to macro sized joints in both similar and dissimilar combinations. Moreover, this technique is widely used in several industries such as automotive, aerospace, and medical industries as well as electrical devices. Although laser welding has been used for several decades now, significant and exciting innovations often arise from both the process and/or material’s side.

This Special Issue of Metals is dedicated to Laser Welding and aims to present new and recent developments related to this topic. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: effects of laser welding on the material’s microstructure and performance; development of laser welding procedures for new advanced materials; modelling and simulation of laser/material interaction, thermal effects, stresses and distortion; hybrid laser welding. Papers which combine both experimental and theoretical approaches are specially welcomed.

Dr. João Pedro Oliveira
Prof. Dr. Zhi Zeng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Laser welding
  • Dissimilar joints
  • Microjoining
  • Structural characterization
  • Advanced materials
  • Microstructure
  • Mechanical behavior
  • Modelling and simulation
  • Laser welding robots

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle FEM Simulation of Dissimilar Aluminum Titanium Fiber Laser Welding Using 2D and 3D Gaussian Heat Sources
Metals 2017, 7(8), 307; doi:10.3390/met7080307
Received: 1 June 2017 / Revised: 2 August 2017 / Accepted: 8 August 2017 / Published: 10 August 2017
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Abstract
For a dissimilar laser weld, the model of the heat source is a paramount boundary condition for the prediction of the thermal phenomena, which occur during the welding cycle. In this paper, both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Gaussian heat sources were studied
[...] Read more.
For a dissimilar laser weld, the model of the heat source is a paramount boundary condition for the prediction of the thermal phenomena, which occur during the welding cycle. In this paper, both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Gaussian heat sources were studied for the thermal analysis of the fiber laser welding of titanium and aluminum dissimilar butt joint. The models were calibrated comparing the fusion zone of the experiment with that of the numerical model. The actual temperature during the welding cycle was registered by a thermocouple and used for validation of the numerical model. When it came to calculate the fusion zone dimensions in the transversal section, the 2D heat source showed more accurate results. The 3D heat source provided better results for the simulated weld pool and cooling rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Welding)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding Parameters on Penetration and Microstructure Characterization of a DP1000 Steel Butt Joint
Metals 2017, 7(8), 292; doi:10.3390/met7080292
Received: 13 June 2017 / Revised: 23 July 2017 / Accepted: 27 July 2017 / Published: 1 August 2017
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Abstract
Of particular importance and interest are the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding parameters on penetration and microstructure characterization of DP1000 butt joint, which is widely used in the automotive industry nowadays. Some key experimental technologies including pre-welding sample preparation and optimization
[...] Read more.
Of particular importance and interest are the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding parameters on penetration and microstructure characterization of DP1000 butt joint, which is widely used in the automotive industry nowadays. Some key experimental technologies including pre-welding sample preparation and optimization design of sample fixture for a sufficient shielding gas flow are performed to ensure consistent and stable testing. The weld quality can be influenced by several process factors, such as laser beam power, pulse duration, overlap, spot diameter, pulse type, and welding velocity. The results indicate that these key process parameters have a significant effect on the weld penetration. Meanwhile, the fusion zone of butt joints exhibits obviously greater hardness than the base metal and heat affected zone of butt joints. Additionally, the volume fraction of martensite of dual-phase steel plays a considerable effect on the hardness and the change of microstructure characterization of the weld joint. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Welding)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Effects of Laser Offset and Hybrid Welding on Microstructure and IMC in Fe–Al Dissimilar Welding
Metals 2017, 7(8), 282; doi:10.3390/met7080282
Received: 27 June 2017 / Revised: 14 July 2017 / Accepted: 20 July 2017 / Published: 25 July 2017
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Abstract
Welding between Fe and Al alloys is difficult because of a significant difference in thermal properties and poor mutual solid-state solubility. This affects the weld microstructure and causes the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The present study aims to explore the weld
[...] Read more.
Welding between Fe and Al alloys is difficult because of a significant difference in thermal properties and poor mutual solid-state solubility. This affects the weld microstructure and causes the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The present study aims to explore the weld microstructure and those compounds over two different technologies: the laser offset welding and the hybrid laser-MIG (Metal inert gas) welding. The former consists of focusing the laser beam on the top surface of one of the two plates at a certain distance (offset) from the interfaces. Such a method minimizes the interaction between elevated temperature liquid phases. The latter combines the laser with a MIG/MAG arc, which helps in bridging the gap and stabilizing the weld pool. AISI 316 stainless steel and AA5754 aluminum alloy were welded together in butt configuration. The microstructure was characterized and the microhardness was measured. The energy dispersive spectroscopy/X-ray Diffraction (EDS/XRD) analysis revealed the composition of the intermetallic compounds. Laser offset welding significantly reduced the content of cracks and promoted a narrower intermetallic layer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Welding)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ti5553 Butt Welds Performed by LBW under Conduction Regime
Metals 2017, 7(7), 269; doi:10.3390/met7070269
Received: 20 June 2017 / Revised: 7 July 2017 / Accepted: 10 July 2017 / Published: 13 July 2017
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Abstract
Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti5553) is a metastable β titanium alloy with a high potential use in the aeronautic industry due to its high strength, excellent hardenability, fracture toughness and high fatigue resistance. However, recent research shows this alloy has a limited weldability. Different welding technologies
