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Special Issue "Nanocellulose-Based Functional Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tommaso Carofiglio

Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 1, 35131 Padova, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39(0)49 827 5287
Fax: +39(0)49 827 5239

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanocellulose (NC) is a collective term that refers to cellulose-based nanomaterials such as Nanocrystalline Cellulose (NCC), microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), and bacterial cellulose (BC). Owing to a superior chemical and electrochemical stability, excellent mechanical strength and stiffness, large surface area and its light weight, as well as wide availability, renewability, and biodegradability, NC materials have drawn extensive attention as sustainable and cost-effective additives in composite materials, transparent and flexible films. In addition, many reports have recently been published that focus on the creation of advanced cellulose-based functional nanomaterials through the grafting of functional molecules onto the cellulosic surface; a task facilitated by the abundant presence of hydroxyl groups that can be exploited as the attaching point for a variety of organic functionalities according to the well-consolidated polysaccharide chemistry.

This Special Issue aims to cover relevant research in the field of NC-based materials. In particular, manuscripts presenting innovative composites as well as new functional materials are most welcome. Further, the subjects of the manuscripts can include, without being limited to, the following research areas: 1) NC-based composite nanomaterials possessing optical, electronic, magnetic properties for applications in the fields of energy storage, flexible electronics, fire-resistant fabrics, sensor actuators, electro-active materials, and absorbents for catalyst support and environmental remediation; 2) covalent functionalization of NC with the purpose of preparing new smart materials for chemical and biochemical applications in the fields of catalysis, chemical sensing, drug delivery and regenerative medicine; 3) use of NC-based materials for the improvement of paper properties in paper-crafting and the production of security paper, printed electronics and paper-based microfluidic devices (µPADs).

Prof. Dr. Tommaso Carofiglio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanocrystalline Cellulose
  • Microfibrillated Cellulose
  • Bacterial Cellulose
  • Functional Materials
  • Cellulose Nanocomposites

