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Special Issue "Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Carlos Lodeiro

BIOSCOPE research group, LAQV-REQUIMTE, Chemistry Department, FCT-University NOVA of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
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Interests: fluorescent chemosensors; colorimetric probes; nanoparticles; nanoproteomics; nanocomposites; smart materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jose Luis Capelo

BIOSCOPE research group, LAQV-REQUIMTE, Chemistry Department, FCT-University NOVA of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
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Interests: proteomics; phosphoproteomics; biomarker discovery; fluorescent chemosensors; colorimetric devices; environmental studies
Guest Editor
Dr. Javier Fernandez Lodeiro

BIOSCOPE research group, LAQV-REQUIMTE, Chemistry Department, FCT-University NOVA of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
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Interests: fuorescent nanosensors; colorimetric probes; metallic nanoparticles; functional nano-materials
Guest Editor
Dr. Elisabete Oliveira

Chemistry Department, REQUIMTE, FCT-University NOVA of Lisbon
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mesoporous nanoparticles; nanoparticles; quantum dots; cancer research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are proud to announce this Special Issue, “Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research”, in Materials (MDPI Editorial; IF: 2.654) devoted to the 3rd International Symposium on Nanoparticles, Nanomaterials and Applications (3rdISN2A-2018). (http://www.isn2a2018.com/)

The conference will be held in Costa de Caparica, Portugal, 22–25 January, 2018. This Special Issue will select excellent papers from the oral (plenary, keynotes, and regular talks) and posters participations, and covers a very wide range of fields in materials and nanomaterials applied in translational research, focusing in environmental, toxicological, and bio-medical applications. We invite investigators to contribute original research articles, as well as review articles, to this Special Issue.

