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Special Issue "Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jeffrey W. Fergus

Auburn University, Materials Research and Education Center, 275 Wilmore Laboratorie, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 1-334-844-3405
Fax: +1 334 844 3400
Interests: materials for electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, batteries, sensors; high temperature materials degradation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Improvements in the performance of lithium ion batteries are needed to meet the energy storage requirements for electrical vehicles, portable electronics and other applications. These performance improvements depend on the development of new and advanced materials. Needed improvements include electrode materials with increased capacity, extended voltage range and long lifetime (e.g., cyclability) as well as electrolyte materials with high conductivity and stability. The performance of battery materials depends critically on their microstructures, which requires the development of materials processing techniques to obtain the desired microstructures and morphologies. This special issue will focus on materials and processes for obtaining lithium ion battery anodes, cathodes and electrolytes that meet the increasing performance demands in mobile energy storage.

Prof. Dr. Jeffrey W. Fergus
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • Li-ion conduction
  • Li ion battery anode materials
  • Li ion battery cathode materials
  • solid electrolytes
  • composite electrodes
  • high voltage cathodes

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Structural, Transport and Electrochemical Properties of LiFePO4 Substituted in Lithium and Iron Sublattices (Al, Zr, W, Mn, Co and Ni)
Materials 2013, 6(5), 1656-1687; doi:10.3390/ma6051656
Received: 18 December 2012 / Revised: 15 March 2013 / Accepted: 2 April 2013 / Published: 29 April 2013
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (3030 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
LiFePO4 is considered to be one of the most promising cathode materials for lithium ion batteries for electric vehicle (EV) application. However, there are still a number of unsolved issues regarding the influence of Li and Fe-site substitution on the physicochemical properties
[...] Read more.
LiFePO4 is considered to be one of the most promising cathode materials for lithium ion batteries for electric vehicle (EV) application. However, there are still a number of unsolved issues regarding the influence of Li and Fe-site substitution on the physicochemical properties of LiFePO4. This is a review-type article, presenting results of our group, related to the possibility of the chemical modification of phosphoolivine by introduction of cation dopants in Li and Fe sublattices. Along with a synthetic review of previous papers, a large number of new results are included. The possibility of substitution of Li+ by Al3+, Zr4+, W6+ and its influence on the physicochemical properties of LiFePO4 was investigated by means of XRD, SEM/EDS, electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements. The range of solid solution formation in Li1−3xAlxFePO4, Li1−4xZrxFePO4 and Li1−6xWxFePO4 materials was found to be very narrow. Transport properties of the synthesized materials were found to be rather weakly dependent on the chemical composition. The battery performance of selected olivines was tested by cyclic voltammetry (CV). In the case of LiFe1−yMyPO4 (M = Mn, Co and Ni), solid solution formation was observed over a large range of y (0 < y ≤ 1). An increase of electrical conductivity for the substitution level y = 0.25 was observed. Electrons of 3d metals other than iron do not contribute to the electrical properties of LiFe1−yMyPO4, and substitution level y > 0.25 leads to considerably lower values of σ. The activated character of electrical conductivity with a rather weak temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient suggests a small polaron-type conduction mechanism. The electrochemical properties of LiFe1−yMyPO4 strongly depend on the Fe substitution level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries)
Open AccessArticle Structural and Electrochemical Investigation during the First Charging Cycles of Silicon Microwire Array Anodes for High Capacity Lithium Ion Batteries
Materials 2013, 6(2), 626-636; doi:10.3390/ma6020626
Received: 10 December 2012 / Revised: 4 February 2013 / Accepted: 19 February 2013 / Published: 22 February 2013
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (1867 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Silicon microwire arrays embedded in Cu present exceptional performance as anode material in Li ion batteries. The processes occurring during the first charging cycles of batteries with this anode are essential for good performance. This paper sheds light on the electrochemical and structural
[...] Read more.
Silicon microwire arrays embedded in Cu present exceptional performance as anode material in Li ion batteries. The processes occurring during the first charging cycles of batteries with this anode are essential for good performance. This paper sheds light on the electrochemical and structural properties of the anodes during the first charging cycles. Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffractommetry, and fast Fourier transformation impedance spectroscopy are used for the characterization. It was found that crystalline phases with high Li content are obtained after the first lithiation cycle, while for the second lithiation just crystalline phases with less Li are observable, indicating that the lithiated wires become amorphous upon cycling. The formation of a solid electrolyte interface of around 250 nm during the first lithiation cycle is evidenced, and is considered a necessary component for the good cycling performance of the wires. Analog to voltammetric techniques, impedance spectroscopy is confirmed as a powerful tool to identify the formation of the different Si-Li phases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Self-Assembly of Bi2Te3-Nanoplate/Graphene-Nanosheet Hybrid by One-Pot Route and Its Improved Li-Storage Properties
Materials 2012, 5(7), 1275-1284; doi:10.3390/ma5071275
Received: 12 June 2012 / Revised: 5 July 2012 / Accepted: 10 July 2012 / Published: 23 July 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (4401 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A sandwich structured Bi2Te3-nanoplates/graphene-nanosheet (Bi2Te3/G) hybrid has been synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal route and has been investigated as a potential anode material for Li-ion batteries. Bi2Te3 grows during the
[...] Read more.
A sandwich structured Bi2Te3-nanoplates/graphene-nanosheet (Bi2Te3/G) hybrid has been synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal route and has been investigated as a potential anode material for Li-ion batteries. Bi2Te3 grows during the solvothermal process with the simultaneous reduction of graphite oxide into graphene. The in situ formation process of the hybrid has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectra. The Li-storage mechanism and performance of Bi2Te3/G and bare Bi2Te3 have been studied by galvanostatic cycling and cyclic voltammetry. The Bi2Te3/G sandwich exhibits an obviously improved cycling stability compared to bare Bi2Te3. The enhancement in electrochemical performance can be attributed to the combined conducting, confining and dispersing effects of graphene for Bi2Te3 nanoplates and to the self-assembled sandwich structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries)

