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Special Issue "Bioactive Glasses"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gigliola Lusvardi

Department of Chemical and Geological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via G.Campi 183, 41125 Modena, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials: bioceramics, bioglasses, metallic nanoparticles, drug delivery systems, synthesis (traditional, sol-gel and sono-gel), functional biomaterials, surface functionalization,biosensors, characterization (x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy); materials for energy applications: inorganic photoluminescent pigments, synthesis (traditional) and characterization (x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioactive glasses are a group of surface reactive glass-ceramic biomaterials; bioactive glasses bond to tissue and are biocompatible. They have a wide range of applications due to their versatile properties, which can be properly designed depending on their compositions. A significant improvement in the prevision of glass bioactivity derives from the opportunity to establish relationships between structure and properties by making a combined use of theoretical and experimental techniques. Consequently, bioactive glass science and technology continues to be at the forefront of providing innovative approaches to medicine.

The focus of the “Bioactive Glasses” Special Issue is to provide and comprehend important topics: synthesis, design, development, and applications of bioglasses. Some interesting topics (among others, and certainly not limited to) are: bioderived bioglasses with functionalized nanostructures, encapsulation and adsorption of biomolecules in the surface of bioglasses and interactions with the host matrix, and molecular dynamics simulation applied at atomic level regarding bulk and surface structure of the glasses.

With immense pleasure, we invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue.

Full papers, communications, and reviews are welcome.

Prof Gigliola Lusvardi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive glasses
  • materials science
  • bioactivity
  • metal nanoparticles
  • glass structure
  • surface functionalization
  • drug delivery systems

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Bioactive and Antibacterial Glass Powders Doped with Copper by Ion-Exchange in Aqueous Solutions
Materials 2016, 9(6), 405; doi:10.3390/ma9060405
Received: 31 March 2016 / Revised: 10 May 2016 / Accepted: 18 May 2016 / Published: 24 May 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (11196 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, two bioactive glass powders (SBA2 and SBA3) were doped with Cu by means of the ion-exchange technique in aqueous solution. SBA2 glass was subjected to the ion-exchange process by using different Cu salts (copper(II) nitrate, chloride, acetate, and sulphate) and
[...] Read more.
In this work, two bioactive glass powders (SBA2 and SBA3) were doped with Cu by means of the ion-exchange technique in aqueous solution. SBA2 glass was subjected to the ion-exchange process by using different Cu salts (copper(II) nitrate, chloride, acetate, and sulphate) and concentrations. Structural (X-ray diffraction-XRD), morphological (Scanning Electron Microscopy-SEM), and compositional (Energy Dispersion Spectrometry-EDS) analyses evidenced the formation of crystalline phases for glasses ion-exchanged in copper(II) nitrate and chloride solutions; while the ion-exchange in copper(II) acetate solutions lead to the incorporation of higher Cu amount than the ion-exchange in copper(II) sulphate solutions. For this reason, the antibacterial test (inhibition halo towards S. aureus) was performed on SBA2 powders ion-exchanged in copper(II) acetate solutions and evidenced a limited antibacterial effect. A second glass composition (SBA3) was developed to allow a greater incorporation of Cu in the glass surface; SBA3 powders were ion-exchanged in copper(II) acetate solutions (0.01 M and 0.05 M). Cu-doped SBA3 powders showed an amorphous structure; morphological analysis evidenced a rougher surface for Cu-doped powders in comparison to the undoped glass. EDS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the Cu introduction as Cu(II) ions. Bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that Cu introduction did not alter the bioactive behaviour of the glass. Finally, inhibition halo test towards S. aureus evidenced a good antimicrobial effect for glass powders ion-exchanged in copper(II) acetate solutions 0.05 M. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses)
Open AccessArticle SiO2-CaO-P2O5 Bioactive Glasses: A Promising Curcuminoids Delivery System
Materials 2016, 9(4), 290; doi:10.3390/ma9040290
Received: 22 March 2016 / Revised: 8 April 2016 / Accepted: 11 April 2016 / Published: 15 April 2016
PDF Full-text (2855 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we report the study of the loading and the release of curcuminoids by bioactive glasses (BG) and mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBG). Through a detailed spectroscopic study, it was possible to determine the amount and the type of molecules released in
[...] Read more.
In this paper, we report the study of the loading and the release of curcuminoids by bioactive glasses (BG) and mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBG). Through a detailed spectroscopic study, it was possible to determine the amount and the type of molecules released in water and in simulated body fluid (SBF). In particular, curcumin and K2T21 show a good ability to be released in di-keto and keto-enolic form, depending from the pH. However, after 24 h, the amount of pristine curcumin release is very low with a consequent increment of degradation products derived by curcuminoids. The presence of –OH groups on curcuminoids is a fundamental pre-requisite in order to obtain a high loading and release in polar solution such as water and SBF. The substrate on which we loaded the drugs does not seem to affect significantly the loading and the release of the drugs. The environment, instead, affects the release: for all the drugs, the release in SBF, buffered at pH of 7.4, is slightly worse than the release in water (basic pH values). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses)
Figures

Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication Synthesis of Monodispersed Ag-Doped Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles via Surface Modification
Materials 2016, 9(4), 225; doi:10.3390/ma9040225
Received: 6 February 2016 / Revised: 15 March 2016 / Accepted: 15 March 2016 / Published: 24 March 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1503 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Monodispersed spherical Ag-doped bioactive glass nanoparticles (Ag-BGNs) were synthesized by a modified Stöber method combined with surface modification. The surface modification was carried out at 25, 60, and 80 °C, respectively, to investigate the influence of processing temperature on particle properties. Energy-dispersive X-ray
[...] Read more.
Monodispersed spherical Ag-doped bioactive glass nanoparticles (Ag-BGNs) were synthesized by a modified Stöber method combined with surface modification. The surface modification was carried out at 25, 60, and 80 °C, respectively, to investigate the influence of processing temperature on particle properties. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results indicated that higher temperatures facilitate the incorporation of Ag. Hydroxyapatite (HA) formation on Ag-BGNs was detected upon immersion of the particles in simulated body fluid for 7 days, which indicated that Ag-BGNs maintained high bioactivity after surface modification. The conducted antibacterial assay confirmed that Ag-BGNs had an antibacterial effect on E. coli. The above results thereby suggest that surface modification is an effective way to incorporate Ag into BGNs and that the modified BGNs can remain monodispersed as well as exhibit bioactivity and antibacterial capability for biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Bioactive Glasses with Low Ca/P Ratio and Enhanced Bioactivity
Materials 2016, 9(4), 226; doi:10.3390/ma9040226
Received: 8 February 2016 / Revised: 11 March 2016 / Accepted: 16 March 2016 / Published: 24 March 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4765 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Three new silica-based glass formulations with low molar Ca/P ratio (2–3) have been synthesized. The thermal properties, the crystalline phases induced by thermal treatments and the sintering ability of each glass formulation have been investigated by simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetric analysis (DSC-TG), X-ray
[...] Read more.
Three new silica-based glass formulations with low molar Ca/P ratio (2–3) have been synthesized. The thermal properties, the crystalline phases induced by thermal treatments and the sintering ability of each glass formulation have been investigated by simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetric analysis (DSC-TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hot stage microscopy (HSM). The glasses exhibited a good sintering behavior, with two samples achieving shrinkage of 85%–95% prior to crystallization. The bioactivity of the glasses in simulated body fluid (SBF) has been investigated by performing XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) on the samples prior and after immersion. The glasses with lower MgO contents were able to form a fully crystallized apatite layer after three days of immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF), while for the glass exhibiting a higher MgO content in its composition, the crystallization of the Ca–P layer was achieved after seven days. The conjugation of these properties opens new insights on the synthesis of highly bioactive and mechanically strong prosthetic materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Alendronate Functionalized Mesoporous Bioactive Glass Nanospheres
Materials 2016, 9(3), 135; doi:10.3390/ma9030135
Received: 21 December 2015 / Revised: 11 February 2016 / Accepted: 18 February 2016 / Published: 26 February 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1971 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work we synthesized mesoporous bioactive glass nanospheres (nMBG) with the aim to utilize them as substrates for loading one of the most potent amino-bisphosphonates, alendronate (AL). The results of the chemical and structural characterization show that the nMBG display a relatively
[...] Read more.
