Special Issue "WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Are Countries Fully Implementing It?"

Quicklinks

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Adriana Blanco Marquizo
Advisor Tobacco Control Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, 525 23rd Street, Washington, DC 20037, USA
Website: http://paho.org/tobacco
E-Mail: blancoad@paho.org
Phone: +1 202 9743591
Interests: tobacco control policies (health warnings, tobacco advertisement promotion and sponsorship, smoke-free environments); second hand smoke; tobacco industry; tobacco prevention; Smoking cessation, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Protocol on Illicit Trade of tobacco products. Trade and Tobacco)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tobacco epidemic is a major public health problem. It is not only one of the singular leading causes of preventable death and disability, it is also a common risk factor for the main chronic non communicable diseases (NCD) that were responsible in 2008 for 63% of the world mortality (WHO). From the almost 6 million deaths that tobacco causes every year, 600,000 occurred in non-smokers, 47% of them in women and 28% in children.

The WHO Framework Convention in Tobacco Control (FCTC), the first public health treaty negotiated under the auspices of WHO, had been in force since February 2005. As today, more than 170 countries are Parties to it, and are –therefore- legally bound by its measures. Even though new legislation had been enacted in many countries, as a whole, a small part of the world population is covered by WHO FCTC measures.

Data provided by the Global Tobacco Surveillance System shows that figures among youth (13 to 15 years old) do not forecast an improvement of the situation; furthermore girls smoking is growing and in the Region of the Americas had already outpaced boys’ consumption.

Tobacco use also imposes economic burdens on individuals and countries in direct medical costs and indirect costs from reduced productivity so is a factor that increases impoverishment of individuals, households and countries hindering social and economic development.

This special issue is open to any subject area of public health, economics and policy related to the tobacco epidemic. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Adriana Blanco Marquizo
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • tobacco smoking
  • public health
  • smoking cessation, smoking initiation
  • tobacco control policies/interventions
  • tobacco control legislation impact (health, economic)
  • bans on cigarette advertising and promotions
  • tobacco taxation
  • secondhand smoke
  • clean-indoor air laws, public smoking bans, smoke-free environments
  • Framework Convention on Tobacco Control
  • tobacco industry interference
  • economic costs of tobacco use/exposure

Published Papers (6 papers)

Download All Papers
Sort by:
Display options:
Select articles Export citation of selected articles as:
Select/unselect all
Displaying article 1-6
p. 2520-2536
by , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2012, 9(7), 2520-2536; doi:10.3390/ijerph9072520
Received: 4 May 2012; in revised form: 6 July 2012 / Accepted: 12 July 2012 / Published: 23 July 2012
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (131 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
p. 1954-1970
by , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2012, 9(5), 1954-1970; doi:10.3390/ijerph9051954
Received: 18 March 2012; in revised form: 17 April 2012 / Accepted: 19 April 2012 / Published: 21 May 2012
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (179 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
p. 1111-1134
by , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2012, 9(4), 1111-1134; doi:10.3390/ijerph9041111
Received: 21 February 2012; in revised form: 17 March 2012 / Accepted: 19 March 2012 / Published: 27 March 2012
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (347 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
p. 212-222
by  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2012, 9(1), 212-222; doi:10.3390/ijerph9010212
Received: 1 December 2011; in revised form: 4 January 2012 / Accepted: 11 January 2012 / Published: 16 January 2012
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (350 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
p. 4312-4331
by
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(11), 4312-4331; doi:10.3390/ijerph8114312
Received: 14 September 2011; in revised form: 17 October 2011 / Accepted: 20 October 2011 / Published: 17 November 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (709 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
p. 4118-4139
by ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(11), 4118-4139; doi:10.3390/ijerph8114118
Received: 16 September 2011; in revised form: 3 October 2011 / Accepted: 19 October 2011 / Published: 26 October 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (235 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Select/unselect all
Displaying article 1-6
Select articles Export citation of selected articles as:

Last update: 25 February 2014

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert