Special Issue "Feature Paper 2013"

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A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Urs A. Meyer (Website)

Biozentrum-Pharmazentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50/70, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland
Phone: +41 43 535 9049
Fax: +41 61 43 535 9049
Interests: genomic medicine; pharmacogenomics; drug disposition; host and environmental factors influencing therapeutic response; personalized medicine

Special Issue Information

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 500 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Attitudes towards Social Networking and Sharing Behaviors among Consumers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomics
J. Pers. Med. 2013, 3(4), 275-287; doi:10.3390/jpm3040275
Received: 17 July 2013 / Revised: 26 August 2013 / Accepted: 22 September 2013 / Published: 14 October 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (399 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Little is known about how consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genetic services share personal genetic risk information. In an age of ubiquitous online networking and rapid development of social networking tools, understanding how consumers share personal genetic risk assessments is critical in the [...] Read more.
Little is known about how consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genetic services share personal genetic risk information. In an age of ubiquitous online networking and rapid development of social networking tools, understanding how consumers share personal genetic risk assessments is critical in the development of appropriate and effective policies. This exploratory study investigates how consumers share personal genetic information and attitudes towards social networking behaviors. Methods: Adult participants aged 23 to 72 years old who purchased direct-to-consumer genetic testing from a personal genomics company were administered a web-based survey regarding their sharing activities and social networking behaviors related to their personal genetic test results. Results: 80 participants completed the survey; of those, 45% shared results on Facebook and 50.9% reported meeting or reconnecting with more than 10 other individuals through the sharing of their personal genetic information. For help interpreting test results, 70.4% turned to Internet websites and online sources, compared to 22.7% who consulted their healthcare providers. Amongst participants, 51.8% reported that they believe the privacy of their personal genetic information would be breached in the future. Conclusion: Consumers actively utilize online social networking tools to help them share and interpret their personal genetic information. These findings suggest a need for careful consideration of policy recommendations in light of the current ambiguity of regulation and oversight of consumer initiated sharing activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper 2013)
Open AccessArticle Rapid Collection of Biospecimens by Automated Identification of Patients Eligible for Pharmacoepigenetic Studies
J. Pers. Med. 2013, 3(4), 263-274; doi:10.3390/jpm3040263
Received: 30 May 2013 / Revised: 4 September 2013 / Accepted: 10 September 2013 / Published: 26 September 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (410 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Epigenetics plays an important role in regulating gene expression, and can be modified by environmental factors and physiological conditions. Studying epigenetics is a promising approach to potentially improving the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of human diseases, and to providing personalized medical care. [...] Read more.
Epigenetics plays an important role in regulating gene expression, and can be modified by environmental factors and physiological conditions. Studying epigenetics is a promising approach to potentially improving the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of human diseases, and to providing personalized medical care. However, the role of epigenetics in the development of diseases is not clear because epigenetic markers may be both mediators and outcomes of human diseases. It is particularly complicated to study pharmacoepigenetics, as medication use may modify the epigenetic profile. To address the challenges facing pharmacoepigenetic research of human diseases, we developed a novel design to rapidly identify, contact, and recruit participants and collect specimens for longitudinal studies of pharmacoepigenetics. Using data in real-time from electronic medical record systems, we can identify patients recently start on new medications and who also have a blood test. Prior to disposal of the leftover blood by the clinical laboratory, we are able to contact and recruit these patients, enabling us to use both their leftover baseline blood sample as well as leftover specimens at future tests. With treatment-naïve and follow-up specimens, this system is able to study both epigenetic markers associated with disease without treatment effect as well as treatment-related epigenetic changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper 2013)
Open AccessArticle A Method for Biomarker Directed Survival Prediction in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Carboplatin-Based Therapy
J. Pers. Med. 2013, 3(3), 251-262; doi:10.3390/jpm3030251
Received: 30 July 2013 / Revised: 27 August 2013 / Accepted: 30 August 2013 / Published: 12 September 2013
PDF Full-text (407 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Platinum-based chemotherapy is a primary treatment of choice for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Analytical methods to specifically evaluate biomarkers predictive of therapeutic efficacy have not been developed. Two randomized phase III trials of carboplatin-based chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC were used for [...] Read more.
Platinum-based chemotherapy is a primary treatment of choice for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Analytical methods to specifically evaluate biomarkers predictive of therapeutic efficacy have not been developed. Two randomized phase III trials of carboplatin-based chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC were used for learning and validating the predictive value of ERCC1 in situ protein levels, as measured by accurate quantitative analysis (AQUA). A novel Bayesian method was applied to identify the outcome-based threshold in the learning trial only. Overall survival (OS) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis with log rank testing to determine statistical significance in the validating trial. For patients treated with gemcitabine and carboplatin, the median OS was 9.5 months (95% CI 6.7 to 11.8) for the high ERCC1 group compared to 15.6 months (95% CI 11.6 to 24.8) for the low ERCC1 group in the validation trial (log rank p-value = 0.007). The hazard ratio for low ERCC1 was 0.598 (95% CI, 0.394 to 0.908; p = 0.016) relative to high ERCC1 adjusted for age, sex, and histology. Conclusions: Patients with advanced NSCLC could be stratified into high and low ERCC1 expression groups. Patients with low levels benefited from platinum-based chemotherapy, whereas those with high levels did not. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper 2013)

