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Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 1st Congress of Marine Fungal Natural Products Consortium"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Olivier Grovel

University of Nantes, Faculty of Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences, MMS-EA2160, 9, rue Bias BP 53508, 44035 Nantes Cedex 1, France
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +33251125684
Interests: isolation, structure and assessment of marine substances with pharmacological and therapeutic bioactivity; marine toxinology; marine fungi; metabolomics
Guest Editor
Dr. Samuel Bertrand

University of Nantes, Faculty of Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences, MMS-EA2160, 9, rue Bias BP 53508, 44035 Nantes Cedex 1, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: lipidomics, metabolomics, fungal natural products, fungal co-culture, natural product drug discovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, Marine Fungi: a Bioresource for Tomorrow.Marine fungi have been raising many different questions over the past few years, either in terms of their physiology and role in this particular environment, or in relation to their capacity to produce bioactive compounds. These singular organisms are now studied by many scientists with growing interest because they are a renewable source of original and new natural products with potential value in many areas (human health, food, cosmetics, biofuels, etc.).On the 22nd to the 24th of July 2015, the University of Nantes, France, will host the 1st International Conference on Marine Fungal Natural Products (MaFNaP2015), organized by the Marine Fungal Natural Products Consortium. This conference is joint with the 14th International Marine and Freshwater Mycology Symposium.Following an initial workshop held in Canada, in August 2014, this event is dedicated to share the research from all the groups around the world working on marine fungi and marine fungal natural products. It is also expected to facilitate dialogue between research teams working on marine fungi for the implementation of international projects, the sharing of data and results, and article writing. By building a strong community around this area of research, internationally combining academic and industrial partners, we can expect to see lead projects with an impact of great magnitude.The topics will browse different areas of research involving biotechnologies, sustainable and renewable resources of high-value ingredients, innovative analytical methods, biological screening, and natural products discovery, organized in seven sessions: Marine fungal biodiversity and collection Ecology and physiology of marine fungi Marine-sourced fungal chemodiversity From Genes to Molecules: "omics" methods Marine fungal biodiscovery, natural products Chemical ecology Biosynthesis and total synthesis We are expecting around 80-100 international participants at this conference, which will be, we hope, the second of a long series.To extend the impetus this conference will give to the Marine fungi community, the scientific committee organizes a Special Issue of Marine Drugs dedicated to this symposium entitled "Selected Papers from the 1st International Conference on Marine Fungal Natural Products". We kindly invite you to participate in this Special Issue, whatever the area of your marine fungal research.MaFNaP2015 Web Site: http://www.mafnap2015.univ-nantes.frMarine Fungal Natural Products Consortium: http://www.mafnap.org/ Dr. Olivier GrovelDr. Samuel BertrandGuest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Time Dependency of Chemodiversity and Biosynthetic Pathways: An LC-MS Metabolomic Study of Marine-Sourced Penicillium
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(5), 103; doi:10.3390/md14050103
Received: 19 February 2016 / Revised: 21 April 2016 / Accepted: 11 May 2016 / Published: 21 May 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3192 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This work aimed at studying metabolome variations of marine fungal strains along their growth to highlight the importance of the parameter “time” for new natural products discovery. An untargeted time-scale metabolomic study has been performed on two different marine-derived Penicillium strains. They were
[...] Read more.
This work aimed at studying metabolome variations of marine fungal strains along their growth to highlight the importance of the parameter “time” for new natural products discovery. An untargeted time-scale metabolomic study has been performed on two different marine-derived Penicillium strains. They were cultivated for 18 days and their crude extracts were analyzed by HPLC-DAD-HRMS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry) each day. With the example of griseofulvin biosynthesis, a pathway shared by both strains, this work provides a new approach to study biosynthetic pathway regulations, which could be applied to other metabolites and more particularly new ones. Moreover, the results of this study emphasize the interest of such an approach for the discovery of new chemical entities. In particular, at every harvesting time, previously undetected features were observed in the LC-MS (Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry) data. Therefore, harvesting times for metabolite extraction should be performed at different time points to access the hidden metabolome. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Aspergillus Sydowii Marine Fungal Bloom in Australian Coastal Waters, Its Metabolites and Potential Impact on Symbiodinium Dinoflagellates
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(3), 59; doi:10.3390/md14030059
Received: 9 February 2016 / Revised: 3 March 2016 / Accepted: 3 March 2016 / Published: 16 March 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1725 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Dust has been widely recognised as an important source of nutrients in the marine environment and as a vector for transporting pathogenic microorganisms. Disturbingly, in the wake of a dust storm event along the eastern Australian coast line in 2009, the Continuous Plankton
[...] Read more.
