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Special Issue "Sedentary Behaviour and Health"

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Marieke De Craemer

Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiteit Gent, Watersportlaan 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: physical activity; sedentary behaviour; children; toddlers; preschool children; interventions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) welcomes submissions for a Special Issue of the journal, which will focus on “Sedentary Behaviour and Health”.

Sedentary behaviour has recently emerged as a new focus of research, which is, not only due to modern life, in which sitting has become the dominant posture of most activities, but also because of its associations with different health indicators. In addition, sedentary behaviour is prevalent in all age groups going from (young) children to adolescents, adults and older adults, and it is present in many settings such as the home, the school, the office or passive transportation. As sedentary behaviour is such a recent research topic, several aspects can still be thoroughly investigated. Therefore, manuscripts on following topics (though not limited to them) are welcome to be submitted:

  • Factors influencing sedentary behaviour
  • Interventions targeting sedentary behaviour
  • Various settings (e.g., childcare, school, home, office, retirement home, transport, etc.)
  • Measurement of sedentary behaviour
  • The role of peers, family, teachers, members of the community, etc.

Researchers are invited to contribute novel work to be considered for publication in this Special Issue. Submissions could include original articles, short communications or review articles (systematic review or meta-analyses). There are no restrictions regarding study design and methodology.

Prof. Dr. Marieke De Craemer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sedentary behaviour
  • Interventions
  • Health promotion
  • Measurement
  • Public health
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Adults
  • Older adults
  • Home environment
  • School environment
  • Work environment
  • Influencing factors
  • Correlates
  • Determinants

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Open AccessArticle Reallocating Time from Sedentary Behavior to Light and Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity: What Has a Stronger Association with Adiposity in Older Adult Women?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1444; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071444
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 2 July 2018 / Accepted: 4 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
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Abstract
This study is the first to use compositional data analysis to investigate movement behaviors of elderly women and their relationships with fat mass percentage (FM%). The focus of the study is on the associations of time reallocations from sedentary behavior (SB) to light
[...] Read more.
This study is the first to use compositional data analysis to investigate movement behaviors of elderly women and their relationships with fat mass percentage (FM%). The focus of the study is on the associations of time reallocations from sedentary behavior (SB) to light physical activity (LIPA) or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with adiposity. Over 400 older adult women were recruited as part of the cross-sectionally conducted measurements of older adults aged 60+ in Central European countries. An accelerometer was used to assess daily movement behaviors. Body mass index (BMI) and fat mass percentage (FM%) were assessed as adiposity indicators using InBody 720 MFBIA. Using LS-regression, we found positive relationships of BMI and FM% with SB (relative to remaining movement behaviors) (p < 0.001 for both), while their relationship with MVPA (relative to remaining movement behaviors) were negative (p < 0.001 for both). The estimated BMI and FM% associated with a 30-min SB-to-MVPA reallocation were reduced by 1.5 kg/m2 and 2.2 percentage points, respectively, whereas they were not reduced significantly with the reallocation of 30 min from SB to LIPA. The findings highlight that SB and MVPA, but not LIPA, are significantly associated with adiposity in elderly women. The reallocation of time from SB to MVPA could be advocated in weight loss interventions in older women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication Data on Determinants Are Needed to Curb the Sedentary Epidemic in Europe. Lessons Learnt from the DEDIPAC European Knowledge Hub
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1406; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071406
Received: 5 June 2018 / Revised: 30 June 2018 / Accepted: 2 July 2018 / Published: 4 July 2018
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Abstract
Societal and technological changes have resulted in sitting being the dominant posture during most activities of daily living, such as learning, working, travelling and leisure time. Too much time spent in seated activities, referred to as sedentary behaviour, is a novel concern for
[...] Read more.
Societal and technological changes have resulted in sitting being the dominant posture during most activities of daily living, such as learning, working, travelling and leisure time. Too much time spent in seated activities, referred to as sedentary behaviour, is a novel concern for public health as it is one of the key lifestyle causes of poor health. The European DEDIPAC (Determinants of Diet and Physical Activity) Knowledge Hub coordinated the work of 35 institutions across 12 European member states to investigate the determinants of sedentary behaviour. DEDIPAC reviewed current evidence, set a theoretical framework and harmonised the available epidemiological data. The main results are summarised. The conclusion is that there is a dire lack of data that is exploitable across Europe to inform policy and intervention. There is an urgent need to develop international data collection compliant with FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Re-usable) and standardised surveillance systems for sedentary behaviour. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessArticle Activating Childcare Environments for All Children: the Importance of Children’s Individual Needs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1400; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071400
Received: 14 June 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 29 June 2018 / Published: 3 July 2018
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Abstract
Characteristics of the physical childcare environment are associated with children’s sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA) levels. This study examines whether these associations are moderated by child characteristics. A total of 152 1- to 3-year-old children from 22 Dutch childcare centers participated
[...] Read more.
