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Special Issue "Textile Composites"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Yong Sheng

School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT, Leeds, UK
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Textile composites represent a broad class of advanced materials which are reinforced by textile preforms. They have been increasingly applied in many engineering and manufacturing areas, such as automotive, aerospace, civil infrastructure, maritime, sporting construction and for biomedical applications, due to the fact that they can significantly improve the performance of composite structures and reduce manufacturing costs. In particular, the fibre reinforcements made by the processes of weaving, braiding, stitching and knitting can provide three-dimensional effects to improve resistance to delamination and impact. Another advantage of textile composites lies in their automated manufacturing processes which can produce more cost effective and complex composite structural components.

With the predicted global market for textile composites exceeding 65 Billion USD by 2020 (marketsandmarkets.com), there is no doubt that there will be a far wider range of applications using textile composites, and along with it, more demands to improve the design and manufacture techniques in order to produce better performance and more cost effective composite materials. These demands will also present new challenges to the research community to overcome issues that are impeding the wider application of textile composites. For example, there are uncertainties in the mechanical performance of some textile composites made by certain design and manufacturing methods and more experimental and modelling efforts are required to provide better understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the textile composites.

Therefore, it is my pleasure to have this opportunity to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue to report latest research developments on textile composites. Full technical papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Yong Sheng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

•    Advanced manufacturing processes
•    Mechanical design of textile composites
•    Characterization of textile preforms
•    Mechanical and thermal behaviour of textile composites
•    Numerical methods and simulation of textile composites

