Special Issue "Recent Developments in Cartography and Display Technologies"

Quicklinks

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Julia Siemer (Website)

Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Regina, 3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2, Canada
Phone: +1 306 585 4405
Fax: +1 306 585 4815
Interests: thematic cartography; visualization in GIS; atlas cartography; cultural mapping; geomedical mapping

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cartography has undergone dramatic changes in recent years. In less than 30 years, traditional cartographic technologies have virtually disappeared. At the same time, spatial data and visualization of such data are ubiquitous and, due to emerging new digital technologies, cartography has undergone a process of democratization. This development opens new paths of distributing spatial information, even though established principles of symbolization and mapping techniques are still essential for effective cartographic communication.

Currently, cartography is facing new challenges, such as displaying complex spatial data on mobile devises, variable scales, sound or 3D visualization, to name just a few.

You are invited to contribute to this Special Issue of the International Journal for Geo-Information which is focusing on recent developments in cartography and display technologies. Contributions should be of theoretical or empirical nature, highlighting new, innovative or thought-provoking aspects of cartography and display technologies.

Dr. Julia Siemer
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 900 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • geovisualization
  • cartographic display
  • GIS and cartography
  • democratization of cartography
  • mobile cartography
  • virtual mapping
  • crowd sourcing of spatial data
  • neocartography