Review

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Open AccessReview Advanced Electrodes for High Power Li-ion Batteries
Materials 2013, 6(3), 1028-1049; doi:10.3390/ma6031028
Received: 18 February 2013 / Revised: 11 March 2013 / Accepted: 12 March 2013 / Published: 15 March 2013
Cited by 51 | PDF Full-text (1325 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While little success has been obtained over the past few years in attempts to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries, significant improvement in the power density has been achieved, opening the route to new applications, from hybrid electric vehicles to high-power electronics and
[...] Read more.
While little success has been obtained over the past few years in attempts to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries, significant improvement in the power density has been achieved, opening the route to new applications, from hybrid electric vehicles to high-power electronics and regulation of the intermittency problem of electric energy supply on smart grids. This success has been achieved not only by decreasing the size of the active particles of the electrodes to few tens of nanometers, but also by surface modification and the synthesis of new multi-composite particles. It is the aim of this work to review the different approaches that have been successful to obtain Li-ion batteries with improved high-rate performance and to discuss how these results prefigure further improvement in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries)
Open AccessReview Recent Progress in Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries
Materials 2013, 6(1), 156-183; doi:10.3390/ma6010156
Received: 26 November 2012 / Revised: 24 December 2012 / Accepted: 26 December 2012 / Published: 10 January 2013
Cited by 95 | PDF Full-text (1281 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The development and commercialization of lithium ion batteries is rooted in material discovery. Promising new materials with high energy density are required for achieving the goal toward alternative forms of transportation. Over the past decade, significant progress and effort has been made in
[...] Read more.
The development and commercialization of lithium ion batteries is rooted in material discovery. Promising new materials with high energy density are required for achieving the goal toward alternative forms of transportation. Over the past decade, significant progress and effort has been made in developing the new generation of Li-ion battery materials. In the review, I will focus on the recent advance of tin- and silicon-based anode materials. Additionally, new polyoxyanion cathodes, such as phosphates and silicates as cathode materials, will also be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries)

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