[...] Read more.
Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti5553) is a metastable β titanium alloy with a high potential use in the aeronautic industry due to its high strength, excellent hardenability, fracture toughness and high fatigue resistance. However, recent research shows this alloy has a limited weldability. Different welding technologies have been applied in the literature to weld this alloy, such as electron beam welding (EBW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or laser beam welding (LBW) under keyhole regime. Thus, in tensile tests, joints normally break at the weld zones, the strength of the welds being always lower than that of the base metal. In the present work, a novel approach, based on the application of LBW under conduction regime (with a High-Power Diode Laser, HPDL), has been employed for the first time to weld this alloy. Microstructure, microhardness and strength of obtained welds were analyzed and reported in this paper. LBW under conduction regime (LBW-CR) leads to welds with slightly higher values of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) than those previously obtained with other joining processes, probably due to the higher hardness of the fusion zone and to lower porosity of the weld. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Welding)
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Open AccessArticle The Influence of Laser Welding on the Mechanical Properties of Dual Phase and Trip Steels
Metals 2017, 7(7), 239; doi:10.3390/met7070239
Received: 6 June 2017 / Revised: 23 June 2017 / Accepted: 26 June 2017 / Published: 29 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (9329 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nowadays, a wide range of materials is used for car body structures in order to improve both the passengers’ safety and fuel consumption. These are joined by laser welding and solid state fiber lasers being used more and more in present. The article
[...] Read more.
Nowadays, a wide range of materials is used for car body structures in order to improve both the passengers’ safety and fuel consumption. These are joined by laser welding and solid state fiber lasers being used more and more in present. The article is focused on the research of laser welding influence on the mechanical and deformation properties, microstructure and microhardness of advanced high-strength steels: high-strength low-alloyed steel HC340LA, dual phase steel HCT600X and multi-phase residual austenite steel RAK40/70. The proper welding parameters have been found based on weld quality evaluation. The specimens for tensile test with longitudinal laser weld were used to measure mechanical and deformation properties. Microstructure and microhardness of laser welds were evaluated in the base metal, heat affected zone and fusion zone. The higher values of strength and lower ones for deformation properties of laser-welded materials have been found for dual and multi-phase steel. The microhardness strongly depends on the carbon equivalent of steel. Deformation properties are more sensitive than strength properties to the change of microstructure in the fusion zone and heat affected zone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Welding)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Multiphysics Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Aluminum Wettability on a Titanium Substrate for Laser Welding-Brazing Process
Metals 2017, 7(6), 218; doi:10.3390/met7060218
Received: 5 May 2017 / Revised: 5 June 2017 / Accepted: 9 June 2017 / Published: 13 June 2017
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Abstract
The control of metal wettability is a key-factor in the field of brazing or welding-brazing. The present paper deals with the numerical simulation of the whole phenomena occurring during the assembly of dissimilar alloys. The study is realized in the frame of potential
[...] Read more.
The control of metal wettability is a key-factor in the field of brazing or welding-brazing. The present paper deals with the numerical simulation of the whole phenomena occurring during the assembly of dissimilar alloys. The study is realized in the frame of potential applications for the aircraft industry, considering the case of the welding-brazing of aluminum Al5754 and quasi-pure titanium Ti40. The assembly configuration, presented here, is a simplification of the real experiment. We have reduced the three-dimensional overlap configuration to a bi-dimensional case. In the present case, an aluminum cylinder is fused onto a titanium substrate. The main physical phenomena which are considered here are: the heat transfers, the fluid flows with free boundaries and the mass transfer in terms of chemical species diffusion. The numerical problem is implemented with the commercial software Comsol Multiphysics™, by coupling heat equation, Navier-Stokes and continuity equations and the free boundary motion. The latter is treated with the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method, with a particular focus on the contact angle implementation. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a very satisfactory agreement in terms of droplet shape, thermal field and intermetallic layer thickness. The model validates our numerical approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Welding)
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Open AccessArticle Laser Beam Welding of a Ti–6Al–4V Support Flange for Buy-to-Fly Reduction
Metals 2017, 7(5), 183; doi:10.3390/met7050183
Received: 12 April 2017 / Revised: 5 May 2017 / Accepted: 16 May 2017 / Published: 20 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7366 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Titanium and its alloys are increasingly being used in aerospace, although a number of issues must be addressed. Namely, in the framework of welding to produce complex parts, the same mechanical strength and a reduced buy-to-fly ratio are desired in comparison with the
[...] Read more.
Titanium and its alloys are increasingly being used in aerospace, although a number of issues must be addressed. Namely, in the framework of welding to produce complex parts, the same mechanical strength and a reduced buy-to-fly ratio are desired in comparison with the same components resulting from machining. To give grounds to actual application of autogenous laser beam welding, Ti–6Al–4V L- and T-joints have been investigated in this paper, as they are a common occurrence in general complex components. Discussions in terms of possible imperfections, microstructure, and microhardness have been conducted. Then, a real part consisting of a support flange for aerospace application has been chosen as a valuable test-article to be compared with its machined counterpart both in terms of strength and buy-to-fly. The feasibility and the effectiveness of the process are shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Welding)
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