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Interactive Presentation of Geo-Spatial Climate Data in Multi-Display Environments
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(2), 493-514; doi:10.3390/ijgi4020493
Received: 15 December 2014 / Revised: 9 February 2015 / Accepted: 10 March 2015 / Published: 7 April 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (11658 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The visual analysis of complex geo-spatial data is a challenging task. Typically, different views are used to communicate different aspects. With changing topics of interest, however, novel views are required. This leads to dynamically changing presentations of multiple views. This paper introduces [...] Read more.
The visual analysis of complex geo-spatial data is a challenging task. Typically, different views are used to communicate different aspects. With changing topics of interest, however, novel views are required. This leads to dynamically changing presentations of multiple views. This paper introduces a novel approach to support such scenarios. It allows for a spontaneous incorporation of views from different sources and to automatically layout these views in a multi-display environment. Furthermore, we introduce an enhanced undo/redo mechanism for this setting, which records user interactions and, in this way, enables swift reconfigurations of displayed views. Hence, users can fluently switch the focus of visual analysis without extensive manual interactions. We demonstrate our approach by the particular use case of discussing geo-spatial climate data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments in Cartography and Display Technologies)
Open AccessArticle Geovisual Analytics Approach to Exploring Public Political Discourse on Twitter
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(1), 337-366; doi:10.3390/ijgi4010337
Received: 15 December 2014 / Revised: 29 January 2015 / Accepted: 16 February 2015 / Published: 5 March 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (6554 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We introduce spatial patterns of Tweets visualization (SPoTvis), a web-based geovisual analytics tool for exploring messages on Twitter (or “tweets”) collected about political discourse, and illustrate the potential of the approach with a case study focused on a set of linked political [...] Read more.
We introduce spatial patterns of Tweets visualization (SPoTvis), a web-based geovisual analytics tool for exploring messages on Twitter (or “tweets”) collected about political discourse, and illustrate the potential of the approach with a case study focused on a set of linked political events in the United States. In October 2013, the U.S. Congressional debate over the allocation of funds to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly known as the ACA or “Obamacare”) culminated in a 16-day government shutdown. Meanwhile the online health insurance marketplace related to the ACA was making a public debut hampered by performance and functionality problems. Messages on Twitter during this time period included sharply divided opinions about these events, with many people angry about the shutdown and others supporting the delay of the ACA implementation. SPoTvis supports the analysis of these events using an interactive map connected dynamically to a term polarity plot; through the SPoTvis interface, users can compare the dominant subthemes of Tweets in any two states or congressional districts. Demographic attributes and political information on the display, coupled with functionality to show (dis)similar features, enrich users’ understandings of the units being compared. Relationships among places, politics and discourse on Twitter are quantified using statistical analyses and explored visually using SPoTvis. A two-part user study evaluates SPoTvis’ ability to enable insight discovery, as well as the tool’s design, functionality and applicability to other contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments in Cartography and Display Technologies)
Open AccessArticle User-Centered Design for Interactive Maps: A Case Study in Crime Analysis
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(1), 262-301; doi:10.3390/ijgi4010262
Received: 2 November 2014 / Revised: 9 December 2014 / Accepted: 26 January 2015 / Published: 16 February 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (4090 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we address the topic of user-centered design (UCD) for cartography, GIScience, and visual analytics. Interactive maps are ubiquitous in modern society, yet they often fail to “work” as they could or should. UCD describes the process of ensuring interface [...] Read more.
In this paper, we address the topic of user-centered design (UCD) for cartography, GIScience, and visual analytics. Interactive maps are ubiquitous in modern society, yet they often fail to “work” as they could or should. UCD describes the process of ensuring interface success—map-based or otherwise—by gathering input and feedback from target users throughout the design and development of the interface. We contribute to the expanding literature on UCD for interactive maps in two ways. First, we synthesize core concepts on UCD from cartography and related fields, as well as offer new ideas, in order to organize existing frameworks and recommendations regarding the UCD of interactive maps. Second, we report on a case study UCD process for GeoVISTA CrimeViz, an interactive and web-based mapping application supporting visual analytics of criminal activity in space and time. The GeoVISTA CrimeViz concept and interface were improved iteratively by working through a series of user→utility→usability loops in which target users provided input and feedback on needs and designs (user), prompting revisions to the conceptualization and functional requirements of the interface (utility), and ultimately leading to new mockups and prototypes of the interface (usability) for additional evaluation by target users (user… and so on). Together, the background review and case study offer guidance for applying UCD to interactive mapping projects, and demonstrate the benefit of including target users throughout design and development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments in Cartography and Display Technologies)
Open AccessArticle A GIS Approach to Urban History: Rome in the 18th Century
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(4), 1293-1316; doi:10.3390/ijgi3041293
Received: 4 August 2014 / Revised: 18 November 2014 / Accepted: 18 November 2014 / Published: 5 December 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (23811 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article explores the integration of GIS technology with urban historical studies, focusing on one case study from the 18th century, the project Historical atlas of the modern Rome. The methodology employed in this project allows for effectiveness and accuracy in historical [...] Read more.
This article explores the integration of GIS technology with urban historical studies, focusing on one case study from the 18th century, the project Historical atlas of the modern Rome. The methodology employed in this project allows for effectiveness and accuracy in historical data acquisition and integration, which enables refined analyses of socioeconomic and environmental phenomena. The approach outlined in this article allowed researchers from different disciplines—city historians, archaeologists, demographists, economists, and so on—to interpret urban phenomenologies according to different thematic keys. These interpretations were derived from archival sources that complement each other and offer diversified insights into the urban context. The techniques described in the article are based on methods of data acquisition and spatial analysis developed in a GIS environment by exploiting the effectiveness of this technology in the quantitative treatment of cartographic and documentary sources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments in Cartography and Display Technologies)
Open AccessArticle Uncertainty in Geographic Data on Bivariate Maps: An Examination of Visualization Preference and Decision Making
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(4), 1180-1197; doi:10.3390/ijgi3041180
Received: 31 July 2014 / Revised: 13 October 2014 / Accepted: 13 October 2014 / Published: 24 October 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2599 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Uncertainty exists widely in geographic data. However, it is often disregarded during data analysis and decision making. Proper visualization of uncertainty can help map users understand uncertainty in geographic data and make informed decisions. The study reported in this paper examines map [...] Read more.
Uncertainty exists widely in geographic data. However, it is often disregarded during data analysis and decision making. Proper visualization of uncertainty can help map users understand uncertainty in geographic data and make informed decisions. The study reported in this paper examines map users’ perception of and preferences for different visual variables to report uncertainty on bivariate maps. It also explores the possible impact that knowledge and training in Geographic Information Sciences and Systems (GIS) may have on map users’ decision making with uncertainty information. A survey was conducted among college students with and without GIS training. The results showed that boundary fuzziness and color lightness were the most preferred visual variables for representing uncertainty using bivariate maps. GIS knowledge and training was found helpful for some survey participants in their decision making using bivariate uncertainty maps. The results from this case study provide guidance for reporting uncertainty on bivariate maps, aiming at encouraging informed decision making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments in Cartography and Display Technologies)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
IJGI Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
ijgi@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to IJGI
Back to Top