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Special Issue "Marine Anti-inflammatory Agents"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Elena Talero

Pharmacology, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: peptides; natural products; inflammation; inflammatory bowel disease; colon cancer; inflammatory skin diseases
Guest Editor
Dr. Javier Avila

Pharmacology, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microalgae; inflammation; oxylipins; inflammatory bowel disease; colon cancer; inflammatory skin diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Acute inflammation is a highly-regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the development of a chronic inflammatory state, which is believed to play a main role in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. The molecular mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation are beginning to be elucidated: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulate intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors, including MAPK and NF-kB. ROS can also activate a multiprotein complex called inflammasome, which regulates the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent maturation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-18). The transcription factor Nrf2 plays a key role in the protection against oxidative stress in numerous inflammatory diseases since it regulates the transcription of antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, the participation of sirtuins, such as SIRT1 and SIRT6 and autophagy in this process is currently being studied.

In recent years, the need to find new anti-inflammatory molecules has raised the scientific community´s interest for marine natural products. In this regard, the marine environment represents an excellent source to isolate bioactive compounds from microbes, such as bacteria, cyanobacteria, fungi, algae or small invertebrates, such as sponges, tunicates, bryozoans and mollusks. This Special Issue of Marine Drugs will cover the entire scope of marine agents with anti-inflammatory activities, both in vitro and in vivo, as well as the latest status of clinical development from drug trials. In particular, works that evaluate molecular mechanisms of these compounds are especially encouraged.

Prof.  Elena Talero
Dr. Javier Avila
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine compounds
  • Antioxidant molecules
  • Inflammation
  • Immune response
  • Sirtuins
  • Autophagy
  • Inflammasome
  • Cytokines

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Zoanthamine Alkaloids from the Zoantharian Zoanthus cf. pulchellus and Their Effects in Neuroinflammation
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(7), 242; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16070242
Received: 1 July 2018 / Revised: 15 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
Two new zoanthamine alkaloids, namely 3-acetoxynorzoanthamine (1) and 3-acetoxyzoanthamine (2), have been isolated from the zoantharian Zoanthus cf. pulchellus collected off the coast of the Santa Elena Peninsula, Ecuador, together with three known derivatives: zoanthamine, norzoanthamine, and 3-hydroxynorzoanthamine. The
[...] Read more.
Two new zoanthamine alkaloids, namely 3-acetoxynorzoanthamine (1) and 3-acetoxyzoanthamine (2), have been isolated from the zoantharian Zoanthus cf. pulchellus collected off the coast of the Santa Elena Peninsula, Ecuador, together with three known derivatives: zoanthamine, norzoanthamine, and 3-hydroxynorzoanthamine. The chemical structures of 1 and 2 were determined by interpretation of their 1D and 2D NMR data and comparison with literature data. This is the first report of zoanthamine-type alkaloids from Zoanthus cf. pulchellus collected in the Tropical Eastern Pacific. The neuroinflammatory activity of all the isolated compounds was evaluated in microglia BV-2 cells and high inhibitory effects were observed in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Anti-inflammatory Agents)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Frondanol, a Nutraceutical Extract from Cucumaria frondosa, Attenuates Colonic Inflammation in a DSS-Induced Colitis Model in Mice
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050148
Received: 18 March 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 27 April 2018 / Published: 30 April 2018
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Abstract
Frondanol is a nutraceutical lipid extract of the intestine of the edible Atlantic sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, with potent anti-inflammatory effects. In the current study, we investigated Frondanol as a putative anti-inflammatory compound in an experimental model of colonic inflammation. C57BL/6J male black
[...] Read more.
Frondanol is a nutraceutical lipid extract of the intestine of the edible Atlantic sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, with potent anti-inflammatory effects. In the current study, we investigated Frondanol as a putative anti-inflammatory compound in an experimental model of colonic inflammation. C57BL/6J male black mice (C57BL/6J) were given 3% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days to induce colitis. The colitis group received oral Frondanol (100 mg/kg body weight/per day by gavage) and were compared with a control group and the DSS group. Disease activity index (DAI) and colon histology were scored for macroscopic and microscopic changes. Colonic tissue length, myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration, neutrophil and macrophage marker mRNA, pro-inflammatory cytokine proteins, and their respective mRNAs were measured using ELISA and real-time RT-PCR. The tissue content of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was also measured using ELISA. Frondanol significantly decreased the DAI and reduced the inflammation-associated changes in colon length as well as macroscopic and microscopic architecture of the colon. Changes in tissue MPO concentrations, neutrophil and macrophage mRNA expression (F4/80 and MIP-2), and pro-inflammatory cytokine content (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) both at the protein and mRNA level were significantly reduced by Frondanol. The increase in content of the pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene B4 (LTB4) induced by DSS was also significantly inhibited by Frondanol. It was thus found that Frondanol supplementation attenuates colon inflammation through its potent anti-inflammatory activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Anti-inflammatory Agents)
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Open AccessArticle Topical Application of Glycolipids from Isochrysis galbana Prevents Epidermal Hyperplasia in Mice
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16010002
Received: 25 November 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 7 December 2017 / Published: 25 December 2017
PDF Full-text (4508 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis have a significant impact on society. Currently, the major topical treatments have many side effects, making their continued use in patients difficult. Microalgae have emerged as a source of bio-active molecules such as glycolipids with potent
[...] Read more.
Chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis have a significant impact on society. Currently, the major topical treatments have many side effects, making their continued use in patients difficult. Microalgae have emerged as a source of bio-active molecules such as glycolipids with potent anti-inflammatory properties. We aimed to investigate the effects of a glycolipid (MGMG-A) and a glycolipid fraction (MGDG) obtained from the microalga Isochrysis galbana on a TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia murine model. In a first set of experiments, we examined the preventive effects of MGMG-A and MGDG dissolved in acetone on TPA-induced hyperplasia model in mice. In a second step, we performed an in vivo permeability study by using rhodamine-containing cream, ointment, or gel to determinate the formulation that preserves the skin architecture and reaches deeper. The selected formulation was assayed to ensure the stability and enhanced permeation properties of the samples in an ex vivo experiment. Finally, MGDG-containing cream was assessed in the hyperplasia murine model. The results showed that pre-treatment with acetone-dissolved glycolipids reduced skin edema, epidermal thickness, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17) in epidermal tissue. The in vivo and ex vivo permeation studies showed that the cream formulation had the best permeability profile. In the same way, MGDG-cream formulation showed better permeation than acetone-dissolved preparation. MGDG-cream application attenuated TPA-induced skin edema, improved histopathological features, and showed a reduction of the inflammatory cell infiltrate. In addition, this formulation inhibited epidermal expression of COX-2 in a similar way to dexamethasone. Our results suggest that an MGDG-containing cream could be an emerging therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammatory skin pathologies such as psoriasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Anti-inflammatory Agents)
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Open AccessArticle Anti-Inflammatory Effects of a Mytilus coruscus α-d-Glucan (MP-A) in Activated Macrophage Cells via TLR4/NF-κB/MAPK Pathway Inhibition
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(9), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15090294
Received: 25 July 2017 / Revised: 3 September 2017 / Accepted: 15 September 2017 / Published: 20 September 2017
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Abstract
The hard-shelled mussel (Mytilus coruscus) has been used as Chinese traditional medicine for thousands of years; however, to date the ingredients responsible for the various beneficial health outcomes attributed to Mytilus coruscus are still unclear. An α-d-Glucan, called MP-A,
[...] Read more.
The hard-shelled mussel (Mytilus coruscus) has been used as Chinese traditional medicine for thousands of years; however, to date the ingredients responsible for the various beneficial health outcomes attributed to Mytilus coruscus are still unclear. An α-d-Glucan, called MP-A, was isolated from Mytilus coruscus, and observed to exert anti-inflammatory activity in THP-1 human macrophage cells. Specifically, we showed that MP-A treatment inhibited the production of inflammatory markers, including TNF-α, NO, and PGE2, inducible NOS (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in LPS-activated THP-1 cells. It was also shown to enhance phagocytosis in the analyzed cells, but to severely inhibit the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB P65. Finally, MP-A was found to exhibit a high binding affinity for the cell surface receptor TLR4, but a low affinity for TLR2 and dectin-1, via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. The study indicates that MP-A suppresses LPS-induced TNF-α, NO and PEG2 production via TLR4/NF-κB/MAPK pathway inhibition, and suggests that MP-A may be a promising therapeutic candidate for diseases associated with TNF-α, NO, and/or PEG2 overproduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Anti-inflammatory Agents)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Review
Title: Prostaglandins as anti-inflammatory molecules produced in marine environment
Authors: Federica Di Costanzo, Valeria Di Dato, Giovanna Romano
Abstract:

