Special Issue "Artificial Organs and Biomaterials"

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A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2011)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Dimitrios Stamatialis

University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Biomaterials Science & Technology (BST), Zuidhorst, ZH-254, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +31 (0)53 489 2155
Interests: (bio) artificial organs; tissue regeneration; biomedical membrane applications; biomaterials; (bio) separations
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Naoyuki Nomura

Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: metallic biomaterials; mechanical property; porous scaffold

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The artificial organs and biomaterials have become increasingly important and these are definitely necessary for the state-of-the-art medical treatment. Number of researches on the superior properties and novel functions of biomaterials, including metals, ceramics and polymers are continuously conducted for implants and medical devices. In addition, the development of functional materials for regenerative medicine and nano-bio technology has actively performed in recent years.

It is becoming obvious that for the development of an artificial organ, the selection of the proper biomaterial and its processing are critical factors. Besides, proper understanding of the biomaterial – living tissue interactions and of the much transport in the organ is also very important for the proper function of the organ.

For this special issue, we invite all contributions dealing with the above complex issues. And we hope that this issue will help readers to obtain recent advances on artificial organs and biomaterials in terms of their properties and morphology for future medical applications.

Prof. Dr. Naoyuki Nomura
Dr. Dimitrios Stamatialis
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • artificial organs
  • implants
  • membranes
  • scaffolds
  • tissue regeneration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Prediction of True Circulatory Decompensation in Chronic Heart Failure for Optimal Timing of Mechanical Circulatory Support: Non-Invasive Arterial-Ventricular Coupling
J. Funct. Biomater. 2012, 3(1), 100-113; doi:10.3390/jfb3010100
Received: 8 December 2011 / Revised: 18 January 2012 / Accepted: 28 January 2012 / Published: 1 February 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1081 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Prospective comparative studies to predict the risk of hemodynamic deterioration in patients referred for transplantation were performed on the basis of standard invasive and non-invasive data and new wave intensity (WI) parameters. Methods and results: Study Group 1 consisted of 151 consecutive
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Background: Prospective comparative studies to predict the risk of hemodynamic deterioration in patients referred for transplantation were performed on the basis of standard invasive and non-invasive data and new wave intensity (WI) parameters. Methods and results: Study Group 1 consisted of 151 consecutive outpatients (age 48.7 ± 12 years; 110 men) with end-stage dilative cardiomyopathy. Group 2, consisting of 11 consecutive patients (age 50 ± 11 years; 6 men) with sinus rhythm and “true” decompensation, was used to create “critical values” of WI. There were no demographic or somatic (weight and height) differences between the groups. The follow-up period of ambulatory patients was 31 ± 8 months. Non-invasive WI was studied in the common carotid artery. Complete invasive and non-invasive data were also recorded on the day of investigation. During follow-up 44 pts were lost; there were 15 cardiac deaths (10%), life-saving ventricular assist device implantation in 10 (6.6%) and transplantation in 19 (12.7%). For statistical purposes this group was named the “events” Group B (n = 44). A predisposing factor for events (death, “true” decompensation and “urgent” transplantation in ambulatory patients) was low first peak (“cut-off value” assessed in Group 2 < 4100 mmHg*s³) (OR 45.6, CI 14.5–143.3, p < 0.001). Less powerful predictors of the risk of deterioration were pulmonary capillary pressure (PCP), diastolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and E/A mitral wave relation (p = 0.05). Conclusions: The new ventricular-arterial coupling parameter 1st peak of WI can potentially be used to distinguish patients at high risk for true deterioration and death. This parameter can be used to predict the need for assist device implantation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Artificial Organs and Biomaterials)
Open AccessArticle A Review of Gene Delivery and Stem Cell Based Therapies for Regenerating Inner Ear Hair Cells
J. Funct. Biomater. 2011, 2(3), 249-270; doi:10.3390/jfb2030249
Received: 10 August 2011 / Revised: 31 August 2011 / Accepted: 5 September 2011 / Published: 13 September 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (334 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With
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Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of mammalian and non-mammalian hair cells a variety of strategies have emerged to restore lost hair cells are being developed. Two predominant strategies have developed to restore hair cells: transfer of genes responsible for hair cell genesis and replacement of missing cells via transfer of stem cells. In this review article, we evaluate the use of several genes involved in hair cell regeneration, the advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors employed in inner ear gene delivery and the insights gained from the use of embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent stem cells in generating inner ear hair cells. Understanding the role of genes, vectors and stem cells in therapeutic strategies led us to explore potential solutions to overcome the limitations associated with their use in hair cell regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Artificial Organs and Biomaterials)

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