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Special Issue "Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Miguel Cervera

UPC-BarcelonaTECH & CIMNE, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: constitutive modelling; finite element formulations; nonlinear computational mechanics; thermo-mechanical simulation of casting; metal deposition; welding and related processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cohesive-frictional materials encompass natural and artificial, geological and construction materials (rocks, soils, concrete, mortar, masonry, etc.) and many granular materials and powders. The wide range of cohesive–fictional materials applications in different areas of science and engineering motivates our interest to understand the governing mechanics and also, to develop accurate and efficient computational models.

The field of Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials has undergone intense development over the last decades but is still very much in a phase of progression, with modern advances demonstrating the ability to solve materials problems with enhanced rigor and accuracy and to provide powerful new tools for engineering practice and materials design.

Both continuous and discontinuous approaches are currently used in the research of the computational mechanics of cohesive–frictional materials. On the one hand, continuous approaches focus on constitutive modeling, strain localization and failure, structural size effect, multi-scaling and micro-modelling. On the other hand, discontinuous approaches zoom in on dynamic and fast transient problems and stochastic properties. Both conceptualizations have expanded to tackle thermal and/or flow coupled problems.

This Special Issue will address the above mentioned research areas pertaining to the general theme of computational modeling of cohesive-frictional materials in applied sciences and engineering.

Prof. Dr. Miguel Cervera
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cohesive-fictional materials
  • computational mechanics
  • continuous and discontinuous models
  • localization and failure
  • multi-scale models

