Topical Collection "Bioactive Compounds from Marine Plankton"

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A topical collection in Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Editor

Collection Editor
Prof. Dr. Georg Pohnert

Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Lessingstr. 8, D-07743 Jena, Germany
Website: http://www.chemgeo.uni-jena.de/Pohnertgroup.html
Fax: +49 3641 948172
Interests: marine chemical ecology; analytical chemistry; biosynthesis; oxylipins; lipids; terpenoids; phytoplankton

Topical Collection Information

Dear Collegues,

The inhabitants of the open water are under the influence of gradual changes in nutrients, light, temperature, mechanical cues. But only chemical signals have the potential to provide important directional information about conspecific, predatory or competing species. Hence, a very interesting chemistry has developed that has the power to shape the ecosystem. But these interesting metabolic tasks also resulted in the evolution of metabolites with interesting pharmacological activity. Bioactive metabolites include for example dissolved gases, lipids, oxylipins, polyketides, peptides, and proteins that demonstrate a surprising structural and functional complexity. In this collection we want to explore all topics in natural product chemistry of marine plankton and to illustrate current methodological and conceptual challenges in plankton research. Especially the complex interplay of toxins, nutrients and infochemicals shaping the marine plankton is of interest, but also the pharmacological activity, biosynthesis and genetics of the multitude of interesting metabolites will be covered in this collection.
Recent progress reveals an emerging field that calls for special attention and I therefore invite you to contribute your exciting work to the collection on “Marine Plankton” of Marine Drugs.

Prof. Dr. Georg Pohnert
Collection Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • marine plankton
  • phytoplankton
  • zooplankton
  • microbial loop
  • bioactive natural products
  • chemical ecology
  • chemical interactions
  • metabolites
  • lipids
  • oxylipins
  • red tides
  • polyketides
  • toxins

Published Papers (11 papers)

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2016  ( 1 paper )


2013  ( 10 papers )


2016
by , , , , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(7), 125; doi:10.3390/md14070125
Received: 30 April 2016 / Revised: 18 June 2016 / Accepted: 29 June 2016 / Published: 8 July 2016
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2013
by , , , , , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(11), 4594-4611; doi:10.3390/md11114594
Received: 10 July 2013 / Revised: 6 September 2013 / Accepted: 9 October 2013 / Published: 14 November 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (892 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text

by , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(11), 4158-4175; doi:10.3390/md11114158
Received: 12 August 2013 / Revised: 13 September 2013 / Accepted: 1 October 2013 / Published: 29 October 2013
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by , , , , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(9), 3425-3471; doi:10.3390/md11093425
Received: 15 May 2013 / Revised: 2 July 2013 / Accepted: 24 July 2013 / Published: 9 September 2013
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by , , , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(7), 2667-2681; doi:10.3390/md11072667
Received: 23 April 2013 / Revised: 7 June 2013 / Accepted: 8 July 2013 / Published: 23 July 2013
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by , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(7), 2486-2500; doi:10.3390/md11072486
Received: 11 April 2013 / Revised: 17 June 2013 / Accepted: 28 June 2013 / Published: 15 July 2013
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by  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(7), 2459-2471; doi:10.3390/md11072459
Received: 9 April 2013 / Revised: 6 June 2013 / Accepted: 17 June 2013 / Published: 12 July 2013
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by ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(7), 2398-2412; doi:10.3390/md11072398
Received: 17 May 2013 / Revised: 19 June 2013 / Accepted: 28 June 2013 / Published: 11 July 2013
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by , , , , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(7), 2259-2281; doi:10.3390/md11072259
Received: 16 April 2013 / Revised: 16 May 2013 / Accepted: 21 May 2013 / Published: 27 June 2013
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by , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(5), 1728-1762; doi:10.3390/md11051728
Received: 28 March 2013 / Revised: 24 April 2013 / Accepted: 25 April 2013 / Published: 22 May 2013
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by , , , , , , ,  and
Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(1), 67-80; doi:10.3390/md11010067
Received: 22 September 2012 / Revised: 2 November 2012 / Accepted: 12 December 2012 / Published: 9 January 2013
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Chytrids infecting marine planktonic diatoms—Part 1: The role of chemotactic triggers in parasite-host recognition
Authors: Bettina Scholz 1,2, Frithjof Küpper 3, Wim Vyverman 4 and Ulf Karsten 5
Affiliations: 1 BioPol ehf., Einbúastig 2, 545 Skagaströnd, Iceland; 2 Faculty of Natural Resource Sciences, University of Akureyri, Borgir v. Nordurslod, IS 600 Akureyri, Iceland; 3 Oceanlab, University of Aberdeen, Main Street, Newburgh AB41 6AA, Scotland, United Kingdom; 4 Department of Biology, Section of Protistology and Aquatic Ecology, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000 Ghent, Belgium; 5 Institute of Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology & Phycology, University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 3, 18059 Rostock, Germany
Abstract: All living organisms are subject to an almost permanent onslaught of parasitic organisms. Nevertheless, there is very little knowledge about such diseases in marine microalgae, and particularly about the presence and nature of chemical cues in parasite-host interactions. Thus, overall four host-parasite tandem cultures were used to test the chemotaxis of chytrid zoospores, utilizing Hellendahl staining jars divided in two compartments by nylon filters (Spectra/Mesh Nylon; mesh opening 5 µm). In the first compartment the four mixed diatom cultures infected by Chytridium spp, Rhizophydium type I, II and III were placed, whereas in the second one pre-soaked filters with trigger substances were adjusted on slides. As potential triggers, standards of eight carbohydrates, six amino acids and five fatty acids were used in individual and mixed solutions, respectively. In addition, cell extracts of the host diatoms Achnanthes, Pinnularia, Rhizosolenia and Chaetoceros, grown under a light: dark regime of 24:0 and 12:12, were also tested for their potential to trigger the chemotaxis of zoospores. After five days of incubation under standard culture conditions (f/2 with a salinity of 30, 10 °C, 40 µmol photons m‒2 s‒1, pH 8.5, 18:6 h light: dark regime) the filters were removed from the chambers, stained with Nile Red and DAPI and the number of zoospores were examined employing epifluorescence microscopy. In all tested cases, the filters pre-soaked with whole-cell extracts of the light-stressed hosts attracted the highest numbers of zoospores (86%), followed by the combined carbohydrate standard solution (76%). In contrast, almost all individual standards were found to be weak triggers for zoospore chemotaxis, varying only from 5.2–12.6% of the overall amount of zoospores in the chambers.
Keywords: cheamotaxis, chytrids, carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, parasite-host interactions, zoospores

Title: Chytrids infecting marine diatoms—Part 2: First screening for host defence molecules and their biological activities
Authors: Bettina Scholz 1,2, Frithjof Küpper 3, Wim Vyverman 4 and Ulf Karsten 5
Affiliations: 1 BioPol ehf., Einbúastig 2, 545 Skagaströnd, Iceland; 2 Faculty of Natural Resource Sciences, University of Akureyri, Borgir v. Nordurslod, IS 600 Akureyri, Iceland; 3 Oceanlab, University of Aberdeen, Main Street, Newburgh AB41 6AA, Scotland, United Kingdom; 4 Department of Biology, Section of Protistology and Aquatic Ecology, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000 Ghent, Belgium; 5 Institute of Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology & Phycology, University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 3, 18059 Rostock, Germany
Abstract: Overall 16 monoclonal cultures of four diatom hosts (Achnanthes, Pinnularia, Rhizosolenia and Chaetoceros) were found to be resistant against the onslaught of chytrid zoospores in a former study. Extracts and cell free filtrates of these cultures were used for phytochemical (e.g. phenols) and bioactivity screenings (algaecide, antimicrobial, and particularly zoospores of Chytridium spp, Rhizophydium type I, II and III in cross-experiments). The results of the phytochemical screening indicated in most of the tested extracts the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, phenols and aldehydes. Although in the bioactivity screening antimicrobial, particularly fungicide, effects were observed, zoospores of the chytrid parasites were only weakly affected. In additional experiments these zoospores were still not able to infect their hosts as it was found in the positive controls, suggesting that specific alterations or features of the diatom cell surfaces might have a key function in the resistance of the tested hosts.
Keywords: aldehydes, antimicrobials, chytrids, diatoms, host-parasite interactions, phytochemicals, polyunsaturated fatty acids

Last update: 24 February 2016

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