Prof. Carlos Lodeiro
Prof. Jose Luis Capelo
Dr. Javier Fernandez Lodeiro
Dr. Elisabete Oliveira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Electrical Conductivity and Optical Properties of Pulsed Laser Deposited LaNi5 Nanoscale Films
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1475; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081475
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 19 August 2018
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Abstract
This work presents pulsed laser deposition as a method to obtain unoxidized LaNi5 nanoscale films and describes their temperature and thickness dependent electrical conductivity and the spectral dispersions of some optical properties. AB5-type rare earth element (REE)-nickel compounds are currently
[...] Read more.
This work presents pulsed laser deposition as a method to obtain unoxidized LaNi5 nanoscale films and describes their temperature and thickness dependent electrical conductivity and the spectral dispersions of some optical properties. AB5-type rare earth element (REE)-nickel compounds are currently studied from both theoretical and practical points of view. Special challenges are posed during the preparation of these nanomaterials, which can be overcome using finely tuned parameters in a preparation process that always involves the use of high energies. Film deposition was made by laser—induced vaporization, with short and modulated impulses and electro–optical tuning of the quality factor, mainly on glass and one SiO2 substrate. Deposition geometry dependent linear thickness increase, between 1.5–2.5 nm per laser burst, was achieved. Film structures and phase compositions were determined using XRD and discussed in comparison with films obtained by similar deposition procedures. Temperature and scale dependent properties were determined by studying electrical conductivity and optical properties. Electrical conductivity was measured using the four-probe method. The observed semiconductor-like conductivity for film thicknesses up to 110 nm can be explained by thermal activation of electrons followed by inter-insular hopping or quantum tunneling, which, on the other hand, modulates the material’s native metallic conductance. Films with thicknesses above this value can be considered essentially metallic and bulk-like. The spectral behaviors of the refractive index and absorption coefficient were deduced from differential reflectance spectroscopy data acquired on a broad ultraviolet, visible, near- and mid-infrared (UV-VIS-NIR-MIR) domain, processed using the Kramers-Krönig formalism. Their study led to the identification of the allowed interband transitions. Electronic behavior in the energy bands near the Fermi level and in the surface and interface-states was described, discussing the differences between experimental data and the classical free-electron theoretical model applied for the bulk intermetallic alloy, in correlation with theoretical optical properties or experimental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results from references. However, the dielectric-like shape of the reflectance of the thinnest film was in accordance with the Lorentz–Drude model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research)
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Open AccessArticle Synthesis of Gold Functionalised Nanoparticles with the Eranthis hyemalis Lectin and Preliminary Toxicological Studies on Caenorhabditis elegans
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1363; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081363
Received: 14 July 2018 / Revised: 31 July 2018 / Accepted: 2 August 2018 / Published: 6 August 2018
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Abstract
The lectin found in the tubers of the Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) plant (EHL) is a Type II Ribosome Inactivating Protein (RIP). Type II RIPs have shown anti-cancer properties and have great potential as therapeutic agents. Similarly, colloidal gold nanoparticles are
[...] Read more.
The lectin found in the tubers of the Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) plant (EHL) is a Type II Ribosome Inactivating Protein (RIP). Type II RIPs have shown anti-cancer properties and have great potential as therapeutic agents. Similarly, colloidal gold nanoparticles are successfully used in biomedical applications as they can be functionalised with ligands with high affinity and specificity for target cells to create therapeutic and imaging agents. Here we present the synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles conjugated with EHL and the results of a set of initial assays to establish whether the biological effect of EHL is altered by the conjugation. Gold nanoparticles functionalised with EHL (AuNPs@EHL) were successfully synthesised by bioconjugation with citrate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs@Citrate). The conjugates were analysed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Zeta Potential analysis, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results indicate that an optimal functionalisation was achieved with the addition of 100 µL of EHL (concentration 1090 ± 40 µg/mL) over 5 mL of AuNPs (concentration [Au0] = 0.8 mM). Biological assays on the effect of AuNPs@EHL were undertaken on Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living nematode commonly used for toxicological studies, that has previously been shown to be strongly affected by EHL. Citrate gold nanoparticles did not have any obvious effect on the nematodes. For first larval stage (L1) nematodes, AuNPs@EHL showed a lower biological effect than EHL. For L4 stage, pre-adult nematodes, both EHL alone and AuNPs@EHL delayed the onset of reproduction and reduced fecundity. These assays indicate that EHL can be conjugated to gold nanoparticles and retain elements of biocidal activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Annealing Temperature on ECD Grown Hexagonal-Plane Zinc Oxide
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1360; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081360
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 27 July 2018 / Accepted: 31 July 2018 / Published: 6 August 2018
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Abstract
Zinc oxide (ZnO) offers a great potential in several applications from sensors to Photovoltaic cells thanks to the material’s dependency, to its optical and electrical properties and crystalline structure architypes. Typically, ZnO powder tends to be grown in the form of a wurtzite
[...] Read more.
Zinc oxide (ZnO) offers a great potential in several applications from sensors to Photovoltaic cells thanks to the material’s dependency, to its optical and electrical properties and crystalline structure architypes. Typically, ZnO powder tends to be grown in the form of a wurtzite structure allowing versatility in the phase of material growths; albeit, whereas in this work we introduce an alternative in scalable yet relatively simple 2D hexagonal planed ZnO nanoflakes via the electrochemical deposition of commercially purchased Zn(NO3)2 and KCl salts in an electrochemical process. The resulting grown materials were analyzed and characterized via a series of techniques prior to thermal annealing to increase the grain size and improve the crystal quality. Through observation via scanning electron microscope (SEM) images, we have analyzed the statistics of the grown flakes’ hexagonal plane’s size showing a non-monotonal strong dependency of the average flake’s hexagonal flakes’ on the annealing temperature, whereas at 300 °C annealing temperature, average flake size was found to be in the order of 300 μm2. The flakes were further analyzed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to confirm its hexagonal planes and spectroscopy techniques, such as Raman Spectroscopy and photo luminescence were applied to analyze and confirm the ZnO crystal signatures. The grown materials also underwent further characterization to gain insights on the material, electrical, and optical properties and, hence, verify the quality of the material for Photovoltaic cells’ electron collection layer application. The role of KCl in aiding the growth of the less preferable (0001) ZnO is also investigated via various prospects discussed in our work. Our method offers a relatively simple and mass-producible method for synthesizing a high quality 2D form of ZnO that is, otherwise, technically difficult to grow or control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research)
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Open AccessArticle Toxicological Evaluation of Luminescent Silica Nanoparticles as New Drug Nanocarriers in Different Cancer Cell Lines
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1310; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081310
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 25 July 2018 / Accepted: 25 July 2018 / Published: 28 July 2018
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Abstract
Luminescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles, CdTeQDs@MNs@PEG1, SiQDs@Isoc@MNs and SiQDs@Isoc@MNs@PEG2, were successfully synthetized and characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, N2 nitrogen isotherms, 1H NMR, IR, absorption, and emission spectroscopy. Cytotoxic evaluation of these nanoparticles was performed in relevant in vitro cell models, such
[...] Read more.
Luminescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles, CdTeQDs@MNs@PEG1, SiQDs@Isoc@MNs and SiQDs@Isoc@MNs@PEG2, were successfully synthetized and characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, N2 nitrogen isotherms, 1H NMR, IR, absorption, and emission spectroscopy. Cytotoxic evaluation of these nanoparticles was performed in relevant in vitro cell models, such as human hepatoma HepG2, human brain endothelial (hCMEC/D3), and human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cell lines. None of the tested nanoparticles showed significant cytotoxicity in any of the three performed assays (MTT/NR/ LDH) compared with the respective solvent and/or coating controls, excepting for CdTeQDs@MNs@PEG1 nanoparticles, where significant toxicity was noticed in hCMEC/D3 cells. The results presented reveal that SiQDs-based mesoporous silica nanoparticles are promising nanoplatforms for cancer treatment, with a pH-responsive drug release profile and the ability to load 80% of doxorubicin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Prolonged Silver Nanoparticle Exposure on the Contextual Cognition and Behavior of Mammals
Materials 2018, 11(4), 558; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11040558
Received: 19 March 2018 / Revised: 31 March 2018 / Accepted: 3 April 2018 / Published: 5 April 2018
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Abstract
Silver nanoparticles have been widely used in the lighting and food industries, in medicine, and in pharmaceutics as an antiseptic agent. Recent research demonstrates that, after prolonged oral administration, silver nanoparticles may cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the brain in rather
[...] Read more.
Silver nanoparticles have been widely used in the lighting and food industries, in medicine, and in pharmaceutics as an antiseptic agent. Recent research demonstrates that, after prolonged oral administration, silver nanoparticles may cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the brain in rather high amounts. In ex vivo experiments, it has also been shown that silver nanoparticles demonstrate neurotoxicity. The objective of this work was to answer the questions whether silver nanoparticles change cognitive and behavioral functions of mammals after prolonged administration if silver nanoparticles have accumulated in the brain. C57Bl/6 male mice were orally exposed to PVP-coated silver nanoparticles daily for 30, 60, 120 and 180 days. Control mice were exposed to distilled water. After that they were tested in the Open Field, Elevated Plus Maze, Light-Dark Box and contextual fear conditioning task. The data have shown that the experimental mice went through three periods of switching in the behavior caused by adaptation to the toxic silver nanoparticles: anxiety, appearance of research instinct and impairment of long-term memory. This provides evidence of the hazardous effect of silver nanoparticles, which appears after long periods of silver nanoparticle oral administration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research)
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Open AccessArticle New Pyrazolium Salts as a Support for Ionic Liquid Crystals and Ionic Conductors
Materials 2018, 11(4), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11040548
Received: 20 February 2018 / Revised: 21 March 2018 / Accepted: 28 March 2018 / Published: 3 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (40813 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) are a class of materials that combine the properties of liquid crystals (LCs) and ionic liquids (ILs). This type of materials is directed towards properties such as conductivity in ordered systems at different temperatures. In this work, we synthesize
[...] Read more.
Ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) are a class of materials that combine the properties of liquid crystals (LCs) and ionic liquids (ILs). This type of materials is directed towards properties such as conductivity in ordered systems at different temperatures. In this work, we synthesize five new families of ILCs containing symmetrical and unsymmetrical substituted pyrazolium cations, with different alkyl long-chains, and anions such as Cl, BF4, ReO4, p-CH3-6H4SO3 (PTS) and CF3SO3 (OTf). We study their thermal behavior by polarized light optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). All of them, except those with OTf as counteranion, show thermotropic mesomorphism. The observations by POM reveal textures of lamellar mesophases. Those agree with the arrangement observed in the X-ray crystal structure of [H2pzR(4),R(4)][ReO4]. The nature of the mesophases is also confirmed by variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction. On the other hand, the study of the dielectric properties at variable temperature in mesomorphic (Cl and BF4) and non-mesomorphic (OTf) salts indicates that the supramolecular arrangement of the mesophase favors a greater ionic mobility and therefore ionic conductivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research)
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Open AccessArticle Application of Silver Nanostructures Synthesized by Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Inactivation of Bacterial Phytopathogens from the Genera Dickeya and Pectobacterium
Materials 2018, 11(3), 331; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11030331
Received: 11 January 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 16 February 2018 / Published: 25 February 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3640 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pectinolytic bacteria are responsible for significant economic losses by causing diseases on numerous plants. New methods are required to control and limit their spread. One possibility is the application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) that exhibit well-established antibacterial properties. Here, we synthesized AgNPs, stabilized
[...] Read more.
Pectinolytic bacteria are responsible for significant economic losses by causing diseases on numerous plants. New methods are required to control and limit their spread. One possibility is the application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) that exhibit well-established antibacterial properties. Here, we synthesized AgNPs, stabilized by pectins (PEC) or sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), using a direct current atmospheric pressure glow discharge (dc-APGD) generated in an open-to-air and continuous-flow reaction-discharge system. Characterization of the PEC-AgNPs and SDS-AgNPs with UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction revealed the production of spherical, well dispersed, and face cubic centered crystalline AgNPs, with average sizes of 9.33 ± 3.37 nm and 28.3 ± 11.7 nm, respectively. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy supported the functionalization of the nanostructures by PEC and SDS. Antibacterial activity of the AgNPs was tested against Dickeya spp. and Pectobacterium spp. strains. Both PEC-AgNPs and SDS-AgNPs displayed bactericidal activity against all of the tested isolates, with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 5.5 mg∙L−1 and 0.75–3 mg∙L−1, respectively. The collected results suggest that the dc-APGD reaction-discharge system can be applied for the production of defined AgNPs with strong antibacterial properties, which may be further applied in plant disease management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Materials for Translational Research)
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