Special Issue "Climate Change, Coasts and Coastal Risk"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Roshanka Ranasinghe

1. Department of Water Science and Engineering, UNESCO-IHE, PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft, The Netherlands
2. Water Engineering and Management, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
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Guest Editor
Dr. Ruben Jongejan

1. Jongejan RMC, Schoolstraat 4, 2611 HS, Delft, The Netherlands
2. Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Delft, The Netherlands.
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Projected climate change driven variations in mean sea level (i.e., Sea level rise), wave conditions, storm surge, and riverflow will affect the coastal zone in many ways. On the other hand, the coastal zone is the most heavily populated and developed land zone in the world with rapid expansions in settlements, urbanization, infrastructure, economic activities and tourism.

The combination of coastal climate change impacts and their effect on the ever increasing human utilization of the coastal zone will invariably result in increasing coastal risk in the coming decades. However, while the economic damage (potential consequence) that can be caused by CC driven coastal inundation and erosion (potential hazard) is likely to increase, foregoing land-use opportunities in coastal regions is also costly (opportunity cost).  Thus, a ‘zero risk’-policy could have severe economic consequences, while high risk policies could lead to risks that are unacceptable to society and individuals. Developing appropriate policies and strategies for land-use planning purposes is, therefore, a delicate balancing act.  

To avoid unacceptable future risks, due to coastal hazards and/or sub-optimal land use, it is imperative that risk informed and sustainable coastal planning/management strategies are implemented sooner rather than later. This requires comprehensive coastal risk assessments which combine state-of-the-art consequence (or damage) modelling and coastal hazard modelling. Apart from being of crucial importance to coastal managers/planners, this type of risk quantification will also be invaluable to the insurance and re-insurance industries for insurance pricing, which may have a follow-on effect on coastal property values. However, the present level of knowledge on generally applicable coastal hazard and risk assessment approaches, especially at local scale (~10 km) is rather limited. To help bridge this knowledge gap, this Special Issue invites original scientific contributions focusing on:

  • Projections of climate change driven variations in coastal forcing (SLR, storm surge, waves)
  • Assessment of climate change driven physical impacts on coasts
  • Quantifying economic and/or environmental risk in coastal zones

Research articles, review articles, case studies and perspectives are welcome to this Special Issue. We look forward to receiving original and inspiring contributions.

