E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Mechanical Properties of Additive Structures in Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Robert Lancaster

Institute of Structural Materials, Swansea University, Bay Campus, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: advanced manufacturing methods; small-scale testing; thermo-mechanical fatigue; fatigue lifing; failure analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Additive layer manufacturing (ALM) is a rapidly-growing technology, receiving widespread attention from a multitude of industrial sectors for component repair and manufacturing. The emergence of ALM is linked to the significant benefits that the process can offer, compared to more conventional manufacturing processes, such as forging or casting. These include considerable cost savings due to less material wastage, short lead times and improved buy-to-fly ratios. ALM is a process that involves the net-shape fabrication of a three-dimensional structure by fusing powders with a high-energy heat source on a layer-by-layer basis to enable the production of highly intricate components that would not be possible with more traditional methods.

Now there is a considerable drive to realise the successful implementation of these technologies into high level critical parts but a comprehensive assessment is still required of the relationships between key process variables, geometries, resultant transient microstructures, and mechanical properties for any given component.

This Special Issue will collate a series of contributions from scientists around the world currently studying the mechanical behaviour of a variety of additive based materials and structures. It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Robert Lancaster
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • additive manufacturing
  • 3D printing
  • powder bed
  • material deposition
  • material addition
  • blown powder
  • metals
  • mechanical properties
  • damage mechanisms

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Tensile Fracture Behavior and Failure Mechanism of Additively-Manufactured AISI 4140 Low Alloy Steel by Laser Engineered Net Shaping
Materials 2017, 10(11), 1283; doi:10.3390/ma10111283
Received: 30 August 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
PDF Full-text (6325 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
AISI 4140 powder was directly deposited on AISI 4140 wrought substrate using laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility of a LENS-deposited part with the substrate. Tensile testing at room temperature was performed to evaluate the interface bond performance and fracture
[...] Read more.
AISI 4140 powder was directly deposited on AISI 4140 wrought substrate using laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility of a LENS-deposited part with the substrate. Tensile testing at room temperature was performed to evaluate the interface bond performance and fracture behavior of the test specimens. All the samples failed within the as-deposited zone, indicating that the interfacial bond is stronger than the interlayer bond inside the deposit. The fracture surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS). Results show that the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part is primarily affected by lack-of-fusion defects, carbide precipitation, and oxide particles inclusions, which causes premature failure of the deposit by deteriorating the mechanical properties and structural integrity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Properties of Additive Structures in Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Effect of Molten Pool Size on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy
Materials 2017, 10(7), 749; doi:10.3390/ma10070749
Received: 29 May 2017 / Revised: 25 June 2017 / Accepted: 29 June 2017 / Published: 4 July 2017
PDF Full-text (8625 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) technique is a cost-competitive and efficient technology to produce large structure components in industry domains. Mechanical properties are mainly dominated by the microstructure of the components, which is deeply affected by the molten pool size. In this work,
[...] Read more.
Wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) technique is a cost-competitive and efficient technology to produce large structure components in industry domains. Mechanical properties are mainly dominated by the microstructure of the components, which is deeply affected by the molten pool size. In this work, to investigate the effect of the molten pool size on microstructure and mechanical properties of the components, a series of Ti-6Al-4V alloy blocks with different width of molten pool (WMP) ranging from 7 mm to 22 mm were deposited by adjusting the wire feed speed (WFS) from 100 cm/min to 500 cm/min. It is interesting to find that the macrostructure changes from columnar grains to equiaxial grains, and then returns to large columnar grains with the increase of WMP, which is mainly caused by the different cooling rates and thermal gradients. Nonetheless, the tensile properties of the components have a tendency to decline with the increase of WMP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Properties of Additive Structures in Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top