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Special Issue "Therapeutics Delivery Systems for Regenerative Nanomedicine"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Nadia Jessel

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Osteoarticular and Dental Regenerative Nanomedicine Laboratory, Faculté de Médecine, 11 rue Humann, Strasbourg, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: material science; nanomedicine; regenerative medicine; tissue engineering
Guest Editor
Dr. Pascale Schwinté

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Osteoarticular and Dental Regenerative Nanomedicine Laboratory, Faculté de Médecine, 11 rue Humann, Strasbourg, France
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

While the aim of tissue engineering (TE) is to produce biological substitutes of failing organs, regenerative medicine is dedicated to restoring tissue function, and uses several methods to achieve this goal (for instance, gene therapy or nanomedicine). The two fields are merging today, and constitute a strongly interdisciplinary domain called TERM (Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine).

Cell-based therapies are growing as strategies for tissue repair, but the important drawback remains the tuning of the microenvironments of these delivered cells. Some cell-based therapies for tissue repair have been used without cell carriers, but long term cell grafting has proven to be more efficacious in the presence of an appropriate biomaterial. The ideal biomaterial carrier should enable cell integration, differentiation, and proliferation within the wounded host tissue, regeneration into normal tissue through healing, and restore function. In this environment, many cues will trigger the physiological processes of tissue regeneration: receptors, growth factors, vascularization, and proteases. In addition, one can further enhance biomaterial scaffolds' functionalities by integrating other therapeutics, and there is growing interest in drug delivery applications in tissue engineering. This field is called TE therapeutics.

In this Special Issue, we address the various aspects involved in the improvement of tissue repair through the elaboration of therapeutics delivery systems.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Nadia Jessel
Dr. Pascale Schwinté
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • drug delivery systems
  • biomaterials
  • controlled release
  • sustained release
  • targeted delivery
  • nanocarriers
  • regenerative nanomedicine