Dust has been widely recognised as an important source of nutrients in the marine environment and as a vector for transporting pathogenic microorganisms. Disturbingly, in the wake of a dust storm event along the eastern Australian coast line in 2009, the Continuous Plankton Recorder collected masses of fungal spores and mycelia (~150,000 spores/m3) forming a floating raft that covered a coastal area equivalent to 25 times the surface of England. Cultured A. sydowii strains exhibited varying metabolite profiles, but all produced sydonic acid, a chemotaxonomic marker for A. sydowii. The Australian marine fungal strains share major metabolites and display comparable metabolic diversity to Australian terrestrial strains and to strains pathogenic to Caribbean coral. Secondary colonisation of the rafts by other fungi, including strains of Cladosporium, Penicillium and other Aspergillus species with distinct secondary metabolite profiles, was also encountered. Our bioassays revealed that the dust-derived marine fungal extracts and known A. sydowii metabolites such as sydowic acid, sydowinol and sydowinin A adversely affect photophysiological performance (Fv/Fm) of the coral reef dinoflagellate endosymbiont Symbiodinium. Different Symbiodinium clades exhibited varying sensitivities, mimicking sensitivity to coral bleaching phenomena. The detection of such large amounts of A. sydowii following this dust storm event has potential implications for the health of coral environments such as the Great Barrier Reef. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Deep Subseafloor Fungi as an Untapped Reservoir of Amphipathic Antimicrobial Compounds
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(3), 50; doi:10.3390/md14030050
Received: 14 January 2016 / Revised: 23 February 2016 / Accepted: 2 March 2016 / Published: 10 March 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2122 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The evolving global threat of antimicrobial resistance requires a deep renewal of the antibiotic arsenal including the isolation and characterization of new drugs. Underexplored marine ecosystems may represent an untapped reservoir of novel bioactive molecules. Deep-sea fungi isolated from a record-depth sediment core
[...] Read more.
The evolving global threat of antimicrobial resistance requires a deep renewal of the antibiotic arsenal including the isolation and characterization of new drugs. Underexplored marine ecosystems may represent an untapped reservoir of novel bioactive molecules. Deep-sea fungi isolated from a record-depth sediment core of almost 2000 m below the seafloor were investigated for antimicrobial activities. This antimicrobial screening, using 16 microbial targets, revealed 33% of filamentous fungi synthesizing bioactive compounds with activities against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Interestingly, occurrence of antimicrobial producing isolates was well correlated with the complexity of the habitat (in term of microbial richness), as higher antimicrobial activities were obtained at specific layers of the sediment core. It clearly highlights complex deep-sea habitats as chemical battlefields where synthesis of numerous bioactive compounds appears critical for microbial competition. The six most promising deep subseafloor fungal isolates were selected for the production and extraction of bioactive compounds. Depending on the fungal isolates, antimicrobial compounds were only biosynthesized in semi-liquid or solid-state conditions as no antimicrobial activities were ever detected using liquid fermentation. An exception was made for one fungal isolate, and the extraction procedure designed to extract amphipathic compounds was successful and highlighted the amphiphilic profile of the bioactive metabolites. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Six New Polyketide Decalin Compounds from Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum 328#
Mar. Drugs 2015, 13(10), 6306-6318; doi:10.3390/md13106306
Received: 13 August 2015 / Accepted: 26 September 2015 / Published: 10 October 2015
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Six new compounds with polyketide decalin ring, peaurantiogriseols A–F (16), along with two known compounds, aspermytin A (7), 1-propanone,3-hydroxy-1- (1,2,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-2,5-dihydroxy-1,2,6-trimethyl-1-naphthalenyl) (8), were isolated from the fermentation products of mangrove endophytic fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum 328#. Their
[...] Read more.
Six new compounds with polyketide decalin ring, peaurantiogriseols A–F (16), along with two known compounds, aspermytin A (7), 1-propanone,3-hydroxy-1- (1,2,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-2,5-dihydroxy-1,2,6-trimethyl-1-naphthalenyl) (8), were isolated from the fermentation products of mangrove endophytic fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum 328#. Their structures were elucidated based on their structure analysis. The absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 2 were determined by 1H NMR analysis of their Mosher esters; the absolute configurations of 36 were determined by using theoretical calculations of electronic circular dichroism (ECD). Compounds 18 showed low inhibitory activity against human aldose reductase, no activity of inducing neurite outgrowth, nor antimicrobial activity. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(7), 137; doi:10.3390/md14070137
Received: 8 June 2016 / Revised: 6 July 2016 / Accepted: 12 July 2016 / Published: 21 July 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (6280 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute
[...] Read more.
Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics. Full article
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Open AccessReview Natural Products from Marine Fungi—Still an Underrepresented Resource
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(1), 19; doi:10.3390/md14010019
Received: 20 November 2015 / Revised: 28 December 2015 / Accepted: 12 January 2016 / Published: 16 January 2016
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (1895 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Marine fungi represent a huge potential for new natural products and an increased number of new metabolites have become known over the past years, while much of the hidden potential still needs to be uncovered. Representative examples of biodiversity studies of marine fungi
[...] Read more.
Marine fungi represent a huge potential for new natural products and an increased number of new metabolites have become known over the past years, while much of the hidden potential still needs to be uncovered. Representative examples of biodiversity studies of marine fungi and of natural products from a diverse selection of marine fungi from the author’s lab are highlighting important aspects of this research. If one considers the huge phylogenetic diversity of marine fungi and their almost ubiquitous distribution, and realizes that most of the published work on secondary metabolites of marine fungi has focused on just a few genera, strictly speaking Penicillium, Aspergillus and maybe also Fusarium and Cladosporium, the diversity of marine fungi is not adequately represented in investigations on their secondary metabolites and the less studied species deserve special attention. In addition to results on recently discovered new secondary metabolites of Penicillium species, the diversity of fungi in selected marine habitats is highlighted and examples of groups of secondary metabolites produced by representatives of a variety of different genera and their bioactivities are presented. Special focus is given to the production of groups of derivatives of metabolites by the fungi and to significant differences in biological activities due to small structural changes. Full article
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