Characteristics of the physical childcare environment are associated with children’s sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA) levels. This study examines whether these associations are moderated by child characteristics. A total of 152 1- to 3-year-old children from 22 Dutch childcare centers participated in the study. Trained research assistants observed the physical childcare environment, using the Environment and Policy Assessment Observation (EPAO) protocol. Child characteristics (age, gender, temperament and weight status) were assessed using parental questionnaires. Child SB and PA was assessed using Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers. Linear regression analyses including interaction terms were used to examine moderation of associations between the childcare environment and child SB and PA. Natural elements and portable outdoor equipment were associated with less SB and more PA. In addition, older children, boys and heavier children were less sedentary and more active, while more use of childcare and an anxious temperament were associated with more SB. There were various interactions between environmental factors and child characteristics. Specific physical elements (e.g., natural elements) were especially beneficial for vulnerable children (i.e., anxious, overactive, depressive/withdrawn, overweight). The current study shows the importance of the physical childcare environment in lowering SB and promoting PA in very young children in general, and vulnerable children specifically. Moderation by child characteristics shows the urgency of shaping childcare centers that promote PA in all children, increasing equity in PA promotion in childcare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
Open AccessArticle Time Spent in Sedentary Behaviour as Discriminant Criterion for Frailty in Older Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1336; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071336
Received: 11 May 2018 / Revised: 14 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 26 June 2018
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Abstract
This paper aims to analyse whether time spent in sedentary behaviour was a discriminant criterion for frailty in older adults. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a sample of 457 elderly individuals aged ≥60 years. Frailty was defined as the presence of
[...] Read more.
This paper aims to analyse whether time spent in sedentary behaviour was a discriminant criterion for frailty in older adults. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a sample of 457 elderly individuals aged ≥60 years. Frailty was defined as the presence of three or more of the following criteria: Unintentional weight loss, low walking speed at a 4.57 m course, reduced manual grip strength, exhaustion and insufficient physical activity level. Participants were classified into two groups: Non-frail or frail. Exposure to sedentary behaviour was assessed by the time spent sitting during a typical week, according to the adapted version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Descriptive (mean, frequency) and inferential statistics (Poisson regression, Pearson’s Chi-square, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve) were used to analyse the data, comparing them to the time-related areas exposed to sedentary behaviour by gender and the presence of fragility. The prevalence of frailty was 22.1% (n = 101). The most accurate cut-off points of sitting time for predicting frailty were >495 min/day (men) or >536 min/day (women). Time spent in sedentary behaviour can be used to indicate fragility in the elderly of both sexes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessArticle A US/Mexico Study of Joint Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior on Anthropometric Indicators, Migration Status, Country of Birth and Country of Residence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1283; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061283
Received: 15 April 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 17 June 2018
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Abstract
Background: This study examined the influence of migration status, nativity and country of residence on joint associations of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) in anthropometric indicators of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans living in the US and in Mexico. Methods: We examined data
[...] Read more.
Background: This study examined the influence of migration status, nativity and country of residence on joint associations of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) in anthropometric indicators of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans living in the US and in Mexico. Methods: We examined data from two large national surveys, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the US (NHANES, 2011–2012) and Mexico (ENSANUT, 2012). Using self-reported minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity and SB, we calculated four categories for analyses. Anthropometric measures consisted of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). We used data of migration status, nativity and country of residence. Linear regression models examined how joint categories of PA and SB were associated with BMI and WC according to migration status, nativity and country of residence, controlling for health risk behaviors. Results: Analyses showed that even among those in the category with the lowest risk behavior, “physically active and low sedentary”, there were differences in BMI and WC by migration status, nativity and country of residence. Within this lower risk category, Mexican immigrants living in the US had the greatest association with high BMI, while US-born Mexican-Americans living in the US had the highest WC values when compared with the group of Mexicans living in Mexico. Conclusions: Joint categories of PA and SB were associated with BMI and WC by migration status, nativity and country of residence among populations with Mexican ethnicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessArticle Screen Time, Physical Activity and Self-Esteem in Children: The Ulm Birth Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1275; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061275
Received: 11 May 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 16 June 2018
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Abstract
Screen time is a central activity of children’s daily life and jeopardizes mental health. However, results appear inconclusive and are often based on small cross-sectional studies. We aimed to investigate the temporal sequence of the association between screen time and self-esteem taking into
