Special Issue "The Knee: Structure, Function and Rehabilitation"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Associate Prof. Nick Caplan

Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: rehabilitation; knee; low back; spinal stability; muscle

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Use of the knee joint is integral to many sporting activities and more general activities of daily living, such as walking or climbing stairs. However, knee injuries can be some of the most frequently occurring of all joints, leading to pain, disability, and reduced quality of life. These injuries can be the result of acute high abnormal loading (e.g., anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, patellar dislocation), or as the result of chronic overuse (osteoarthritis). In order to help restore the structure and function of the knee, and to reduce pain, many interventions can be used which range from exercise rehabilitation through to surgical interventions. For this Special Issue, “The Knee: Structure, Function and Rehabilitation”, authors are invited to submit original research papers and current review articles that relate to the normal and pathological structure and function of the knee, as well as the rehabilitation of the injured knee towards normal structure and function.

Dr. Nick Caplan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ligament
  • cartilage
  • muscle
  • injury
  • sport
  • clinical
  • arthroplasty
  • ligament reconstruction
  • joint stability

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in Adolescents Affected by Patellar Instability
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2017, 2(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk2020013
Received: 12 February 2017 / Revised: 14 April 2017 / Accepted: 28 April 2017 / Published: 30 April 2017
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Abstract
Patellar instability is a heterogeneous group of morphological and functional disorders of the knee extensor mechanism. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been recognized as being important in stabilizing the patella and preventing lateral patellar dislocation. Recurrent dislocations in the pediatric population may
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Patellar instability is a heterogeneous group of morphological and functional disorders of the knee extensor mechanism. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been recognized as being important in stabilizing the patella and preventing lateral patellar dislocation. Recurrent dislocations in the pediatric population may benefit from surgical intervention. The aim of this study is to retrospectively evaluate adolescent patients treated with surgical reconstruction of medial patello-femoral ligament. Between January 2009 and December 2014, seven patients with patellar instability were treated at the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the University of Catania, Sicily. Five patients (71.4%) were female and two (28.6%) were male. The mean age at the time of surgery was 14.9 ± 1.1 years (range 13–16 years). All cases were treated with reconstruction of the MPFL. Clinical outcomes and complications were reported. Mean follow-up was 26.1 ± 10.9 months (range 12–46 months). Evaluation at two years after surgery identified an average Knee Society Score (KSS) of 94.3 ± 7.4 (range 78–100). An excellent result was obtained in six patients (85.7%) and a good result was obtained in one patient (14.3%). A recurrence was reported in one patient (14.3%). This study shows that surgical treatment of patellar instability by reconstruction of MPFL leads to satisfying results at mid-term follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Knee: Structure, Function and Rehabilitation)
Open AccessArticle The Duality of Knee Functional Axes and Foot Contact
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2016, 1(4), 387-395; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk1040387
Received: 6 September 2016 / Revised: 4 November 2016 / Accepted: 10 November 2016 / Published: 18 November 2016
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Abstract
Estimating the knee functional axis (KFA) is crucial to both correctly implanting a prosthesis and accessing joint kinematics. Researchers have reported on the KFA mainly with regard to manual management of flexion–extension movements performed passively without any voluntary movements. Active touch and movement
[...] Read more.
Estimating the knee functional axis (KFA) is crucial to both correctly implanting a prosthesis and accessing joint kinematics. Researchers have reported on the KFA mainly with regard to manual management of flexion–extension movements performed passively without any voluntary movements. Active touch and movement refers to what is ordinarily called touching—variations in skin stimulation caused by surfaces are altered together by variations in motor activity. This fact is worth noting because it is often neglected that locomotion and its surfaces form an inseparable pair. The objective of this study was to confirm the distinction between touching and being touched. We were particularly interested in measuring the instantaneous axes of the knee (IAK) during locomotion. We propose the invariant structure of the knee as an attempt to distill a kind of higher-order simplification of a knee model relative to the enormous complexities of analytical anatomical objects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Knee: Structure, Function and Rehabilitation)
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Open AccessArticle The Effects of Exercise and Kinesio Tape on Physical Limitations in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2016, 1(4), 355-368; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk1040355
Received: 9 June 2016 / Revised: 8 September 2016 / Accepted: 18 September 2016 / Published: 18 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1363 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of kinesio taping (KT) in combination with moderate adapted exercise on the functional outcome of patients with knee osteoarthritis. We included 66 patients who presented pain and functional impairment with osteoarthritis. At the
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The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of kinesio taping (KT) in combination with moderate adapted exercise on the functional outcome of patients with knee osteoarthritis. We included 66 patients who presented pain and functional impairment with osteoarthritis. At the end of the treatment, only 57 patients remained because nine patients were excluded. Patients were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: (1) exercise group; (2) exercise KT with tension application (stabilizing effect) group; (3) exercise KT without tension application (draining effect) group. We used different methods of investigation: the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, the Visual Analogue Scaling Score for Pain, the Timed Up and Go test and analgesic consumption. Our results showed a reduction in knee pain, improvement in knee function and also less need for medication in patients with knee osteoarthritis treated with kinesio taping in combination with exercise for, at least, a period of three months. In conclusion, we can assert that therapeutic knee kinesio taping in association with a moderate adapted training is an effective method for the management of pain and disability limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Knee: Structure, Function and Rehabilitation)
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Graphical abstract

Review

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Open AccessReview Anatomy and Physiology of Knee Stability
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2017, 2(4), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk2040034
Received: 28 June 2017 / Revised: 10 September 2017 / Accepted: 20 September 2017 / Published: 24 September 2017
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Abstract
Knee instability has been the focus of large number of studies over the last decade; however, a high incidence rate of injury still exists. The aim of this short report is to examine knee joint anatomy and physiology with respect to knee stability.
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Knee instability has been the focus of large number of studies over the last decade; however, a high incidence rate of injury still exists. The aim of this short report is to examine knee joint anatomy and physiology with respect to knee stability. Knee joint stability requires the integration of a complex set of anatomical structures and physiological mechanism. Compromising any of these structures leads to destabilisation and increased risk of injuries. This review highlights the structure and soft tissue of the knee that contribute to its stability and function. This introduction is part of the Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology’s Special Issue “The Knee: Structure, Function and Rehabilitation”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Knee: Structure, Function and Rehabilitation)
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