Marine environment is a great source of bioactive compounds that are mainly accumulated in marine organisms. Due to the high biodiversity, research into the use of natural marine products as pharmaceutical agents is still at the beginning and many promising molecules are being studied (1). One example of this molecules are prostaglandins (PGs), a family of lipids mediators, belonging to eicosanoids, with a molecular structure of 20 carbon atoms based on the skeleton of prostanoic acid (2). PGs are typicall of mammals in which they are active in a great variety of physiological and pathological processes. For example, they play a key role in smooth muscle and vaso-tone, inflammation, signalling, haemostasis, and sleep-wake regulation (4). These important molecules are present also in some macroalgae of the genera Gracilaria and Laminaria (3) and in marine invertebrates such as corals, barnacles and tunicates, in which it is reported that they perform roles similar to mammals PGs and are involved also in the control of oogenesis and spermatogenesis, ion transport and defence (4). Recently the PGs pathway has been identified for the first time in unicellular organisms called diatoms. In particular, it has been discovered that in two different strains of the diatom Skeletonema marinoi, the genes of this pathway are differentially expressed (3). In this review we will discuss about the variety of marine organisms that produce prostaglandins and the possible anti-inflammatory role of these molecules in the marine environment.

(1) Biomedical Compounds from Marine organisms
Rajeev Kumar Jha, and Xu Zi-rong
(2) Introduction to the biosynthesis and metabolism of prostaglandins
PRISCILLA J. PIPER
(3) Animal-like prostaglandins in marine microalgae
Valeria Di Dato, Ida Orefice, Alberto Amato, Carolina Fontanarosa, Angela Amoresano, Adele Cutignano, Adrianna Ianora and Giovanna Romano
(4) Prostaglandins in non-insectan invertebrates: recent insights and unsolved problems
Andrew F. Rowley, Claire L. Vogan, Graham W. Taylor and Anthony S. Clare
(5) The Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Prostaglandins
Scher JU, Pillinger MH

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