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Screen time is a central activity of children’s daily life and jeopardizes mental health. However, results appear inconclusive and are often based on small cross-sectional studies. We aimed to investigate the temporal sequence of the association between screen time and self-esteem taking into account further indirect effects through family or friendship relationship. In our population-based birth cohort study (baseline November 2000–November 2001, Ulm, Germany), these relationships were explored in n = 519 11- and 13-year-old children and their parents who both provided information on children’s screen time: time spent watching television or videos (TV), time spent on computers, video game consoles, mobile devices, or cell phones; so called “other screen time”, and children’s self-esteem (KINDL-R). Time watching TV (self-reported) at age 11 was negatively associated with girls’ self-esteem at the same age but positively with an increase of self-esteem between age 11 and 13. However, the latter association was restricted to low to moderate TV viewers. In boys, a higher increase of other screen time between age 11 and age 13 was associated with lower self-reported self-esteem at age 13. Additionally, friendship relationship mediated the association between watching TV and self-esteem in girls. For parental reports similar associations were observed. These findings indicate that time sequence and potential mediators need further investigation in cohort studies with multiple assessments of screen time and self-esteem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessCommunication From Evidence-Based Research to Practice-Based Evidence: Disseminating a Web-Based Computer-Tailored Workplace Sitting Intervention through a Health Promotion Organisation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 1049; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15051049
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 18 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
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Abstract
Prolonged sitting has been linked to adverse health outcomes; therefore, we developed and examined a web-based, computer-tailored workplace sitting intervention. As we had previously shown good effectiveness, the next stage was to conduct a dissemination study. This study reports on the dissemination efforts
[...] Read more.
Prolonged sitting has been linked to adverse health outcomes; therefore, we developed and examined a web-based, computer-tailored workplace sitting intervention. As we had previously shown good effectiveness, the next stage was to conduct a dissemination study. This study reports on the dissemination efforts of a health promotion organisation, associated costs, reach achieved, and attributes of the website users. The organisation systematically registered all the time and resources invested to promote the intervention. Website usage statistics (reach) and descriptive statistics (website users’ attributes) were also assessed. Online strategies (promotion on their homepage; sending e-mails, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn posts to professional partners) were the main dissemination methods. The total time investment was 25.6 h, which cost approximately 845 EUR in salaries. After sixteen months, 1599 adults had visited the website and 1500 (93.8%) completed the survey to receive personalized sitting advice. This sample was 38.3 ± 11.0 years, mainly female (76.9%), college/university educated (89.0%), highly sedentary (88.5% sat >8 h/day) and intending to change (93.0%) their sitting. Given the small time and money investment, these outcomes are positive and indicate the potential for wide-scale dissemination. However, more efforts are needed to reach men, non-college/university educated employees, and those not intending behavioural change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessArticle Do Young People Ever Sit Still? Variations in Accelerometer Counts, Muscle Activity and Heart Rate across Various Sedentary Activities in Youth
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 1009; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15051009
Received: 15 March 2018 / Revised: 12 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 17 May 2018
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Abstract
Evidence of adverse health effects of TV viewing is stronger than for overall sedentary behaviour in youth. One explanation may be that TV viewing involves less body movement than other sedentary activities. Variations in body movement across sedentary activities are currently unknown, as
[...] Read more.
Evidence of adverse health effects of TV viewing is stronger than for overall sedentary behaviour in youth. One explanation may be that TV viewing involves less body movement than other sedentary activities. Variations in body movement across sedentary activities are currently unknown, as are age differences in such variations. This study examined body movement differences across various sedentary activities in children and adolescents, assessed by hip-, thigh- and wrist-worn accelerometers, muscle activity and heart rate. Body movement differences between sedentary activities and standing were also examined. Fifty-three children (aged 10–12 years) and 37 adolescents (aged 16–18 years) performed seven different sedentary activities, a standing activity, and a dancing activity (as a control activity) in a controlled setting. Each activity lasted 10 minutes. Participants wore an Actigraph on their hip and both wrists, an activPAL on their thigh and a heart rate monitor. The muscle activity of weight-bearing leg muscles was measured in a subgroup (n = 38) by surface electromyography. Variations in body movement across activities were examined using general estimation equations analysis. Children showed significantly more body movement during sedentary activities and standing than adolescents. In both age groups, screen-based sedentary activities involved less body movement than non-screen-based sedentary activities. This may explain the stronger evidence for detrimental health effects of TV viewing while evidence for child sedentary behaviour in general is inconsistent. Differences in body movement during standing and sedentary activities were relatively small. Future research should examine the potential health effects of differences in body movement between screen-based versus non-screen based and standing versus sedentary activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
Open AccessArticle The Impact of Activity Based Working (ABW) on Workplace Activity, Eating Behaviours, Productivity, and Satisfaction
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 1005; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15051005
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 11 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 17 May 2018
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Abstract
The redesign of the physical workplace according to activity-based working (ABW) principles has potential to influence employee health and workplace outcomes. This natural experiment examined changes in accelerometer-derived workplace activity, self-reported eating behaviours, productivity, workplace satisfaction before (March to November 2014) and six
[...] Read more.
