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Special Issue "Corrosion Studies of Metal Matrix Composites/Alloys at Low and High Temperatures"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Joseph F. Chiang

Professor of Chemistry/Biochemistry State University of New York College at Oneonta Oneonta, NY 13820, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will present research and reviews on the subject of “Corrosion Studies of Metal Matrix Composites/Alloys at Low and High Temperatures”. Metal matrix composites/alloys (MMC/A) are among the most important structure materials in several industries, such as aerospace, automobiles and mineral applications, due to their high strength, high tensile, compressibility, and other mechanical properties. Studies of the corrosion of such metal matrix composites/alloys are of utmost importance for the fabrication of the material. Low density materials are essential from the structure point of view. Such materials can be produced with an appropriate coating to reduce corrosion rate, although not necessarily completely. Various metal matrix composites/alloys have been tested by different research groups, such as aluminum, titanium, iron, silicon, and many other metal matrices. Corrosion studies will therefore be our main discussion point in this Special Issue. However, we also wish to present various fabrications and properties of MMC/A.

Prof. Joseph F. Chiang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Corrosion
  • Metal matrix composites
  • Structure properties
  • Corrosion rate

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Stability of an Electrodeposited Nanocrystalline Ni-Based Alloy Coating in Oil and Gas Wells with the Coexistence of H2S and CO2
Materials 2017, 10(6), 632; doi:10.3390/ma10060632
Received: 25 April 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 7 June 2017 / Published: 9 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6910 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The stability of an electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-based alloy coating in a H2S/CO2 environment was investigated by electrochemical measurements, weight loss method, and surface characterization. The results showed that both the cathodic and anodic processes of the Ni-based alloy coating were
[...] Read more.
The stability of an electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-based alloy coating in a H2S/CO2 environment was investigated by electrochemical measurements, weight loss method, and surface characterization. The results showed that both the cathodic and anodic processes of the Ni-based alloy coating were simultaneously suppressed, displaying a dramatic decrease of the corrosion current density. The corrosion of the Ni-based alloy coating was controlled by H2S corrosion and showed general corrosion morphology under the test temperatures. The corrosion products, mainly consisting of Ni3S2, NiS, or Ni3S4, had excellent stability in acid solution. The corrosion rate decreased with the rise of temperature, while the adhesive force of the corrosion scale increased. With the rise of temperature, the deposited morphology and composition of corrosion products changed, the NiS content in the corrosion scale increased, and the stability and adhesive strength of the corrosion scale improved. The corrosion scale of the Ni-based alloy coating was stable, compact, had strong adhesion, and caused low weight loss, so the corrosion rates calculated by the weight loss method cannot reveal the actual oxidation rate of the coating. As the corrosion time was prolonged, the Ni-based coating was thinned while the corrosion scale thickened. The corrosion scale was closely combined with the coating, but cannot fully prevent the corrosive reactants from reaching the substrate. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Rare Earth Element Yttrium Modified Mg-Al-Zn Alloy: Microstructure, Degradation Properties and Hardness
Materials 2017, 10(5), 477; doi:10.3390/ma10050477
Received: 15 March 2017 / Revised: 12 April 2017 / Accepted: 26 April 2017 / Published: 28 April 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4238 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The overly-fast degradation rates of magnesium-based alloys in the biological environment have limited their applications as biodegradable bone implants. In this study, rare earth element yttrium (Y) was introduced into AZ61 magnesium alloy (Mg-6Al-1Zn wt %) to control the degradation rate by laser
[...] Read more.
The overly-fast degradation rates of magnesium-based alloys in the biological environment have limited their applications as biodegradable bone implants. In this study, rare earth element yttrium (Y) was introduced into AZ61 magnesium alloy (Mg-6Al-1Zn wt %) to control the degradation rate by laser rapid melting. The results showed that the degradation rate of AZ61 magnesium alloy was slowed down by adding Y. This was attributed to the reduction of Mg17Al12 phase and the formation of Al2Y phase that has a more active potential, which decreased galvanic corrosion resulting from its coupling with the anodic matrix phase. Meanwhile, the hardness increased as Y contents increased due to the uniform distribution of the Al2Y and Mg17Al12 phases. However, as the Y contents increased further, the formation of excessive Al2Y phase resulted in the increasing of degradation rate and the decreasing of hardness due to its agglomeration. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Tungsten Addition on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Fe-3.5B Alloy in Liquid Zinc