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Active Nanofibrous Membrane Effects on Gingival Cell Inflammatory Response
Materials 2015, 8(10), 7217-7229; doi:10.3390/ma8105376
Received: 25 August 2015 / Revised: 8 October 2015 / Accepted: 20 October 2015 / Published: 27 October 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (10118 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is involved in normal skin wound healing and also has anti-inflammatory properties. The association of α-MSH to polyelectrolyte layers with various supports has been shown to improve these anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of nanofibrous
[...] Read more.
Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is involved in normal skin wound healing and also has anti-inflammatory properties. The association of α-MSH to polyelectrolyte layers with various supports has been shown to improve these anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of nanofibrous membrane functionalized with α-MSH linked to polyelectrolyte layers on gingival cell inflammatory response. Human oral epithelial cells (EC) and fibroblasts (FB) were cultured on plastic or electrospun Poly-#-caprolactone (PCL) membranes with α-MSH covalently coupled to Poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA-α-MSH), for 6 to 24 h. Cells were incubated with or without Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS). Cell proliferation and migration were determined using AlamarBlue test and scratch assay. Expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) was evaluated using RT-qPCR method. Cell cultures on plastic showed that PGA-α-MSH reduced EC and FB migration and decreased IL-6 and TGF-β expression in Pg-LPS stimulated EC. PGA-α-MSH functionalized PCL membranes reduced proliferation of Pg-LPS stimulated EC and FB. A significant decrease of IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β expression was also observed in Pg-LPS stimulated EC and FB. This study showed that the functionalization of nanofibrous PCL membranes efficiently amplified the anti-inflammatory effect of PGA-α-MSH on gingival cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutics Delivery Systems for Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Open AccessCommunication Integrating Microtissues in Nanofiber Scaffolds for Regenerative Nanomedicine
Materials 2015, 8(10), 6863-6867; doi:10.3390/ma8105342
Received: 26 August 2015 / Revised: 18 September 2015 / Accepted: 28 September 2015 / Published: 9 October 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (5359 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new generation of biomaterials focus on smart materials incorporating cells. Here, we describe a novel generation of synthetic nanofibrous implant functionalized with living microtissues for regenerative nanomedicine. The strategy designed here enhances the effectiveness of therapeutic implants compared to current approaches used
[...] Read more.
A new generation of biomaterials focus on smart materials incorporating cells. Here, we describe a novel generation of synthetic nanofibrous implant functionalized with living microtissues for regenerative nanomedicine. The strategy designed here enhances the effectiveness of therapeutic implants compared to current approaches used in the clinic today based on single cells added to the implant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutics Delivery Systems for Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Open AccessArticle Biocompatibility and Stability of Polysaccharide Polyelectrolyte Complexes Aimed at Respiratory Delivery
Materials 2015, 8(9), 5647-5670; doi:10.3390/ma8095268
Received: 1 July 2015 / Revised: 17 August 2015 / Accepted: 19 August 2015 / Published: 28 August 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (2073 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chitosan (CS) and chondroitin sulfate (CHS) are natural polymers with demonstrated applicability in drug delivery, while nanoparticles are one of the most explored carriers for transmucosal delivery of biopharmaceuticals. In this work we have prepared CS/CHS nanoparticles and associated for the first time
[...] Read more.
Chitosan (CS) and chondroitin sulfate (CHS) are natural polymers with demonstrated applicability in drug delivery, while nanoparticles are one of the most explored carriers for transmucosal delivery of biopharmaceuticals. In this work we have prepared CS/CHS nanoparticles and associated for the first time the therapeutic protein insulin. Fluorescein isothiocyanate bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) was also used to enable comparison of behaviors regarding differences in molecular weight (5.7 kDa versus 67 kDa). Nanoparticles of approximately 200 nm and positive zeta potential around +20 mV were obtained. These parameters remained stable for up to 1 month at 4 °C. Proteins were associated with efficiencies of more than 50%. The release of FITC-BSA in PBS pH 7.4 was more sustained (50% in 24 h) than that of insulin (85% in 24 h). The biocompatibility of nanoparticles was tested in Calu-3 and A549 cells by means of three different assays. The metabolic assay MTT, the determination of lactate dehydrogenase release, and the quantification of the inflammatory response generated by cell exposure to nanoparticles have indicated an absence of overt toxicity. Overall, the results suggest good indications on the application of CS/CHS nanoparticles in respiratory transmucosal protein delivery, but the set of assays should be widened to clarify obtained results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutics Delivery Systems for Regenerative Nanomedicine)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Active Nanomaterials to Meet the Challenge of Dental Pulp Regeneration
Materials 2015, 8(11), 7461-7471; doi:10.3390/ma8115387
Received: 28 August 2015 / Accepted: 19 October 2015 / Published: 5 November 2015
PDF Full-text (1529 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The vitality of the pulp is fundamental to the functional life of the tooth. For this aim, active and living biomaterials are required to avoid the current drastic treatment, which is the removal of all the cellular and molecular content regardless of its
[...] Read more.
The vitality of the pulp is fundamental to the functional life of the tooth. For this aim, active and living biomaterials are required to avoid the current drastic treatment, which is the removal of all the cellular and molecular content regardless of its regenerative potential. The regeneration of the pulp tissue is the dream of many generations of dental surgeons and will revolutionize clinical practices. Recently, the potential of the regenerative medicine field suggests that it would be possible to achieve such complex regeneration. Indeed, three crucial steps are needed: the control of infection and inflammation and the regeneration of lost pulp tissues. For regenerative medicine, in particular for dental pulp regeneration, the use of nano-structured biomaterials becomes decisive. Nano-designed materials allow the concentration of many different functions in a small volume, the increase in the quality of targeting, as well as the control of cost and delivery of active molecules. Nanomaterials based on extracellular mimetic nanostructure and functionalized with multi-active therapeutics appear essential to reverse infection and inflammation and concomitantly to orchestrate pulp cell colonization and differentiation. This novel generation of nanomaterials seems very promising to meet the challenge of the complex dental pulp regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutics Delivery Systems for Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Open AccessReview Smart Dressings Based on Nanostructured Fibers Containing Natural Origin Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regenerative Compounds
Materials 2015, 8(8), 5154-5193; doi:10.3390/ma8085154
Received: 4 July 2015 / Revised: 30 July 2015 / Accepted: 5 August 2015 / Published: 11 August 2015
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (2233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients’ quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds.
[...] Read more.
A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients’ quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds. In spite of all the efforts that have been made during the recent years towards the development of artificial wound dressings, none of the currently available options combine all the requirements necessary for quick and optimal cutaneous regeneration. Therefore, technological advances in the area of temporary and permanent smart dressings for wound care are required. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology can improve the materials and designs used in topical wound care in order to efficiently release antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative compounds speeding up the endogenous healing process. Nanostructured dressings can overcome the limitations of the current coverings and, separately, natural origin components can also overcome the drawbacks of current antibiotics and antiseptics (mainly cytotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and allergies). The combination of natural origin components with demonstrated antibiotic, regenerative, or anti-inflammatory properties together with nanostructured materials is a promising approach to fulfil all the requirements needed for the next generation of bioactive wound dressings. Microbially compromised wounds have been treated with different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative components but the available evidence is limited and insufficient to be able to draw reliable conclusions and to extrapolate those findings to the clinical practice. The evidence and some promising preliminary results indicate that future comparative studies are justified but instead of talking about the beneficial or inert effects of those natural origin occurring materials, the scientific community leads towards the identification of the main active components involved and their mechanism of action during the corresponding healing, antimicrobial, or regenerative processes and in carrying out systematic and comparative controlled tests. Once those natural origin components have been identified and their efficacy validated through solid clinical trials, their combination within nanostructured dressings can open up new avenues in the fabrication of bioactive dressings with outstanding characteristics for wound care. The motivation of this work is to analyze the state of the art in the use of different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring materials as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative components with the aim of clarifying their potential clinical use in bioactive dressings. We conclude that, for those natural occurring materials, more clinical trials are needed to reach a sufficient level of evidence as therapeutic agents for wound healing management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutics Delivery Systems for Regenerative Nanomedicine)

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