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Study on Thermal and Nanomechanical Performance of Cellulose Nanomaterials (CNs)
Materials 2017, 10(7), 718; doi:10.3390/ma10070718
Received: 3 May 2017 / Revised: 11 June 2017 / Accepted: 23 June 2017 / Published: 28 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1751 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wood-based cellulose nanomaterials (CNs) (specifically, cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs)) are environmentally sourced low-impact materials with remarkable thermal, mechanical, and physical properties. This uniqueness makes them great candidates for creating nanocomposite materials with a wide range of attributes. Investigating the morphological,
[...] Read more.
Wood-based cellulose nanomaterials (CNs) (specifically, cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs)) are environmentally sourced low-impact materials with remarkable thermal, mechanical, and physical properties. This uniqueness makes them great candidates for creating nanocomposite materials with a wide range of attributes. Investigating the morphological, thermal, and nanomechanical properties of CNs becomes crucial to intelligent development of novel composite materials. An atomic force microscope equipped with a nanoindenter was used to investigate the compression modulus of CNFs and CNCs using two analytical approaches (denoted as Oliver Pharr (OP) and Fused Silica (FS)). The CNC modulus values (ECNC-FS = 21.1 GPa, ECNC-OP = 28.7 GPa) were statistically larger than those obtained from CNFs (ECNF-FS = 12.4 GPa, ECNF-OP = 15.1 GPa). Additionally, the FS analytical approach provided statistically significant lower estimates. Thermal stability of CNFs and CNCs was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis. Significant differences were found between CNF and CNC onset temperatures (OnsetCNC = 228.2 °C, OnsetCNF = 279.9 °C), decomposition temperatures (DTGACNC = 247.9 °C, DTGACNF = 331.4 °C), and residues (ResidueCNC = 34.4%, ResidueCNF = 22.8%). This research enriches the information on thermal stability and nanomechanical performance of cellulose nanomaterials, and provides increased knowledge on understanding the effect of CNs as a matrix or reinforce in composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose-Based Functional Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Cellulose Nanocrystal Membranes as Excipients for Drug Delivery Systems
Materials 2016, 9(12), 1002; doi:10.3390/ma9121002
Received: 30 October 2016 / Revised: 18 November 2016 / Accepted: 2 December 2016 / Published: 12 December 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3139 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were obtained from flax fibers by an acid hydrolysis assisted by sonochemistry in order to reduce reaction times. The cavitation inducted during hydrolysis resulted in CNC with uniform shapes, and thus further pretreatments into the cellulose are
[...] Read more.
In this work, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were obtained from flax fibers by an acid hydrolysis assisted by sonochemistry in order to reduce reaction times. The cavitation inducted during hydrolysis resulted in CNC with uniform shapes, and thus further pretreatments into the cellulose are not required. The obtained CNC exhibited a homogeneous morphology and high crystallinity, as well as typical values for surface charge. Additionally, CNC membranes were developed from CNC solution to evaluation as a drug delivery system by the incorporation of a model drug. The drug delivery studies were carried out using chlorhexidine (CHX) as a drug and the antimicrobial efficiency of the CNC membrane loaded with CHX was examined against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. Aureus). The release of CHX from the CNC membranes is determined by UV-Vis. The obtaining methodology of the membranes proved to be simple, and these early studies showed a potential use in antibiotic drug delivery systems due to the release kinetics and the satisfactory antimicrobial activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose-Based Functional Materials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Cellulose-Based Smart Fluids under Applied Electric Fields
Materials 2017, 10(9), 1060; doi:10.3390/ma10091060
Received: 10 August 2017 / Revised: 7 September 2017 / Accepted: 8 September 2017 / Published: 10 September 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5492 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cellulose particles, their derivatives and composites have special environmentally benign features and are abundant in nature with their various applications. This review paper introduces the essential properties of several types of cellulose and their derivatives obtained from various source materials, and their use
[...] Read more.
Cellulose particles, their derivatives and composites have special environmentally benign features and are abundant in nature with their various applications. This review paper introduces the essential properties of several types of cellulose and their derivatives obtained from various source materials, and their use in electro-responsive electrorheological (ER) suspensions, which are smart fluid systems that are actively responsive under applied electric fields, while, at zero electric field, ER fluids retain a liquid-like state. Given the actively controllable characteristics of cellulose-based smart ER fluids under an applied electric field regarding their rheological and dielectric properties, they can potentially be applied for various industrial devices including dampers and haptic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose-Based Functional Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Potential Applications of Nanocellulose-Containing Materials in the Biomedical Field
Materials 2017, 10(8), 977; doi:10.3390/ma10080977
Received: 29 June 2017 / Revised: 11 August 2017 / Accepted: 16 August 2017 / Published: 21 August 2017
PDF Full-text (4043 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Because of its high biocompatibility, bio-degradability, low-cost and easy availability, cellulose finds application in disparate areas of research. Here we focus our attention on the most recent and attractive potential applications of cellulose in the biomedical field. We first describe the chemical/structural composition
[...] Read more.
Because of its high biocompatibility, bio-degradability, low-cost and easy availability, cellulose finds application in disparate areas of research. Here we focus our attention on the most recent and attractive potential applications of cellulose in the biomedical field. We first describe the chemical/structural composition of cellulose fibers, the cellulose sources/features and cellulose chemical modifications employed to improve its properties. We then move to the description of cellulose potential applications in biomedicine. In this field, cellulose is most considered in recent research in the form of nano-sized particle, i.e., nanofiber cellulose (NFC) or cellulose nanocrystal (CNC). NFC is obtained from cellulose via chemical and mechanical methods. CNC can be obtained from macroscopic or microscopic forms of cellulose following strong acid hydrolysis. NFC and CNC are used for several reasons including the mechanical properties, the extended surface area and the low toxicity. Here we present some potential applications of nano-sized cellulose in the fields of wound healing, bone-cartilage regeneration, dental application and different human diseases including cancer. To witness the close proximity of nano-sized cellulose to the practical biomedical use, examples of recent clinical trials are also reported. Altogether, the described examples strongly support the enormous application potential of nano-sized cellulose in the biomedical field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose-Based Functional Materials)
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