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Special Issue "Highly Ordered Organic Thin Films"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Jan Genoe

IMEC International, Leuven, Belgium
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Guest Editor
Dr. Cédric Rolin

IMEC International, Leuven, Belgium
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Thirty years after the groundbreaking invention of the organic photovoltaic (OPV) and organic electroluminescent (OLED) devices by Prof. Tang, research in organic electronics is still vivid, with intense activity both in the academic and industrial worlds. Indeed, organic semiconductors (OSCs) are fascinating materials. At the core of this fascination are three aspects: The strong interaction with light that enables optoelectronic applications; the possibility to tailor molecular structure to meet the demands of specific applications; and the ability to form thin films at low temperature on large flexible substrates. In addition to OPV and OLED, other applications for these materials are organic thin film transistors, organic photodiodes and organic light emitting transistors. Harnessing the potential of OSCs into mass-produced devices has however proven challenging: They suffer from harsh competition of inorganic technologies. The rise of organic electronics still requires thin films with high performance and good mechanical and chemical stability.

One approach to meet these requirements is the enhancement of crystalline order in thin films of OSCs. Indeed, bulk single crystals display superior transport characteristics as compared to their polycrystalline or amorphous counterparts. Single crystalline thin films on inert substrates ideally combine the high performance of single crystals with the ease of integration of thin films. The recent development of processing methods to achieve highly ordered films of OSCs follows this trend. Unidirectional methods that separate the steps of nucleation and subsequent growth are very promising. Other approaches exist, such as templated growth, annealing, etc.

In this Special Issue, we are calling for papers that report on the growth of thin organic film with high order. We are broadly interested in fabrication methods for thin organic films of small molecules or polymers onto amorphous or crystalline substrates. The final applications may be among the ones cited above, though not exclusively.

Prof. Jan Genoe
Dr. Cedric Rolin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • organic electronics
  • organic semiconductor
  • OTFT
  • OLED
  • OPV
  • OPD
  • organic thin film
  • crystalline thin film
  • single crystalline film
  • organic crystal
  • meniscus guided coating
  • unidirectional solidification
  • shear coating
  • zone-casting
  • templated growth
  • epitaxy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle 320-nm Flexible Solution-Processed 2,7-dioctyl[1] benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene Transistors
Materials 2017, 10(8), 918; doi:10.3390/ma10080918
Received: 30 May 2017 / Revised: 18 July 2017 / Accepted: 2 August 2017 / Published: 9 August 2017
PDF Full-text (4252 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Flexible organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) have received extensive attention due to their outstanding advantages such as light weight, low cost, flexibility, large-area fabrication, and compatibility with solution-processed techniques. However, compared with a rigid substrate, it still remains a challenge to obtain good device
[...] Read more.
Flexible organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) have received extensive attention due to their outstanding advantages such as light weight, low cost, flexibility, large-area fabrication, and compatibility with solution-processed techniques. However, compared with a rigid substrate, it still remains a challenge to obtain good device performance by directly depositing solution-processed organic semiconductors onto an ultrathin plastic substrate. In this work, ultrathin flexible OTFTs are successfully fabricated based on spin-coated 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) films. The resulting device thickness is only ~320 nm, so the device has the ability to adhere well to a three-dimension curved surface. The ultrathin C8-BTBT OTFTs exhibit a mobility as high as 4.36 cm2 V−1 s−1 and an on/off current ratio of over 106. These results indicate the substantial promise of our ultrathin flexible C8-BTBT OTFTs for next-generation flexible and conformal electronic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Highly Ordered Organic Thin Films)
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Open AccessArticle Steering the Properties of MoOx Hole Transporting Layers in OPVs and OLEDs: Interface Morphology vs. Electronic Structure
Materials 2017, 10(2), 123; doi:10.3390/ma10020123
Received: 19 December 2016 / Accepted: 27 January 2017 / Published: 30 January 2017
PDF Full-text (3597 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The identification, fine‐tuning, and process optimization of appropriate hole transporting layers (HTLs) for organic solar cells is indispensable for the production of efficient and sustainable functional devices. In this study, the optimization of a solution‐processed molybdenum oxide (MoOx) layer fabricated from a combustion
[...] Read more.
The identification, fine‐tuning, and process optimization of appropriate hole transporting layers (HTLs) for organic solar cells is indispensable for the production of efficient and sustainable functional devices. In this study, the optimization of a solution‐processed molybdenum oxide (MoOx) layer fabricated from a combustion precursor is carried out via the introduction of zirconium and tin additives. The evaluation of the output characteristics of both organic photovoltaic (OPV) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices demonstrates the beneficial influence upon the addition of the Zr and Sn ions compared to the generic MoOx precursor. A dopant effect in which the heteroatoms and the molybdenum oxide form a chemical identity with fundamentally different structural properties could not be observed, as the additives do not affect the molybdenum oxide composition or electronic band structure. An improved surface roughness due to a reduced crystallinity was found to be a key parameter leading to the superior performance of the devices employing modified HTLs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Highly Ordered Organic Thin Films)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Hole-Transporting Materials for Printable Perovskite Solar Cells
Materials 2017, 10(9), 1087; doi:10.3390/ma10091087
Received: 19 August 2017 / Revised: 6 September 2017 / Accepted: 12 September 2017 / Published: 15 September 2017
PDF Full-text (7590 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) represent undoubtedly the most significant breakthrough in photovoltaic technology since the 1970s, with an increase in their power conversion efficiency from less than 5% to over 22% in just a few years. Hole-transporting materials (HTMs) are an essential building
[...] Read more.
Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) represent undoubtedly the most significant breakthrough in photovoltaic technology since the 1970s, with an increase in their power conversion efficiency from less than 5% to over 22% in just a few years. Hole-transporting materials (HTMs) are an essential building block of PSC architectures. Currently, 2,2’,7,7’-tetrakis-(N,N’-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9’-spirobifluorene), better known as spiro-OMeTAD, is the most widely-used HTM to obtain high-efficiency devices. However, it is a tremendously expensive material with mediocre hole carrier mobility. To ensure wide-scale application of PSC-based technologies, alternative HTMs are being proposed. Solution-processable HTMs are crucial to develop inexpensive, high-throughput and printable large-area PSCs. In this review, we present the most recent advances in the design and development of different types of HTMs, with a particular focus on mesoscopic PSCs. Finally, we outline possible future research directions for further optimization of the HTMs to achieve low-cost, stable and large-area PSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Highly Ordered Organic Thin Films)
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