Special Issue "Metals Machining – Recent Advances in Experimental and Modeling of the Cutting Process"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ing. Badis HADDAG

Institut Mines-Telecom (IMT) – Lorraine University Laboratory for the study of Microstructures and Mechanics of Materials, LEM3 -UMR CNRS 7239 InSIC, 27 Rue d'Hellieule, 88100 Saint-Dié-des-Vosges - France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Materials forming; Machining processes, Modeling/experimental aspects; Material behavior; Tribological behavior; Tool Wear; Surface integrity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metals machining involves severe loading at the cutting zone. Work-material behavior, cutting tool characteristics, cutting conditions and configuration, all have effects on cutting process performance, machined part quality, and cutting cost. In the last few years, several research works have been conducted to understand the physical phenomena occurring when machining metal-based materials. However, a great deal remains to be studied, because new high-performance metals are being developed and their machinability is not well controlled (excessive wear, built-up edge formation, surface integrity degradation, chip fragmentation difficulty, etc.). For instance, mechanisms of microstructure evolution when machining metals having a complex microstructure are not clearly explained (e.g., is there recrystallization or not?). Thus, the study of cutting phenomena in metals machining remains open.

This Special Issue invites the submission of high quality research articles related to the machining of metal-based materials. It covers a large topic and may include these main aspects:

  • Metal machinability (e.g., cutting power, hardness, ductility, chemical reaction, etc.)
  • Work-material behavior (e.g., work-hardening, ductility, heat generation, etc.)
  • Tribological behavior, e.g., related to cutting conditions (dry or wet)
  • Microstructure evolution (e.g., recrystallization, grain size, etc.)
  • Chip formation mechanisms (e.g., segmentation, fragmentation, etc.)
  • Surface integrity, e.g., related to the surface roughness and induced residual stresses, etc.
  • Tools wear, related to the machined metal and tool characteristics
  • Tools design based on work-material characteristics (e.g., chip breaker, edge preparation)

High quality research works on metals machining, related to experiments (e.g., instrumented cutting tests), characterization (e.g., hardness, fracture, microstructure), and modeling (e.g., analytical, numerical) are expected.

Assoc. Prof. Badis HADDAG
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Machining processes
  • Metals machining
  • Metals machinability
  • Work-material behavior
  • Tribological behavior
  • Microstructure evolution
  • Chip formation mechanisms
  • Surface integrity
  • Tools wear
  • Experiment/Characterization/Modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle CO2 Laser Cutting of Hot Stamping Boron Steel Sheets
Metals 2017, 7(11), 456; doi:10.3390/met7110456
Received: 2 October 2017 / Revised: 19 October 2017 / Accepted: 23 October 2017 / Published: 27 October 2017
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Abstract
This study investigates the quality of CO2 laser cutting of hot stamping boron steel sheets that are employed in the fabrication of automotive body-in-white. For this purpose, experimental laser cutting tests were conducted on 1.2 mm sheets at varying levels of laser
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This study investigates the quality of CO2 laser cutting of hot stamping boron steel sheets that are employed in the fabrication of automotive body-in-white. For this purpose, experimental laser cutting tests were conducted on 1.2 mm sheets at varying levels of laser power, cutting speed, and oxygen pressure. The resulting quality of cut edges was evaluated in terms of perpendicularity tolerance, surface irregularity, kerf width, heat affected zone, and dross extension. Experimental tests were based on a L9(34) orthogonal array design, with the effects of the process parameters on the quality responses being determined by means of a statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA). Quadratic mathematical models were developed to determine the relationships between the cutting parameters and the quality responses. Finally, a routine based on an optimization criterion was employed to predict the optimal setting of cutting factors and its effect on the quality responses. A confirmation experiment was conducted to verify the appropriateness of the optimization routine. The results show that all of the examined process parameters have a key role in determining the cut quality of hot stamping boron steel sheets, with cutting speed and their interactions having the most influencing effects. Particularly, interactions can have an opposite behavior for different levels of the process parameters. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Increasing Feed Rate on Tool Deterioration and Cutting Force during End Milling of 718Plus Superalloy Using Cemented Tungsten Carbide Tool
Metals 2017, 7(10), 441; doi:10.3390/met7100441
Received: 30 September 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 17 October 2017 / Published: 19 October 2017
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Abstract
Understanding how feed rate (ft) affects tool deterioration during milling of Ni-based superalloys is practically important, but this understanding is currently insufficient. In the present study using a 718Plus Ni-based alloy and cemented tungsten carbide tool inserts, milling experiments were
[...] Read more.
Understanding how feed rate (ft) affects tool deterioration during milling of Ni-based superalloys is practically important, but this understanding is currently insufficient. In the present study using a 718Plus Ni-based alloy and cemented tungsten carbide tool inserts, milling experiments were conducted with ft = 0.10 mm/tooth under either dry or wet (with coolant) conditions. The results are compared to those based on using ft = 0.05 mm/tooth from previous studies. The milling force (F) was monitored, the cutting tool edge was examined and the flank wear (VBmax) was measured. As would be expected, an increase in ft increased F. It was found that F correlated well with VBmax for the high ft (0.1 mm/tooth) experiments, as opposed to the previously observed poor F-VBmax relationship for the lower ft (0.05 mm/tooth) value. This is explained, supported by detailed failure analysis of the cutting tool edges, by the deterioration mode to be dominantly edge chipping with a low occurrence of fracturing along the flank face when the high ft was used. This dominancy of the deterioration mode means that the tool edge and workpiece contact was consistent and thus resulted in a clear F-VBmax relationship. A clear F-VBmax relationship should then mean monitoring VBmax through monitoring F is possible. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Tool Path Strategy and Cooling Condition Effects on the Cutting Force and Surface Quality in Micromilling Operations
Metals 2017, 7(10), 426; doi:10.3390/met7100426
Received: 22 August 2017 / Revised: 15 September 2017 / Accepted: 9 October 2017 / Published: 13 October 2017
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Abstract
Compared to milling on a macro scale, the micromilling process has several cumbersome points that need to be addressed. Rapid tool wear and fracture, severe burr formation, and poor surface quality are the major problems encountered in the micromilling process. This study aimed
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Compared to milling on a macro scale, the micromilling process has several cumbersome points that need to be addressed. Rapid tool wear and fracture, severe burr formation, and poor surface quality are the major problems encountered in the micromilling process. This study aimed to reveal the effect of cutting path strategies on the cutting force and surface quality in the micromilling of a pocket. The hatch zigzag tool path strategy and the contour climb tool path strategy under different cooling conditions (e.g., dry, air blow, and flood coolant) at fixed cutting parameters. The micromilling tests revealed that better results were obtained with the use of the contour tool path strategy in terms of cutting forces (by up to ~43% compared to the dry condition) and surface quality (by up to ~44% compared to the air blow condition) when compared to the hatch tool path strategy. In addition, the flood coolant reduces the cutting temperature and eliminates chips to significantly enhance the quality of the micro milled surface. Full article
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