Prof. Roshanka Ranasinghe
Dr. Ruben Jongejan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle How Well Do AR5 Sea Surface-Height Model Projections Match Observational Rates of Sea-Level Rise at the Regional Scale?
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2018, 6(1), 11; doi:10.3390/jmse6010011
Received: 26 November 2017 / Revised: 8 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018
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Abstract
The reliance upon and importance of climate models continues to grow in line with strengthening evidence of a changing climate system and the necessity to provide credible projections for risk assessment to guide policy development, mitigation and adaptation responses. The utility of the
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The reliance upon and importance of climate models continues to grow in line with strengthening evidence of a changing climate system and the necessity to provide credible projections for risk assessment to guide policy development, mitigation and adaptation responses. The utility of the models to project regional rates of sea-level rise over the course of the 21st century is reliant on evaluating model outputs against global observational data (principally altimetry products). This study compares rates of sea-level rise from observational data records (tide gauges) against the ensemble mean of the model-projection products used in AR5 at 19 sites around the world over the decade of common data coverage (2007–2016) using enhanced time-series analysis techniques. Although it could be concluded that the observational and model-projected average velocity agree (95% confidence level (CL)), error margins are comparatively wide, masking the fact that the mean velocity for the model-projection products exceed observational records for nearly all stations and Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) experiments, and are likely in the range of 1.6–2.5 mm/year. The analysis might provide an early warning sign that the evaluation of ocean model components with respect to projected mean sea level could be relevantly improved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Coasts and Coastal Risk)
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Open AccessArticle Two Centuries of Climate Change and Climate Variability, East Coast Australia
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2018, 6(1), 3; doi:10.3390/jmse6010003
Received: 11 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 3 January 2018
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Abstract
On the east Australian coast, climate change is expressed as a slowly rising sea level. Analysis of records, dating back over two centuries, also shows oscillating multidecadal ‘storm’ and ‘drought’ dominated climate periods that are distinct from long-term climate change. Climate variability, as
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On the east Australian coast, climate change is expressed as a slowly rising sea level. Analysis of records, dating back over two centuries, also shows oscillating multidecadal ‘storm’ and ‘drought’ dominated climate periods that are distinct from long-term climate change. Climate variability, as expressed by these distinct multidecadal periods, is generally associated with phases of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation Index (IPO). Two centuries of climate and coastline response are examined for the central east coast of Australia, between Fraser Island and Coffs Harbour. The long record has been compiled by analysing a wide range of indicators and observations, including: historical accounts, storm records, sea level trends, assessment of storm erosion faces, and coastal movement in relation to fixed monuments, surveys, and maps. Periods of suppressed sea level, beach accretion, and drought were found to be associated with strongly positive IPO. Periods of higher sea level, increased storminess, and beach erosion were associated with strongly negative IPO. Understanding the behaviour of climate variability over different timescales has the potential to improve the understanding of, and responses to, climate change. This will be important in the sustainable management of geomorphic and ecological systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Coasts and Coastal Risk)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Quantifying Economic Value of Coastal Ecosystem Services: A Review
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2018, 6(1), 5; doi:10.3390/jmse6010005
Received: 10 November 2017 / Revised: 28 December 2017 / Accepted: 29 December 2017 / Published: 9 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (975 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The complexity of quantifying ecosystem services in monetary terms has long been a challenging issue for economists and ecologists. Many case specific valuation studies have been carried out in various parts of the World. Yet, a coherent review on the valuation of coastal
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The complexity of quantifying ecosystem services in monetary terms has long been a challenging issue for economists and ecologists. Many case specific valuation studies have been carried out in various parts of the World. Yet, a coherent review on the valuation of coastal ecosystem services (CES), which systematically describes fundamental concepts, analyzes reported applications, and addresses the issue of climate change (CC) impacts on the monetary value of CES is still lacking. Here, we take a step towards addressing this knowledge gap by pursuing a coherent review that aims to provide policy makers and researchers in multidisciplinary teams with a summary of the state-of-the-art and a guideline on the process of economic valuation of CES and potential changes in these values due to CC impacts. The article highlights the main concepts of CES valuation studies and offers a systematic analysis of the best practices by analyzing two global scale and 30 selected local and regional case studies, in which different CES have been valued. Our analysis shows that coral reefs and mangroves are among the most frequently valued ecosystems, while sea-grass beds are the least considered ones. Currently, tourism and recreation services as well as storm protection are two of the most considered services representing higher estimated value than other CES. In terms of the valuation techniques used, avoided damage, replacement and substitute cost method as well as stated preference method are among the most commonly used valuation techniques. Following the above analysis, we propose a methodological framework that provides step-wise guidance and better insight into the linkages between climate change impacts and the monetary value of CES. This highlights two main types of CC impacts on CES: one being the climate regulation services of coastal ecosystems, and the other being the monetary value of services, which is subject to substantial uncertainty. Finally, a systematic four-step approach is proposed to effectively monetize potential CC driven variations in the value of CES. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Coasts and Coastal Risk)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Projected 21st century coastal flooding in the Southern California Bight. Part 1: Development of the third generation CoSMoS model
Authors: Andy O'Neill and Li Erikson

Title: Projected 21st century coastal flooding in the Southern California Bight. Part 2: Extreme events and variations in coastal response
Authors: Andy O'Neill and Li Erikson

Title: Reliability-based optimal upgrading of a rubble-mound breakwater under climate change
Author: Panagiota Galiatsatou etc.

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