E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Biointerfaces and Materials"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Erik Reimhult (Website1, Website2)

Head, Department of Nanobiotechnology, Instititute for Biologocially inspired materials, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Muthgasse 11-II, A-1190 Vienna, Austria
Interests: colloidal science; surface science; liquid interfaces; nanoscience; nanoparticles; lipid membranes; polymer brushes; biointerfaces; biosensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Materials in contact with biological systems are found everywhere in our everyday life. The research on materials for specific use in medical, biotechnological, and environmental applications is rapidly increasing alongside the increasing economic and societal importance of such materials. The interface between the engineered material and its biological environment, the biointerface, is the main determinant of how well the function of the material can be performed, be it a biosensor, implant material, cell culture platform, bioprocessing vessel or structural material. The research on biointerfaces spans the synthesis and structuring of novel polymer and inorganic surface modifications as well as the characterization of such interfaces for protein adsorption, cell interaction. Eventually, biointerface research also investigates the in vivo use of the material.

This special issue accepts submissions on all aspects of biointerfaces, but in particular solicits both experimental and theoretical contributions on the materials aspects of such interfaces, i.e.:

  • Polymer surface modifications
  • Surface functionalization
  • Protein and biomolecule interaction with engineered materials and interfaces
  • Patterning of biofunctionalities
  • Cell-surface interactions
  • Bacteria-surface interactions
  • Biosensors and measurement methods

Full manuscripts, communications and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Erik Reimhult
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • surface functionalization
  • polymer brush
  • hydroge
  • supported lipid membrane
  • cell-surface interactions
  • bacteria-surface interactions
  • biosensor
  • implant
  • resorbable
  • drug eluting
  • non-fouling
  • nanopatterning
  • micropatterning

