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Special Issue "Electrospun Materials 2018"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Vitor Sencadas

School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Science, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Electroactive polymers; Biomedical Polymer materials; Bone Regeneration, Innovative Polymer Processing Techniques

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electrospinning is an easy and versatile technique to produce organic and inorganic fibers with average diameters ranging from a few nanometers up to a few micrometers. The ability to tune the fiber diameter allows control of the material surface area, as well as surface functionality, ultimately leading to a superior mechanical property of this materials. This Special Issue focuses on the latest developments and findings on electrospun materials for a wide range of applications, e.g., biomedical, bio-interfaces, wastewater management, oil spills, air pollution control, energy harvesting, and storage.

We are pleased to invite you to submit manuscripts for the Special Issue on “Electrospun Materials” in the form of full research papers, communications, and review articles. We look forward to your contribution to this Special Issue.


Dr. Vitor Sencadas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrospun Materials
  • Wound Healing
  • Biopolymers
  • Electroactive Polymers
  • Bio-interfaces
  • Wastewater Management
  • Water and Air Pollution and Filtration
  • Energy Harvesting and Storage
  • Hierarchical Nanofibers
  • Food and Packaging Applications

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Electrospun PVA/Bentonite Nanocomposites Mats for Drug Delivery
Materials 2017, 10(12), 1448; doi:10.3390/ma10121448
Received: 17 November 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 20 December 2017
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Abstract
Electrospun mats and films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel are produced for drug delivery. To provide mechanical consistency to the gel a reinforcement by nanoclays is introduced in the polymer matrix. Four different suspensions of nanoparticles in the polymer solution are prepared in
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Electrospun mats and films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel are produced for drug delivery. To provide mechanical consistency to the gel a reinforcement by nanoclays is introduced in the polymer matrix. Four different suspensions of nanoparticles in the polymer solution are prepared in an adequate solvent. These suspensions are subjected to an electrospinning process to produce the nanofiber mat, while films are produced by casting. The influence of the process parameters over the nanofibers microstructure is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effectiveness of nanoclay encapsulation in the nanocomposites is tested by a thermogravimetric analysis. A crosslinking reaction in solution is carried out to prevent the dissolution of the nanocomposites in aqueous media. A model protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) is absorbed in the nanocomposites to characterize the release kinetics in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrospun Materials 2018)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Aminated Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Nanofibers for the Selective Removal of Pb(II) from Polluted Water
Materials 2017, 10(12), 1352; doi:10.3390/ma10121352
Received: 24 October 2017 / Revised: 20 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 24 November 2017
PDF Full-text (2878 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Electrospun nanofibers have been successfully applied to remove toxic and carcinogenic contaminants such as heavy metals from polluted water. In this study, an efficient adsorbent based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanofibers was developed following a cheap, versatile and scalable process. PET nanofibers were
[...] Read more.
Electrospun nanofibers have been successfully applied to remove toxic and carcinogenic contaminants such as heavy metals from polluted water. In this study, an efficient adsorbent based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanofibers was developed following a cheap, versatile and scalable process. PET nanofibers were first produced by electrospinning, and their surface was chemically functionalized using a simple aminolysis process. The capacity of the resulting material to adsorb Pb(II) from synthetic solutions was evaluated as a function of the contact time, pH, and initial metal ion concentration. The adsorbent system presented a quick kinetic adsorption, reaching an extremely high maximum adsorption capacity of about 50 millimol (mmol) of Pb(II) per gram of adsorbent system after just 30 min. Moreover, the effect of competing metal ions, such as Ni(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II), was studied at different molar ratios. Finally, when tested in continuous flow mode, aminated PET (APET) nanofibers were able to remove 97% of Pb(II) ions in solution, demonstrating their potential for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrospun Materials 2018)
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Open AccessArticle Measuring the Pull-Off Force of an Individual Fiber Using a Novel Picoindenter/Scanning Electron Microscope Technique
Materials 2017, 10(9), 1074; doi:10.3390/ma10091074
Received: 4 August 2017 / Revised: 10 September 2017 / Accepted: 11 September 2017 / Published: 13 September 2017
PDF Full-text (1315 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We employed a novel picoindenter (PI)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique to measure the pull-off force of an individual electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers. Individual fibers were deposited over a channel in a custom-designed silicon substrate, which was then attached to a picoindenter. The
[...] Read more.
We employed a novel picoindenter (PI)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique to measure the pull-off force of an individual electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers. Individual fibers were deposited over a channel in a custom-designed silicon substrate, which was then attached to a picoindenter. The picoindenter was then positioned firmly on the sample stage of the SEM. The picoindenter tip laterally pushed individual fibers to measure the force required to detach it from the surface of substrate. SEM was used to visualize and document the process. The measured pull-off force ranged between 5.8 ± 0.2 μN to ~17.8 ± 0.2 μN for individual fibers with average diameter ranging from 0.8 to 2.3 μm. Thus, this study, a first of its kind, demonstrates the use of a picoindenter to measure the pull-off force of a single micro/nanofiber. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrospun Materials 2018)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Electrospun Ceramic Nanofiber Mats Today: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications
Materials 2017, 10(11), 1238; doi:10.3390/ma10111238
Received: 14 September 2017 / Revised: 10 October 2017 / Accepted: 25 October 2017 / Published: 27 October 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (8064 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ceramic nanofibers (NFs) have recently been developed for advanced applications due to their unique properties. In this article, we review developments in electrospun ceramic NFs with regard to their fabrication process, properties, and applications. We find that surface activity of electrospun ceramic NFs
[...] Read more.
Ceramic nanofibers (NFs) have recently been developed for advanced applications due to their unique properties. In this article, we review developments in electrospun ceramic NFs with regard to their fabrication process, properties, and applications. We find that surface activity of electrospun ceramic NFs is improved by post pyrolysis, hydrothermal, and carbothermal processes. Also, when combined with another surface modification methods, electrospun ceramic NFs result in the advancement of properties and widening of the application domains. With the decrease in diameter and length of a fiber, many properties of fibrous materials are modified; characteristics of such ceramic NFs are different from their wide and long (bulk) counterparts. In this article, electrospun ceramic NFs are reviewed with an emphasis on their applications as catalysts, membranes, sensors, biomaterials, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, energy harvesting systems, electric and magnetic parts, conductive wires, and wearable electronic textiles. Furthermore, properties of ceramic nanofibers, which enable the above applications, and techniques to characterize them are briefly outlined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrospun Materials 2018)
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