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Comparison of a Material Point Method and a Galerkin Meshfree Method for the Simulation of Cohesive-Frictional Materials
Materials 2017, 10(10), 1150; doi:10.3390/ma10101150
Received: 28 July 2017 / Revised: 21 September 2017 / Accepted: 25 September 2017 / Published: 30 September 2017
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Abstract
The simulation of large deformation problems, involving complex history-dependent constitutive laws, is of paramount importance in several engineering fields. Particular attention has to be paid to the choice of a suitable numerical technique such that reliable results can be obtained. In this paper,
[...] Read more.
The simulation of large deformation problems, involving complex history-dependent constitutive laws, is of paramount importance in several engineering fields. Particular attention has to be paid to the choice of a suitable numerical technique such that reliable results can be obtained. In this paper, a Material Point Method (MPM) and a Galerkin Meshfree Method (GMM) are presented and verified against classical benchmarks in solid mechanics. The aim is to demonstrate the good behavior of the methods in the simulation of cohesive-frictional materials, both in static and dynamic regimes and in problems dealing with large deformations. The vast majority of MPM techniques in the literatrue are based on some sort of explicit time integration. The techniques proposed in the current work, on the contrary, are based on implicit approaches, which can also be easily adapted to the simulation of static cases. The two methods are presented so as to highlight the similarities to rather than the differences from “standard” Updated Lagrangian (UL) approaches commonly employed by the Finite Elements (FE) community. Although both methods are able to give a good prediction, it is observed that, under very large deformation of the medium, GMM lacks robustness due to its meshfree natrue, which makes the definition of the meshless shape functions more difficult and expensive than in MPM. On the other hand, the mesh-based MPM is demonstrated to be more robust and reliable for extremely large deformation cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Adaptive Crack Modeling with Interface Solid Elements for Plain and Fiber Reinforced Concrete Structures
Materials 2017, 10(7), 771; doi:10.3390/ma10070771
Received: 28 April 2017 / Revised: 1 July 2017 / Accepted: 3 July 2017 / Published: 8 July 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5279 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effective analysis of the nonlinear behavior of cement-based engineering structures not only demands physically-reliable models, but also computationally-efficient algorithms. Based on a continuum interface element formulation that is suitable to capture complex cracking phenomena in concrete materials and structures, an adaptive mesh
[...] Read more.
The effective analysis of the nonlinear behavior of cement-based engineering structures not only demands physically-reliable models, but also computationally-efficient algorithms. Based on a continuum interface element formulation that is suitable to capture complex cracking phenomena in concrete materials and structures, an adaptive mesh processing technique is proposed for computational simulations of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures to progressively disintegrate the initial finite element mesh and to add degenerated solid elements into the interfacial gaps. In comparison with the implementation where the entire mesh is processed prior to the computation, the proposed adaptive cracking model allows simulating the failure behavior of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures with remarkably reduced computational expense. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Development of Viscoelastic Multi-Body Simulation and Impact Response Analysis of a Ballasted Railway Track under Cyclic Loading
Materials 2017, 10(6), 615; doi:10.3390/ma10060615
Received: 27 April 2017 / Revised: 30 May 2017 / Accepted: 31 May 2017 / Published: 3 June 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (13560 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Simulation of a large number of deformable bodies is often difficult because complex high-level modeling is required to address both multi-body contact and viscoelastic deformation. This necessitates the combined use of a discrete element method (DEM) and a finite element method (FEM). In
[...] Read more.
Simulation of a large number of deformable bodies is often difficult because complex high-level modeling is required to address both multi-body contact and viscoelastic deformation. This necessitates the combined use of a discrete element method (DEM) and a finite element method (FEM). In this study, a quadruple discrete element method (QDEM) was developed for dynamic analysis of viscoelastic materials using a simpler algorithm compared to the standard FEM. QDEM easily incorporates the contact algorithm used in DEM. As the first step toward multi-body simulation, the fundamental performance of QDEM was investigated for viscoelastic analysis. The amplitude and frequency of cantilever elastic vibration were nearly equal to those obtained by the standard FEM. A comparison of creep recovery tests with an analytical solution showed good agreement between them. In addition, good correlation between the attenuation degree and the real physical viscosity was confirmed for viscoelastic vibration analysis. Therefore, the high accuracy of QDEM in the fundamental analysis of infinitesimal viscoelastic deformations was verified. Finally, the impact response of a ballast and sleeper under cyclic loading on a railway track was analyzed using QDEM as an application of deformable multi-body dynamics. The results showed that the vibration of the ballasted track was qualitatively in good agreement with the actual measurements. Moreover, the ballast layer with high friction reduced the ballasted track deterioration. This study suggests that QDEM, as an alternative to DEM and FEM, can provide deeper insights into the contact dynamics of a large number of deformable bodies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials)
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Open AccessArticle A Constitutive Model for Soft Clays Incorporating Elastic and Plastic Cross-Anisotropy
Materials 2017, 10(6), 584; doi:10.3390/ma10060584
Received: 6 April 2017 / Revised: 16 May 2017 / Accepted: 17 May 2017 / Published: 25 May 2017
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Abstract
Natural clays exhibit a significant degree of anisotropy in their fabric, which initially is derived from the shape of the clay platelets, deposition process and one-dimensional consolidation. Various authors have proposed anisotropic elastoplastic models involving an inclined yield surface to reproduce anisotropic behavior
[...] Read more.
Natural clays exhibit a significant degree of anisotropy in their fabric, which initially is derived from the shape of the clay platelets, deposition process and one-dimensional consolidation. Various authors have proposed anisotropic elastoplastic models involving an inclined yield surface to reproduce anisotropic behavior of plastic nature. This paper presents a novel constitutive model for soft structured clays that includes anisotropic behavior both of elastic and plastic nature. The new model incorporates stress-dependent cross-anisotropic elastic behavior within the yield surface using three independent elastic parameters because natural clays exhibit cross-anisotropic (or transversely isotropic) behavior after deposition and consolidation. Thus, the model only incorporates an additional variable with a clear physical meaning, namely the ratio between horizontal and vertical stiffnesses, which can be analytically obtained from conventional laboratory tests. The model does not consider evolution of elastic anisotropy, but laboratory results show that large strains are necessary to cause noticeable changes in elastic anisotropic behavior. The model is able to capture initial non-vertical effective stress paths for undrained triaxial tests and to predict deviatoric strains during isotropic loading or unloading. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Influence of the Constitutive Model for Shotcrete on the Predicted Structural Behavior of the Shotcrete Shell of a Deep Tunnel
Materials 2017, 10(6), 577; doi:10.3390/ma10060577
