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Special Issue "Recent Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Andrew J. Goudy (Website)

Department of Chemistry, Delaware State University, Dover, DE 19901, USA
Fax: +1 302 8576539
Interests: hydrogen storage in metal hydrides; complex hydrides; carbon-based materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Finding safe convenient ways to store hydrogen is perhaps the single most challenging problem facing the hydrogen economy. The ideal hydrogen storage material must have high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen capacities, thermodynamic properties which allow for hydrogen sorption at moderate temperatures and relatively rapid kinetics. To date, no solid state material has been identified that meets all these criteria. This special issue of “Materials” will be devoted recent advances in all areas of hydrogen storage research including metal hydrides, complex hydrides and carbon based materials. It will provide scientists from around the world with a mechanism for the exchange of ideas and the dissemination of knowledge in this field.

Prof. Dr. Andrew J. Goudy
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • hydrogen absorbing materials
  • metal hydrides
  • complex hydrides
  • chemical hydrides
  • borohydrides
  • alanates
  • amides
  • metal organic frameworks
  • organic scaffolds
  • carbon aerogels
  • alanes
  • nanostructured materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Study of Morphological Changes in MgH2 Destabilized LiBH4 Systems Using Computed X-ray Microtomography
Materials 2012, 5(10), 1740-1751; doi:10.3390/ma5101740
Received: 15 July 2012 / Revised: 25 August 2012 / Accepted: 4 September 2012 / Published: 26 September 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (958 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this study was to apply three-dimensional x-ray microtomographic imaging to understanding morphologies in the diphasic destabilized hydride system: MgH2 and LiBH4. Each of the single phase hydrides as well as two-phase mixtures at LiBH4:MgH [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to apply three-dimensional x-ray microtomographic imaging to understanding morphologies in the diphasic destabilized hydride system: MgH2 and LiBH4. Each of the single phase hydrides as well as two-phase mixtures at LiBH4:MgH2 ratios of 1:3, 1:1, and 2:1 were prepared by high energy ball milling for 5 minutes (with and without 4 mol % TiCl3 catalyst additions). Samples were imaged using computed microtomography in order to (i) establish measurement conditions leading to maximum absorption contrast between the two phases and (ii) determine interfacial volume. The optimal energy for measurement was determined to be 15 keV (having 18% transmission for the MgH2 phase and above 90% transmission for the LiBH4 phase). This work also focused on the determination of interfacial volume. Results showed that interfacial volume for each of the single phase systems, LiBH4 and MgH2, did not change much with catalysis using 4 mol % TiCl3. However, for the mixed composite system, interphase boundary volume was always higher in the catalyzed system; increasing from 15% to 33% in the 1:3 system, from 11% to 20% in the 1:1 system, and 2% to 14% in the 2:1 system. The parameters studied are expected to govern mass transport (i.e., diffusion) and ultimately lead to microstructure-based improvements on H2 desorption and uptake rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials)
Open AccessArticle Chemical Bonding of AlH3 Hydride by Al-L2,3 Electron Energy-Loss Spectra and First-Principles Calculations
Materials 2012, 5(4), 566-574; doi:10.3390/ma5040566
Received: 30 January 2012 / Revised: 20 March 2012 / Accepted: 22 March 2012 / Published: 30 March 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (521 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In a previous study, we used transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy to investigate dehydrogenation of AlH3 particles. In the present study, we systematically examine differences in the chemical bonding states of Al-containing compounds (including AlH3) by [...] Read more.
In a previous study, we used transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy to investigate dehydrogenation of AlH3 particles. In the present study, we systematically examine differences in the chemical bonding states of Al-containing compounds (including AlH3) by comparing their Al-L2,3 EEL spectra. The spectral chemical shift and the fine peak structure of the spectra were consistent with the degree of covalent bonding of Al. This finding will be useful for future nanoscale analysis of AlH3 dehydrogenation toward the cell. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials)
Open AccessArticle Molecular Beam-Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (MB-TDS) Monitoring of Hydrogen Desorbed from Storage Fuel Cell Anodes
Materials 2012, 5(2), 248-257; doi:10.3390/ma5020248
Received: 22 December 2011 / Revised: 28 January 2012 / Accepted: 31 January 2012 / Published: 6 February 2012
PDF Full-text (386 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA) MlNi3.6Co0.85Al0.3Mn0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal), chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). [...] Read more.
Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA) MlNi3.6Co0.85Al0.3Mn0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal), chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The recently developed molecular beam—thermal desorption spectrometry (MB-TDS) technique is here reported for detecting the electrochemical hydrogen uptake and release by the treated HSA. The MB-TDS allows an accurate determination of the hydrogen mass absorbed into the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA), and has significant advantages in comparison with the conventional TDS method. Experimental data has revealed that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using such chemically treated alloy presents an enhanced surface capability for hydrogen adsorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Kinetics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Mg2Ni-type Alloy by Melt Spinning
Materials 2011, 4(1), 274-287; doi:10.3390/ma4010274
Received: 24 November 2010 / Revised: 4 January 2011 / Accepted: 13 January 2011 / Published: 18 January 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (992 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mg2Ni-type Mg2Ni1−xCox (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrogen [...] Read more.
Mg2Ni-type Mg2Ni1−xCox (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys was tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The results show that the as-spun (x = 0.1) alloy exhibits a typical nanocrystalline structure, while the as-spun (x = 0.4) alloy displays a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, confirming that the substitution of Co for Ni notably intensifies the glass forming ability of the Mg2Ni-type alloy. The melt spinning treatment notably improves the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD) of the alloys. With an increase in the spinning rate from 0 (as-cast is defined as spinning rate of 0 m/s) to 30 m/s, the hydrogen absorption saturation ratio () of the (x = 0.4) alloy increases from 77.1 to 93.5%, the hydrogen desorption ratio () from 54.5 to 70.2%, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D) from 0.75 × 1011 to 3.88 × 1011 cm2/s and the limiting current density IL from 150.9 to 887.4 mA/g. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials)

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