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Microstructural Characterization of Calcite-Based Powder Materials Prepared by Planetary Ball Milling
Materials 2013, 6(8), 3361-3372; doi:10.3390/ma6083361
Received: 19 April 2013 / Revised: 20 June 2013 / Accepted: 24 July 2013 / Published: 7 August 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (325 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, a planetary ball milling was used to modify the surface properties of calcite-based material from waste oyster shell under the rotational speed of 200–600 rpm, grinding time of 5–180 min and sample mass of 1–10 g. The milling significantly [...] Read more.
In this work, a planetary ball milling was used to modify the surface properties of calcite-based material from waste oyster shell under the rotational speed of 200–600 rpm, grinding time of 5–180 min and sample mass of 1–10 g. The milling significantly changed the microstructural properties of the calcite-based minerals (i.e., surface area, pore volume, true density, and porosity). The surface characterization of the resulting powder should be macroporous and/or nonporous based on the nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. Under the optimal conditions at the rotational speed of 400 rpm, grinding time of 30 min and sample mass of 5 g, the resulting calcite-based powder had larger specific surface area (i.e., 10.64 m2·g1) than the starting material (i.e., 4.05 m2·g−1). This finding was also consistent with the measurement of laser-diffraction (i.e., 9.7 vs. 15.0 μm of mean diameter). In addition, the results from the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation indicated that surface roughness can be enhanced as particle size decreases as a result of particle-particle attrition. Thus, grinding the aquacultural bioresource by a high-energy ball milling can create the fine materials, which may be applied in the fields of inorganic minerals like aggregate and construction material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerfaces and Materials)
Open AccessArticle In Vitro Activity of Gentamicin-Loaded Bioabsorbable Beads against Different Microorganisms
Materials 2013, 6(8), 3284-3293; doi:10.3390/ma6083284
Received: 31 May 2013 / Revised: 15 July 2013 / Accepted: 26 July 2013 / Published: 5 August 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (259 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Osteomyelitis is responsible for high treatment costs, long hospital stays, and results in substantial morbidity. Treatment with surgical debridement and antibiotic-impregnated Polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) beads is the standard of care, providing high local but low serum antibiotic concentrations, thereby avoiding systemic toxicity. However, [...] Read more.
Osteomyelitis is responsible for high treatment costs, long hospital stays, and results in substantial morbidity. Treatment with surgical debridement and antibiotic-impregnated Polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) beads is the standard of care, providing high local but low serum antibiotic concentrations, thereby avoiding systemic toxicity. However, for several reasons, the beads require surgical removal. Alternative antibiotic delivery systems should improve the treatment of bone infection, actively encourage bone healing and require no additional surgery for removal. We investigated the activity of gentamicin-loaded bioabsorbable beads against different microorganisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans) commonly causing surgical site bone infection, by microcalorimetry. Calcium sulphate beads containing gentamicin were incubated in microcalorimetry ampoules containing different concentrations of the corresponding microorganism. Growth medium with each germ and unloaded beads was used as positive control, growth medium with loaded beads alone as negative control. Bacterial growth-related heat production at 37 °C was measured for 24 h. Cultures without gentamicin-loaded beads produced heat-flow peaks corresponding to the exponential growth of the corresponding microorganisms in nutrient-rich medium. In contrast, cultures with gentamicin-loaded beads completely suppressed heat production during 24 h, demonstrating their antibiotic activity. Gentamicin-loaded beads effectively inhibited growth of susceptible microorganisms, under the described in vitro conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerfaces and Materials)
Open AccessArticle Comparison of Extruded and Sonicated Vesicles for Planar Bilayer Self-Assembly
Materials 2013, 6(8), 3294-3308; doi:10.3390/ma6083294
Received: 17 June 2013 / Revised: 22 July 2013 / Accepted: 24 July 2013 / Published: 5 August 2013
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (474 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Lipid vesicles are an important class of biomaterials that have a wide range of applications, including drug delivery, cosmetic formulations and model membrane platforms on solid supports. Depending on the application, properties of a vesicle population such as size distribution, charge and [...] Read more.
Lipid vesicles are an important class of biomaterials that have a wide range of applications, including drug delivery, cosmetic formulations and model membrane platforms on solid supports. Depending on the application, properties of a vesicle population such as size distribution, charge and permeability need to be optimized. Preparation methods such as mechanical extrusion and sonication play a key role in controlling these properties, and yet the effects of vesicle preparation method on vesicular properties and integrity (e.g., shape, size, distribution and tension) remain incompletely understood. In this study, we prepared vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid by either extrusion or sonication, and investigated the effects on vesicle size distribution over time as well as the concomitant effects on the self-assembly of solid-supported planar lipid bilayers. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to characterize vesicles in solution as well as their interactions with silicon oxide substrates. Collectively, the data support that sonicated vesicles offer more robust control over the self-assembly of homogenous planar lipid bilayers, whereas extruded vesicles are vulnerable to aging and must be used soon after preparation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerfaces and Materials)
Open AccessArticle Bactericidal Activity of Aqueous Acrylic Paint Dispersion for Wooden Substrates Based on TiO2 Nanoparticles Activated by Fluorescent Light
Materials 2013, 6(8), 3270-3283; doi:10.3390/ma6083270
Received: 6 May 2013 / Revised: 14 June 2013 / Accepted: 19 July 2013 / Published: 2 August 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (561 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The photocatalytic effect of TiO2 has great potential for the disinfection of surfaces. Most studies reported in the literature use UV activation of TiO2, while visible light has been used only in a few applications. In these studies, high [...] Read more.
The photocatalytic effect of TiO2 has great potential for the disinfection of surfaces. Most studies reported in the literature use UV activation of TiO2, while visible light has been used only in a few applications. In these studies, high concentrations of TiO2, which can compromise surface properties, have been used. In this work, we have developed an acrylic-water paint dispersion containing low TiO2 content (2 vol %) for the inactivation of microorganisms involved in hospital-acquired infections. The nanoparticles and the coating have been characterized using spectroscopic techniques and transmission electron microscopy, showing their homogenous dispersion in the acrylic urethane coating. A common fluorescent light source was used to activate the photocatalytic activity of TiO2. The paint dispersion showed antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The coating containing the TiO2 nanoparticles maintained good UV stability, strong adhesion to the substrate and high hardness. Therefore, the approach used is feasible for paint formulation aimed at disinfection of healthcare surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerfaces and Materials)
Open AccessArticle Millimeter Wave Radiations Affect Membrane Hydration in Phosphatidylcholine Vesicles
Materials 2013, 6(7), 2701-2712; doi:10.3390/ma6072701
Received: 8 May 2013 / Revised: 20 June 2013 / Accepted: 2 July 2013 / Published: 9 July 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (498 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A clear understanding of the response of biological systems to millimeter waves exposure is of increasing interest for the scientific community due to the recent convincing use of these radiations in the ultrafast wireless communications. Here we report a deuterium nuclear magnetic [...] Read more.
A clear understanding of the response of biological systems to millimeter waves exposure is of increasing interest for the scientific community due to the recent convincing use of these radiations in the ultrafast wireless communications. Here we report a deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2H-NMR) investigation on the effects of millimeter waves in the 53–78 GHz range on phosphocholine bio-mimetic membranes. Millimeter waves significantly affect the polar interface of the membrane causing a decrease of the heavy water quadrupole splitting. This effect is as important as inducing the transition from the fluid to the gel phase when the membrane exposure occurs in the neighborhood of the transition point. On the molecular level, the above effect can be well explained by membrane dehydration induced by the radiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerfaces and Materials)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Materials Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
materials@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Materials
Back to Top