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessCommentary The Use of Registries to Improve Cancer Treatment: A National Database for Patients Treated with Interleukin-2 (IL-2)
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(1), 52-64; doi:10.3390/jpm4010052
Received: 27 November 2013 / Revised: 15 February 2014 / Accepted: 27 February 2014 / Published: 7 March 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (719 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Registries evaluating un-randomized patients have provided valuable information with respect to a therapy’s utility, treatment practices, and evolution over time. While immunotherapy for cancer has been around for more than three decades, data collection in the form of a registry has not [...] Read more.
Registries evaluating un-randomized patients have provided valuable information with respect to a therapy’s utility, treatment practices, and evolution over time. While immunotherapy for cancer has been around for more than three decades, data collection in the form of a registry has not been undertaken. The authors believe that establishing a registry to study HD IL-2 immunotherapy, which has been the only systemic therapy producing long term unmaintained remissions for advanced kidney cancer and melanoma for over 20 years, will be an important resource in understanding the impact of immunotherapy with HD IL-2 in a rapidly changing therapeutic environment. Optimizing administration and improving selection of appropriate patients likely to benefit from HD IL-2 immunotherapy are two of many benefits to be derived from this endeavor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper 2013)
Open AccessOpinion The Need for Clinical Decision Support Integrated with the Electronic Health Record for the Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing Information
J. Pers. Med. 2013, 3(4), 306-325; doi:10.3390/jpm3040306
Received: 21 October 2013 / Revised: 23 November 2013 / Accepted: 12 December 2013 / Published: 18 December 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (567 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is rapidly approaching widespread clinical application. Technology advancements over the past decade, since the first human genome was decoded, have made it feasible to use WGS for clinical care. Future advancements will likely drive down the price to [...] Read more.
Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is rapidly approaching widespread clinical application. Technology advancements over the past decade, since the first human genome was decoded, have made it feasible to use WGS for clinical care. Future advancements will likely drive down the price to the point wherein WGS is routinely available for care. However, were this to happen today, most of the genetic information available to guide clinical care would go unused due to the complexity of genetics, limited physician proficiency in genetics, and lack of genetics professionals in the clinical workforce. Furthermore, these limitations are unlikely to change in the future. As such, the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to guide genome-guided clinical decision-making is imperative. In this manuscript, we describe the barriers to widespread clinical application of WGS information, describe how CDS can be an important tool for overcoming these barriers, and provide clinical examples of how genome-enabled CDS can be used in the clinical setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper 2013)
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