Materials 2017, 10(4), 399; doi:10.3390/ma10040399
Received: 19 February 2017 / Revised: 5 April 2017 / Accepted: 6 April 2017 / Published: 10 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (15746 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effects of tungsten addition on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe-3.5B alloys in a liquid zinc bath at 520 °C were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe micro-analysis. The microstructure evolution in different alloys is
[...] Read more.
The effects of tungsten addition on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe-3.5B alloys in a liquid zinc bath at 520 °C were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe micro-analysis. The microstructure evolution in different alloys is analyzed and discussed using an extrapolated Fe-B-W ternary phase diagram. Experimental results show that there are three kinds of borides, the reticular (Fe, W)2B, the rod-like (Fe, W)3B and flower-like FeWB. The addition of tungsten can refine the microstructure and improve the stability of the reticular borides. Besides, it is beneficial to the formation of the metastable (Fe, W)3B phase. The resultant Fe-3.5B-11W (wt %) alloy possesses excellent corrosion resistance to liquid zinc. When tungsten content exceeds 11 wt %, the formed flower-like FeWB phase destroys the integrity of the reticular borides and results in the deterioration of the corrosion resistance. Also, the corrosion failure resulting from the spalling of borides due to the initiation of micro-cracks in the grain boundary of borides is discussed in this paper. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Laser Shock Processing on Morphologies and Mechanical Properties of ANSI 304 Stainless Steel Weldments Subjected to Cavitation Erosion
Materials 2017, 10(3), 292; doi:10.3390/ma10030292
Received: 6 February 2017 / Revised: 5 March 2017 / Accepted: 10 March 2017 / Published: 15 March 2017
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Abstract
Effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on the cavitation erosion resistance of laser weldments were investigated by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, roughness tester, micro hardness tester, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology. The morphological microstructures were characterized. Cumulative mass loss,
[...] Read more.
Effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on the cavitation erosion resistance of laser weldments were investigated by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, roughness tester, micro hardness tester, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology. The morphological microstructures were characterized. Cumulative mass loss, incubation period, erosion rate, and damaged surface areas were monitored during cavitation erosion. Surface roughness, micro-hardness, and residual stress were measured in different zones. Results showed that LSP could improve the damage of morphological microstructures and mechanical properties after cavitation erosion. The compressive residual stresses were generated during the process of LSP, which was an effective guarantee for the improvement of the above mentioned properties. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Concrete Cracking Prediction Including the Filling Proportion of Strand Corrosion Products
Materials 2017, 10(1), 6; doi:10.3390/ma10010006
Received: 21 October 2016 / Revised: 1 December 2016 / Accepted: 20 December 2016 / Published: 23 December 2016
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Abstract
The filling of strand corrosion products during concrete crack propagation is investigated experimentally in the present paper. The effects of stirrups on the filling of corrosion products and concrete cracking are clarified. A prediction model of crack width is developed incorporating the filling
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The filling of strand corrosion products during concrete crack propagation is investigated experimentally in the present paper. The effects of stirrups on the filling of corrosion products and concrete cracking are clarified. A prediction model of crack width is developed incorporating the filling proportion of corrosion products and the twisting shape of the strand. Experimental data on cracking angle, crack width, and corrosion loss obtained from accelerated corrosion tests of concrete beams are presented. The proposed model is verified by experimental data. Results show that the filling extent of corrosion products varies with crack propagation. The rust filling extent increases with the propagating crack until a critical width. Beyond the critical width, the rust-filling extent remains stable. Using stirrups can decrease the critical crack width. Stirrups can restrict crack propagation and reduce the rust filling. The tangent of the cracking angle increases with increasing corrosion loss. The prediction of corrosion-induced crack is sensitive to the rust-filling extent. Full article
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