Special Issue "Metabolomics and/or Biomarkers for Drug Discovery"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Pollen K.F. Yeung

Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism Laboratory, 5968 College Street, Burbidge Building, College of Pharmacy, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4R2, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 902 4941396
Interests: biomarkers; pharmacokinetics; metabolism; metabolites; HPLC; pharmacology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolomics is the study of biological systems using an integrated approach, which generates unique chemical fingerprints characterizing specific cellular processes. It focuses mainly on profiling small-molecule metabolites (metabolic profiling), and differs from genomics and proteomics which characterize the profiles of genes and proteins, respectively. On the other hand, biomarkers are objectively and quantitatively measurable indicators of biological or pathogenic processes, which can include small molecular entities, as well as large molecular weight proteins and genetic material. Both metabolomics and biomarkers are increasingly used in drug discovery and development, managing disease progression and personalized medicine. This Special Issue is devoted to the application of metabolomics and/or biomarkers in drug discovery and development. Topics covered by this Special Issue will include (not exclusively): Identification of metabolites and/or biomarkers as targets for drugs and natural health products, validation of targets derived from metabolomics and/or biomarkers, metabolites and/or biomarkers as therapeutics, metabolomics and/or biomarkers for drug development, disease modeling and management, and personalized medicine.

Prof. Dr. Pollen K. Yeung
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metabolomics
  • Pharmacometabolomics
  • Biomarkers
  • Drugs
  • Natural Health Products
  • Metabolites

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Review

Open AccessEditorial Metabolomics and Biomarkers for Drug Discovery
Metabolites 2018, 8(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo8010011
Received: 18 January 2018 / Revised: 26 January 2018 / Accepted: 26 January 2018 / Published: 31 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (156 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metabolomics and biomarkers are increasingly used in drug discovery and development, and are applied to personalized medicine. Progress in these research areas has increased our understanding of disease pathology and improved therapeutic strategies for many diseases with unmet challenges. Further advances will ultimately
[...] Read more.
Metabolomics and biomarkers are increasingly used in drug discovery and development, and are applied to personalized medicine. Progress in these research areas has increased our understanding of disease pathology and improved therapeutic strategies for many diseases with unmet challenges. Further advances will ultimately result in the development of better drugs and breakthrough therapies, which will benefit millions of patients suffering from chronic and life-threatening diseases worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and/or Biomarkers for Drug Discovery)

Review

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessReview Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate Metabolism in Red Blood Cells as a Potential Biomarker for Post-Exercise Hypotension and a Drug Target for Cardiovascular Protection
Metabolites 2018, 8(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo8020030
Received: 6 April 2018 / Revised: 27 April 2018 / Accepted: 29 April 2018 / Published: 2 May 2018
PDF Full-text (2626 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The importance of adenosine and ATP in regulating many biological functions has long been recognized, especially for their effects on the cardiovascular system, which may be used for management of hypertension and cardiometabolic diseases. In response to ischemia and cardiovascular injury, ATP is
[...] Read more.
The importance of adenosine and ATP in regulating many biological functions has long been recognized, especially for their effects on the cardiovascular system, which may be used for management of hypertension and cardiometabolic diseases. In response to ischemia and cardiovascular injury, ATP is broken down to release adenosine. The effect of adenosine is very short lived because it is rapidly taken up by erythrocytes (RBCs), myocardial and endothelial cells, and also rapidly catabolized to oxypurine metabolites. Intracellular adenosine is phosphorylated back to adenine nucleotides via a salvage pathway. Extracellular and intracellular ATP is broken down rapidly to ADP and AMP, and finally to adenosine by 5′-nucleotidase. These metabolic events are known to occur in the myocardium, endothelium as well as in RBCs. Exercise has been shown to increase metabolism of ATP in RBCs, which may be an important mechanism for post-exercise hypotension and cardiovascular protection. The post-exercise effect was greater in hypertensive than in normotensive rats. The review summarizes current evidence in support of ATP metabolism in the RBC as a potential surrogate biomarker for cardiovascular protection and toxicities. It also discusses the opportunities, challenges, and obstacles of exploiting ATP metabolism in RBCs as a target for drug development and precision medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and/or Biomarkers for Drug Discovery)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Monitoring for Response to Antineoplastic Drugs: The Potential of a Metabolomic Approach
Metabolites 2017, 7(4), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo7040060
Received: 28 August 2017 / Revised: 9 October 2017 / Accepted: 13 November 2017 / Published: 16 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
For most cancers, chemotherapeutic options are rapidly expanding, providing the oncologist with substantial choices. Therefore, there is a growing need to select the best systemic therapy, for any individual, that effectively halts tumor progression with minimal toxicity. Having the capability to predict benefit
[...] Read more.
For most cancers, chemotherapeutic options are rapidly expanding, providing the oncologist with substantial choices. Therefore, there is a growing need to select the best systemic therapy, for any individual, that effectively halts tumor progression with minimal toxicity. Having the capability to predict benefit and to anticipate toxicity would be ideal, but remains elusive at this time. An alternative approach is an adaptive approach that involves close observation for treatment response and emergence of resistance. Currently, response to systemic therapy is estimated using radiographic tests. Unfortunately, radiographic estimates of response are imperfect and radiographic signs of response can be delayed. This is particularly problematic for targeted agents, as tumor shrinkage is often not apparent with these drugs. As a result, patients are exposed to prolonged courses of toxic drugs that may ultimately be found to be ineffective. A biomarker-based adaptive strategy that involves the serial analysis of the metabolome is attractive. The metabolome changes rapidly with changes in physiology. Changes in the circulating metabolome associated with various antineoplastic agents have been described, but further work will be required to understand what changes signify clinical benefit. We present an investigative approach for the discovery and validation of metabolomic response biomarkers, which consists of serial analysis of the metabolome and linkage of changes in the metabolome to measurable therapeutic benefit. Potential pitfalls in the development of metabolomic biomarkers of response and loss of response are reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and/or Biomarkers for Drug Discovery)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Parameters of the Endocannabinoid System as Novel Biomarkers in Sepsis and Septic Shock
Metabolites 2017, 7(4), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo7040055
Received: 11 October 2017 / Revised: 26 October 2017 / Accepted: 30 October 2017 / Published: 1 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (605 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sepsis represents a dysregulated immune response to infection, with a continuum of severity progressing to septic shock. This dysregulated response generally follows a pattern by which an initial hyperinflammatory phase is followed by a state of sepsis-associated immunosuppression. Major challenges in improving sepsis
[...] Read more.
Sepsis represents a dysregulated immune response to infection, with a continuum of severity progressing to septic shock. This dysregulated response generally follows a pattern by which an initial hyperinflammatory phase is followed by a state of sepsis-associated immunosuppression. Major challenges in improving sepsis care include developing strategies to ensure early and accurate identification and diagnosis of the disease process, improving our ability to predict outcomes and stratify patients, and the need for novel sepsis-specific treatments such as immunomodulation. Biomarkers offer promise with all three of these challenges and are likely also to be the solution to determining a patient’s immune status; something that is critical in guiding effective and safe immunomodulatory therapy. Currently available biomarkers used in sepsis lack sensitivity and specificity, among other significant shortcomings. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an emerging topic of research with evidence suggesting a ubiquitous presence on both central and peripheral tissues, including an intrinsic link with immune function. This review will first discuss the state of sepsis biomarkers and lack of available treatments, followed by an introduction to the ECS and a discussion of its potential to provide novel biomarkers and treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and/or Biomarkers for Drug Discovery)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top