The redesign of the physical workplace according to activity-based working (ABW) principles has potential to influence employee health and workplace outcomes. This natural experiment examined changes in accelerometer-derived workplace activity, self-reported eating behaviours, productivity, workplace satisfaction before (March to November 2014) and six to nine months after moving to an ABW workplace compared to a comparison workplace (n = 146 at baseline (56% ABW, aged 40.1 ± 8.5 years, 72% female). Interviews were also conducted with 21 ABW participants. Between- and within-group differences were examined and mixed model analysis examined intervention effects over time. Effect sizes were calculated on change scores (Cohen’s d). Although not statistically significant, ABW participants had meaningful improvements in workday sedentary time, light-, and moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity, job satisfaction and relationship with co-workers (d = 0.379–0.577), and small declines in productivity (d = 0.278). There were significant, meaningful, and beneficial intervention effects on perceived organisational support for being active in the workplace, frequency of eating lunch with colleagues, and satisfaction with the physical environment in ABW compared to comparison participants (d = 0.501–0.839). Qualitative data suggested that ABW employees associated ABW with greater opportunities for movement and collaboration, but had mixed views on the impact on productivity. Future research with larger samples and over longer follow-up periods is warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Experiences and Opinions of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Regarding a Self-Regulation-Based eHealth Intervention Targeting Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 954; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050954
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 May 2018 / Published: 10 May 2018
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Abstract
Background: Online interventions targeting a healthy lifestyle in adults with type 2 diabetes are more effective when informed by behaviour change theories. Although these theories provide guidance in developing the content of an intervention, information regarding how to present this content in an
[...] Read more.
Background: Online interventions targeting a healthy lifestyle in adults with type 2 diabetes are more effective when informed by behaviour change theories. Although these theories provide guidance in developing the content of an intervention, information regarding how to present this content in an engaging way is often lacking. Consequently, incorporating users’ views in the creation of eHealth interventions has become an important target. Methods: Via a qualitative interview study with 21 adults with type 2 diabetes who had completed an online self-regulation-based intervention (‘MyPlan 2.0’), we assessed participants’ opinions regarding the usefulness of the implemented self-regulation techniques, the design of the programme as well as their knowledge regarding physical activity and sedentary behaviour. A directed content analysis was performed to synthesize the interview data. Results: Participants experienced difficulties completing the coping planning component. The simple design of the website was considered helpful, and most participants were aware of the beneficial effects of an active lifestyle. Conclusions: ‘MyPlan 2.0’ was well-accepted by the majority of participants. However, the coping planning component will need to be adapted. Based on these findings, recommendations on how to tailor eHealth interventions to the population of adults with type 2 diabetes have been formulated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessArticle Sedentary Behaviour in Swiss Children and Adolescents: Disentangling Associations with the Perceived and Objectively Measured Environment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 918; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050918
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 27 April 2018 / Accepted: 3 May 2018 / Published: 4 May 2018
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Abstract
Identifying correlates of sedentary behaviour across all levels of the ecological model and understanding their interrelations is a promising method to plan effective interventions. The present study examined whether the objectively assessed and the perceived neighbourhood are associated with children’s sedentary behaviour time
[...] Read more.
Identifying correlates of sedentary behaviour across all levels of the ecological model and understanding their interrelations is a promising method to plan effective interventions. The present study examined whether the objectively assessed and the perceived neighbourhood are associated with children’s sedentary behaviour time (SBT). A comprehensive set of factors at different levels of influence across the ecological model were taken into account and analysed for mediating and modifying effects. Analyses were based on 1306 children and adolescents (6–16 years) participating in the population-based SOPHYA-study. Accelerometers were used to assess SBT, the perceived environment was examined by a validated parental questionnaire, and objective environmental data were allocated using GIS (ArcMap 10.2, Esri, Redlands, CA, USA) for each family’s residential address. A high perceived safety was associated with less SBT. Boys, those whose residential neighbourhood was characterized by dead ends in urban areas, a low main street density in the neighbourhood of children and greenness were less likely to exhibit SBT. The association of the objective environment with the respective parental perceptions was low and no significant mediating effect was found for the perceived environment. We conclude for land-use planning to reduce sedentary behaviour objective environments should be complemented with efforts to increase parental sense of security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessArticle Common Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Reducing Sedentary Behaviour among Office Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 792; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040792
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 11 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 18 April 2018
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Abstract
Qualitative studies identified barriers and facilitators associated with work-related sedentary behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine common perceived barriers and facilitators among office workers, assess subgroup differences, and describe sedentary behaviour. From two Swedish companies, 547 office workers (41 years
[...] Read more.