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Mechanical Properties of Nonwoven Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyurethane Composites
Materials 2017, 10(6), 618; doi:10.3390/ma10060618
Received: 4 May 2017 / Revised: 28 May 2017 / Accepted: 28 May 2017 / Published: 5 June 2017
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Abstract
Reinforcement of flexible fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) composites with standard textile fibres is a potential low cost solution to less critical loading applications. The mechanical behaviour of FRPs based on mechanically bonded nonwoven preforms composed of either low or high modulus fibres in
[...] Read more.
Reinforcement of flexible fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) composites with standard textile fibres is a potential low cost solution to less critical loading applications. The mechanical behaviour of FRPs based on mechanically bonded nonwoven preforms composed of either low or high modulus fibres in a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) matrix were compared following compression moulding. Nonwoven preform fibre compositions were selected from lyocell, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyamide (PA) as well as para-aramid fibres (polyphenylene terephthalamide; PPTA). Reinforcement with standard fibres manifold improved the tensile modulus and strength of the reinforced composites and the relationship between fibre, fabric and composite’s mechanical properties was studied. The linear density of fibres and the punch density, a key process variable used to consolidate the nonwoven preform, were varied to study the influence on resulting FRP mechanical properties. In summary, increasing the strength and degree of consolidation of nonwoven preforms did not translate to an increase in the strength of resulting fibre reinforced TPU-composites. The TPU composite strength was mainly dependent upon constituent fibre stress-strain behaviour and fibre segment orientation distribution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textile Composites)
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Open AccessArticle Catastrophic Failure and Critical Scaling Laws of Fiber Bundle Material
Materials 2017, 10(5), 515; doi:10.3390/ma10050515
Received: 28 March 2017 / Revised: 28 April 2017 / Accepted: 5 May 2017 / Published: 9 May 2017
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Abstract
This paper presents a spring-fiber bundle model used to describe the failure process induced by energy release in heterogeneous materials. The conditions that induce catastrophic failure are determined by geometric conditions and energy equilibrium. It is revealed that the relative rates of deformation
[...] Read more.
This paper presents a spring-fiber bundle model used to describe the failure process induced by energy release in heterogeneous materials. The conditions that induce catastrophic failure are determined by geometric conditions and energy equilibrium. It is revealed that the relative rates of deformation of, and damage to the fiber bundle with respect to the boundary controlling displacement ε0 exhibit universal power law behavior near the catastrophic point, with a critical exponent of −1/2. The proportion of the rate of response with respect to acceleration exhibits a linear relationship with increasing displacement in the vicinity of the catastrophic point. This allows for the prediction of catastrophic failure immediately prior to failure by extrapolating the trajectory of this relationship as it asymptotes to zero. Monte Carlo simulations are completed and these two critical scaling laws are confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textile Composites)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Biodegradation on the Structure and Properties of Windmill Palm (Trachycarpus fortunei) Fibers Using Different Chemical Treatments
Materials 2017, 10(5), 514; doi:10.3390/ma10050514
Received: 21 March 2017 / Revised: 4 May 2017 / Accepted: 5 May 2017 / Published: 9 May 2017
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Abstract
In this work, windmill palm fiber (WPF), alkali-treated fiber (AF) without hemicellulose and bleached fiber (BF) without lignin were prepared and buried in soil for 30, 60 and 90 days. The surface morphology, chemical composition, crystallinity degree, mechanical properties, and residual mass rate
[...] Read more.
In this work, windmill palm fiber (WPF), alkali-treated fiber (AF) without hemicellulose and bleached fiber (BF) without lignin were prepared and buried in soil for 30, 60 and 90 days. The surface morphology, chemical composition, crystallinity degree, mechanical properties, and residual mass rate of the samples, before and after biodegradation, were investigated. According to the results, soil burial degradation can remove the parenchyma cells and silica-bodies of WPF and deplete droplets containing the lignin of alkali-treated fiber after it has been buried for 30 days (AF30), and degradation of the single fiber cell wall of bleached fiber after it has been buried for 30 days (BF30). Buried in natural soil, lignin has a slower degradation rate than that of hemicellulose. WPF showed no significant differences in tensile strength after burial in soil for 90 days, because of the integrity fiber structure decreased the biodegradation. The most serious decrease, about 43%, in tensile strength occurred in AF after it had been buried for 90 days (BF90). This basic knowledge may be helpful for windmill palm fiber applications, especially for biodegradable composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textile Composites)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Optimizing Polymer Infusion Process for Thin Ply Textile Composites with Novel Matrix System
Materials 2017, 10(3), 293; doi:10.3390/ma10030293
Received: 9 January 2017 / Revised: 3 March 2017 / Accepted: 13 March 2017 / Published: 15 March 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (6034 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
For mass production of structural composites, use of different textile patterns, custom preforming, room temperature cure high performance polymers and simplistic manufacturing approaches are desired. Woven fabrics are widely used for infusion processes owing to their high permeability but their localised mechanical performance
[...] Read more.
For mass production of structural composites, use of different textile patterns, custom preforming, room temperature cure high performance polymers and simplistic manufacturing approaches are desired. Woven fabrics are widely used for infusion processes owing to their high permeability but their localised mechanical performance is affected due to inherent associated crimps. The current investigation deals with manufacturing low-weight textile carbon non-crimp fabrics (NCFs) composites with a room temperature cure epoxy and a novel liquid Methyl methacrylate (MMA) thermoplastic matrix, Elium®. Vacuum assisted resin infusion (VARI) process is chosen as a cost effective manufacturing technique. Process parameters optimisation is required for thin NCFs due to intrinsic resistance it offers to the polymer flow. Cycles of repetitive manufacturing studies were carried out to optimise the NCF-thermoset (TS) and NCF with novel reactive thermoplastic (TP) resin. It was noticed that the controlled and optimised usage of flow mesh, vacuum level and flow speed during the resin infusion plays a significant part in deciding the final quality of the fabricated composites. The material selections, the challenges met during the manufacturing and the methods to overcome these are deliberated in this paper. An optimal three stage vacuum technique developed to manufacture the TP and TS composites with high fibre volume and lower void content is established and presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textile Composites)
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Open AccessArticle Tensile and Flexural Properties of Cement Composites Reinforced with Flax Nonwoven Fabrics
Materials 2017, 10(2), 215; doi:10.3390/ma10020215
Received: 19 December 2016 / Revised: 27 January 2017 / Accepted: 20 February 2017 / Published: 22 February 2017
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Abstract
The aim of this study is to develop a process to produce high-performance cement-based composites reinforced with flax nonwoven fabrics, analyzing the influence of the fabric structure—thickness and entanglement—on mechanical behavior under flexural and tensile loadings. For this purpose, composite with flax nonwoven
[...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to develop a process to produce high-performance cement-based composites reinforced with flax nonwoven fabrics, analyzing the influence of the fabric structure—thickness and entanglement—on mechanical behavior under flexural and tensile loadings. For this purpose, composite with flax nonwoven fabrics with different thicknesses were first prepared and their cement infiltration was evaluated with backscattered electron (BSE) images. The nonwoven fabrics with the optimized thickness were then subjected to a water treatment to improve their stability to humid environments and the fiber-matrix adhesion. For a fixed thickness, the effect of the nonwoven entanglement on the mechanical behavior was evaluated under flexural and direct tension tests. The obtained results indicate that the flax nonwoven fabric reinforcement leads to cement composites with substantial enhancement of ductility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textile Composites)
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Open AccessArticle Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of CVI-Densified Composites at Fiber and Bundle Level
Materials 2016, 9(12), 1011; doi:10.3390/ma9121011
Received: 13 October 2016 / Revised: 25 November 2016 / Accepted: 29 November 2016 / Published: 13 December 2016
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Abstract
The evolution of the thermal conductivities of the unidirectional, 2D woven and 3D braided composites during the CVI (chemical vapor infiltration) process have been numerically studied by the finite element method. The results show that the dual-scale pores play an important role in
[...] Read more.
The evolution of the thermal conductivities of the unidirectional, 2D woven and 3D braided composites during the CVI (chemical vapor infiltration) process have been numerically studied by the finite element method. The results show that the dual-scale pores play an important role in the thermal conduction of the CVI-densified composites. According to our results, two thermal conductivity models applicable for CVI process have been developed. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the parameter with the most influence on the CVI-densified composites’ thermal conductivity is matrix cracking’s density, followed by volume fraction of the bundle and thermal conductance of the matrix cracks, finally by micro-porosity inside the bundles and macro-porosity between the bundles. The obtained results are well consistent with the reported data, thus our models could be useful for designing the processing and performance of the CVI-densified composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textile Composites)
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