Received: 14 April 2017 / Revised: 18 May 2017 / Accepted: 18 May 2017 / Published: 25 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (878 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the present paper is to investigate the influence of the constitutive model for shotcrete on the predicted displacements and stresses in shotcrete shells of deep tunnels. Previously proposed shotcrete models as well as a new extended damage plasticity model for
[...] Read more.
The aim of the present paper is to investigate the influence of the constitutive model for shotcrete on the predicted displacements and stresses in shotcrete shells of deep tunnels. Previously proposed shotcrete models as well as a new extended damage plasticity model for shotcrete are evaluated in the context of 2D finite element simulations of the excavation of a stretch of a deep tunnel by means of the New Austrian Tunneling Method. Thereby, the behavior of the surrounding rock mass is described by the commonly used Hoek–Brown model. Differences in predicted evolutions of displacements and stresses in the shotcrete shell, resulting from the different shotcrete models, are discussed and simulation results are compared to available in situ measurement data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Modelling of Fluidised Geomaterials: The Case of the Aberfan and the Gypsum Tailings Impoundment Flowslides
Materials 2017, 10(5), 562; doi:10.3390/ma10050562
Received: 22 February 2017 / Revised: 15 May 2017 / Accepted: 16 May 2017 / Published: 20 May 2017
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Abstract
The choice of a pure cohesive or a pure frictional viscoplastic model to represent the rheological behaviour of a flowslide is of paramount importance in order to obtain accurate results for real cases. The principal goal of the present work is to clarify
[...] Read more.
The choice of a pure cohesive or a pure frictional viscoplastic model to represent the rheological behaviour of a flowslide is of paramount importance in order to obtain accurate results for real cases. The principal goal of the present work is to clarify the influence of the type of viscous model—pure cohesive versus pure frictional—with the numerical reproduction of two different real flowslides that occurred in 1966: the Aberfan flowslide and the Gypsum tailings impoundment flowslide. In the present work, a depth-integrated model based on the v - p w Biot–Zienkiewicz formulation, enhanced with a diffusion-like equation to account for the pore pressure evolution within the soil mass, is applied to both 1966 cases. For the Aberfan flowslide, a frictional viscous model based on Perzyna viscoplasticity is considered, while a pure cohesive viscous model (Bingham model) is considered for the case of the Gypsum flowslide. The numerical approach followed is the SPH method, which has been enriched by adding a 1D finite difference grid to each SPH node in order to improve the description of the pore water evolution in the propagating mixture. The results obtained by the performed simulations are in agreement with the documentation obtained through the UK National Archive (Aberfan flowslide) and the International Commission of large Dams (Gypsum flowslide). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Strain Localization of Elastic-Damaging Frictional-Cohesive Materials: Analytical Results and Numerical Verification
Materials 2017, 10(4), 434; doi:10.3390/ma10040434
Received: 9 March 2017 / Revised: 1 April 2017 / Accepted: 18 April 2017 / Published: 20 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3718 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Damage-induced strain softening is of vital importance for the modeling of localized failure in frictional-cohesive materials. This paper addresses strain localization of damaging solids and the resulting consistent frictional-cohesive crack models. As a supplement to the framework recently established for stress-based continuum material
[...] Read more.
Damage-induced strain softening is of vital importance for the modeling of localized failure in frictional-cohesive materials. This paper addresses strain localization of damaging solids and the resulting consistent frictional-cohesive crack models. As a supplement to the framework recently established for stress-based continuum material models in rate form (Wu and Cervera 2015, 2016), several classical strain-based damage models, expressed usually in total and secant format, are considered. Upon strain localization of such damaging solids, Maxwell’s kinematics of a strong (or regularized) discontinuity has to be reproduced by the inelastic damage strains, which are defined by a bounded characteristic tensor and an unbounded scalar related to the damage variable. This kinematic constraint yields a set of nonlinear equations from which the discontinuity orientation and damage-type localized cohesive relations can be derived. It is found that for the “Simó and Ju 1987” isotropic damage model, the localization angles and the resulting cohesive model heavily depend on lateral deformations usually ignored in classical crack models for quasi-brittle solids. To remedy this inconsistency, a modified damage model is proposed. Its strain localization analysis naturally results in a consistent frictional-cohesive crack model of damage type, which can be regularized as a classical smeared crack model. The analytical results are numerically verified by the recently-proposed mixed stabilized finite element method, regarding a singly-perforated plate under uniaxial tension. Remarkably, for all of the damage models discussed in this work, the numerically-obtained localization angles agree almost exactly with the closed-form results. This agreement, on the one hand, consolidates the strain localization analysis based on Maxwell’s kinematics and, on the other hand, illustrates versatility of the mixed stabilized finite element method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials)
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Open AccessArticle An Energy-Equivalent d+/d Damage Model with Enhanced Microcrack Closure-Reopening Capabilities for Cohesive-Frictional Materials
Materials 2017, 10(4), 433; doi:10.3390/ma10040433
Received: 17 February 2017 / Revised: 12 April 2017 / Accepted: 18 April 2017 / Published: 20 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5987 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, an energy-equivalent orthotropic d+/d damage model for cohesive-frictional materials is formulated. Two essential mechanical features are addressed, the damage-induced anisotropy and the microcrack closure-reopening (MCR) effects, in order to provide an enhancement of the original d
[...] Read more.
In this paper, an energy-equivalent orthotropic d+/d damage model for cohesive-frictional materials is formulated. Two essential mechanical features are addressed, the damage-induced anisotropy and the microcrack closure-reopening (MCR) effects, in order to provide an enhancement of the original d+/d model proposed by Faria et al. 1998, while keeping its high algorithmic efficiency unaltered. First, in order to ensure the symmetry and positive definiteness of the secant operator, the new formulation is developed in an energy-equivalence framework. This proves thermodynamic consistency and allows one to describe a fundamental feature of the orthotropic damage models, i.e., the reduction of the Poisson’s ratio throughout the damage process. Secondly, a “multidirectional” damage procedure is presented to extend the MCR capabilities of the original model. The fundamental aspects of this approach, devised for generic cyclic conditions, lie in maintaining only two scalar damage variables in the constitutive law, while preserving memory of the degradation directionality. The enhanced unilateral capabilities are explored with reference to the problem of a panel subjected to in-plane cyclic shear, with or without vertical pre-compression; depending on the ratio between shear and pre-compression, an absent, a partial or a complete stiffness recovery is simulated with the new multidirectional procedure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Mechanics of Cohesive-Frictional Materials)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Modelling multiphase geomaterials at high temperature with application to strain localization and rapid catastrophic landslide
Lorenzo Sanavia†* and Toan Duc Cao‡                  
†University of Padova, Padova, Italy                  
‡ Texas Tech University, Texas, United States                


“Simulation of splitting failure and cover cracking of reinforced concrete by means of an embedded cohesive crack finite element”
Jaime Gálvez                      

Technical University of Madrid, UPM

 

 
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