Special Issue "Metabolomic Studies of the Human Gut Microbiome"

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A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Wendy Roslyn Russell

Research Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Greenburn Road, Bucksburn, Aberdeen, AB21 9SB, UK
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite tremendous advances in characterizing the microbial diversity within the gastrointestinal tract, very little is known about the function and role of even the most dominant bacterial species within the human host. It is becoming widely accepted that the metabolic products formed by gut bacteria directly impact on human health and disease, particularly regarding immune response and inflammation. Emerging evidence suggests that these metabolites play an important role in the development of many diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. In most cases, the products of metabolism are uncharacterized and their mechanism of action unknown. This Special Issue of Metabolites “Metabolomic Studies of the Human Gut Microbiome” will be dedicated to areas of research, which use metabolomic methodologies to establish the link between microbial diversity and metabolic functionality. The topics that will be covered by this Special Issue will be those that address identifying microbial metabolites, particularly at their in vivo concentrations, establishing their mechanism of formation and the bacterial species responsible. Metabolites produced by both commensal and pathogenic gut bacteria will be of interest, as will the gut-derived systemic metabolites. There will be a focus on aspects that influence the microbial metabotype, including; genetic factors, diet, BMI, physical activity, non-dietary xenobiotics (e.g. drugs, pollutants), oxidative stress, aging and disease.

Dr. Wendy Roslyn Russell
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • microbial communities
  • quantitative metabolomics
  • microbial-derived gut metabolites
  • microbial-derived systemic metabolites
  • metabolic modelling
  • LC-MS, GC-MS and NMR
  • multivariate analysis; data integration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Towards the Fecal Metabolome Derived from Moderate Red Wine Intake
Metabolites 2014, 4(4), 1101-1118; doi:10.3390/metabo4041101
Received: 31 July 2014 / Revised: 28 November 2014 / Accepted: 15 December 2014 / Published: 19 December 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (624 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dietary polyphenols, including red wine phenolic compounds, are extensively metabolized during their passage through the gastrointestinal tract; and their biological effects at the gut level (i.e., anti-inflammatory activity, microbiota modulation, interaction with cells, among others) seem to be due more to
[...] Read more.
Dietary polyphenols, including red wine phenolic compounds, are extensively metabolized during their passage through the gastrointestinal tract; and their biological effects at the gut level (i.e., anti-inflammatory activity, microbiota modulation, interaction with cells, among others) seem to be due more to their microbial-derived metabolites rather than to the original forms found in food. In an effort to improve our understanding of the biological effects that phenolic compounds exert at the gut level, this paper summarizes the changes observed in the human fecal metabolome after an intervention study consisting of a daily consumption of 250 mL of wine during four weeks by healthy volunteers (n = 33). It assembles data from two analytical approaches: (1) UPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of phenolic metabolites in fecal solutions (targeted analysis); and (2) UHPLC-TOF MS analysis of the fecal solutions (non-targeted analysis). Both approaches revealed statistically-significant changes in the concentration of several metabolites as a consequence of the wine intake. Similarity and complementarity between targeted and non-targeted approaches in the analysis of the fecal metabolome are discussed. Both strategies allowed the definition of a complex metabolic profile derived from wine intake. Likewise, the identification of endogenous markers could lead to new hypotheses to unravel the relationship between moderate wine consumption and the metabolic functionality of gut microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomic Studies of the Human Gut Microbiome)

Review

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Open AccessReview The Role of Colonic Bacteria in the Metabolism of the Natural Isoflavone Daidzin to Equol
Metabolites 2015, 5(1), 56-73; doi:10.3390/metabo5010056
Received: 7 November 2014 / Accepted: 7 January 2015 / Published: 14 January 2015
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (538 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Isoflavones are found in leguminous plants, especially soybeans. They have a structural similarity to natural estrogens, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors and elicit biological activities similar to natural estrogens. They have been suggested to be beneficial for the prevention and
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Isoflavones are found in leguminous plants, especially soybeans. They have a structural similarity to natural estrogens, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors and elicit biological activities similar to natural estrogens. They have been suggested to be beneficial for the prevention and therapy of hormone-dependent diseases. After soy products are consumed, the bacteria of the intestinal microflora metabolize isoflavones to metabolites with altered absorption, bioavailability, and estrogenic characteristics. Variations in the effect of soy products have been correlated with the isoflavone metabolites found in plasma and urine samples of the individuals consuming soy products. The beneficial effects of the soy isoflavone daidzin, the glycoside of daidzein, have been reported in individuals producing equol, a reduction product of daidzein produced by specific colonic bacteria in individuals called equol producers. These individuals comprise 30% and 60% of populations consuming Western and soy-rich Asian diets, respectively. Since the higher percentage of equol producers in populations consuming soy-rich diets is correlated with a lower incidence of hormone-dependent diseases, considerable efforts have been made to detect the specific colonic bacteria involved in the metabolism of daidzein to the more estrogenic compound, equol, which should facilitate the investigation of the metabolic activities related to this compound. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomic Studies of the Human Gut Microbiome)

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