In this work we synthesized mesoporous bioactive glass nanospheres (nMBG) with the aim to utilize them as substrates for loading one of the most potent amino-bisphosphonates, alendronate (AL). The results of the chemical and structural characterization show that the nMBG display a relatively high surface area (528 m2/g) and a mean pore volume of 0.63 cm3/g, both of which decrease on increasing alendronate content. It is possible to modulate the amount of AL loaded into the nanospheres up to a maximum value of about 17 wt %. In vitro tests were performed using a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG63) and a murine monocyte/macrophage cell line as osteoclast model (RAW 264.7). The results indicate that even the lower concentration of alendronate provokes decreased tumor cell viability, and that osteoclast activity exhibits an alendronate dose-dependent inhibition. The data suggest that nMBG can act as a suitable support for the local delivery of alendronate, and that the antiresorptive and antitumor properties of the functionalized mesoporous nanospheres can be modulated by varying the amount of alendronate loading. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses)
Open AccessArticle The Correlation of Surfactant Concentrations on the Properties of Mesoporous Bioactive Glass
Materials 2016, 9(1), 58; doi:10.3390/ma9010058
Received: 22 October 2015 / Revised: 30 December 2015 / Accepted: 12 January 2016 / Published: 19 January 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1664 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bioactive glass (BG), a potential biomaterial, has received increasing attention since the discovery of its superior bioactivity. One of the main research objectives is to improve the bioactive property of BGs; therefore, surfactant-derived mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) were developed to provide a high
[...] Read more.
Bioactive glass (BG), a potential biomaterial, has received increasing attention since the discovery of its superior bioactivity. One of the main research objectives is to improve the bioactive property of BGs; therefore, surfactant-derived mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) were developed to provide a high specific surface area for achieving higher bioactivity. In this study, various concentrations of typical triblock F127 surfactant were used to manipulate the morphology, specific surface area, and bioactivity of MBG particles. Two typical morphologies of smooth (Type I) and wrinkled (Type II) spheres were observed, and the population of Type II particles increased with an increase in the surfactant concentration. A direct correlation between specific surface area and bioactivity was observed by comparing the data obtained using the nitrogen adsorption-desorption method and in vitro bioactive tests. Furthermore, the optimal surfactant concentration corresponding to the highest bioactivity revealed that the surfactant aggregated to form Type II particles when the surface concentration was higher than the critical micelle concentration, and the high population of Type II particles may reduce the specific surface area because of the loss of bioactivity. Moreover, the formation mechanism of SP-derived MBG particles is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles: From Synthesis to Materials Design for Biomedical Applications
Materials 2016, 9(4), 288; doi:10.3390/ma9040288
Received: 9 March 2016 / Revised: 8 April 2016 / Accepted: 11 April 2016 / Published: 14 April 2016
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (1760 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Thanks to their high biocompatibility and bioactivity, bioactive glasses are very promising materials for soft and hard tissue repair and engineering. Because bioactivity and specific surface area intrinsically linked, the last decade has seen a focus on the development of highly porous and/or
[...] Read more.
Thanks to their high biocompatibility and bioactivity, bioactive glasses are very promising materials for soft and hard tissue repair and engineering. Because bioactivity and specific surface area intrinsically linked, the last decade has seen a focus on the development of highly porous and/or nano-sized materials. This review emphasizes the synthesis of bioactive glass nanoparticles and materials design strategies. The first part comprehensively covers mainly soft chemistry processes, which aim to obtain dispersible and monodispersed nanoparticles. The second part discusses the use of bioactive glass nanoparticles for medical applications, highlighting the design of materials. Mesoporous nanoparticles for drug delivery, injectable systems and scaffolds consisting of bioactive glass nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer, implant coatings and particle dispersions will be presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses)

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