Qualitative studies identified barriers and facilitators associated with work-related sedentary behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine common perceived barriers and facilitators among office workers, assess subgroup differences, and describe sedentary behaviour. From two Swedish companies, 547 office workers (41 years (IQR = 35–48), 65% women, 66% highly educated) completed questionnaires on perceived barriers and facilitators, for which subgroup differences in age, gender, education, and workplace sedentary behaviour were assessed. Sedentary behaviour was measured using inclinometers (n = 311). The most frequently reported barrier was sitting is a habit (67%), which was reported more among women than men (Χ2 = 5.14, p = 0.03) and more among highly sedentary office workers (Χ2 = 9.26, p < 0.01). The two other most reported barriers were that standing is uncomfortable (29%) and standing is tiring (24%). Facilitators with the most support were the introduction of either standing- or walking-meetings (respectively 33% and 29%) and more possibilities or reminders for breaks (31%). The proportion spent sedentary was 64% at the workplace, 61% on working days, and 57% on non-working days. This study provides a detailed understanding of office workers’ ideas about sitting and means to reduce sitting. We advise to include the supported facilitators and individualized support in interventions to work towards more effective strategies to reduce sedentary behaviour. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessArticle Domain-Specific Adult Sedentary Behaviour Questionnaire (ASBQ) and the GPAQ Single-Item Question: A Reliability and Validity Study in an Asian Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 739; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040739
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 8 April 2018 / Accepted: 9 April 2018 / Published: 12 April 2018
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Abstract
This study examined the validity and reliability of a domain-specific Adult Sedentary Behaviour Questionnaire (ASBQ) and the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) single-item sitting question using self- and interviewer-administered modes of administration against the triaxial ActiGraph wGT3X-BT accelerometer. The ASBQ and the GPAQ
[...] Read more.
This study examined the validity and reliability of a domain-specific Adult Sedentary Behaviour Questionnaire (ASBQ) and the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) single-item sitting question using self- and interviewer-administered modes of administration against the triaxial ActiGraph wGT3X-BT accelerometer. The ASBQ and the GPAQ were administered twice, seven days apart. Participants were asked to put on the waist-worn accelerometer for seven days. Convergent validity was assessed using Spearman’s rho, mean absolute error (MAE), and Bland-Altman analysis (n = 78). Reliability was assessed using the Spearman’s rho and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (n = 84). Participants were adults aged 20–65 years and identifying as Chinese, Malay, or Indian. Only the self-administered GPAQ was significantly correlated with accelerometry-based measures (rho: 0.46), but not the interviewer-administered version (rho: 0.12). MAE for GPAQ was 207.5–218.3 min/day in relation to the accelerometer and for ASBQ was 154.7–174.6 min/day. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated large limits of agreement between questionnaire and accelerometry-based measures. While the self-administered GPAQ demonstrated a moderate correlation with accelerometry, the mean bias and the limits of agreement were large. The GPAQ (rho: 0.68–0.79; ICC: 0.68–0.78) and the ASBQ (rho: 0.53–0.64; ICC: 0.66–0.74) showed moderate-to-good reliability for total sedentary time using either self- or interviewer-administration. Future research should incorporate accelerometers to generate useful sedentary behaviour measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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Open AccessBrief Report Sedentary Behaviour and Hair Cortisol Amongst Women Living in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040586
Received: 14 February 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 25 March 2018
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Abstract
Women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are at heightened risk of experiencing psychological stress. Therefore, identifying potential risk factors for stress is important to support positive mental health. A growing body of research has linked sedentary behaviour with mental ill-health (e.g., depression and
[...] Read more.
Women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are at heightened risk of experiencing psychological stress. Therefore, identifying potential risk factors for stress is important to support positive mental health. A growing body of research has linked sedentary behaviour with mental ill-health (e.g., depression and anxiety); however, little research has specifically investigated potential linkages between sedentary behaviour and stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between common types of sedentary behaviour and objectively-measured stress (as measured by hair cortisol levels) amongst women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. During 2012–2013, 72 women (aged 18–46 years) living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods self-reported sedentary behaviour (TV viewing, computer use, overall sitting time) and provided hair samples. Hair cortisol levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear regression models examined cross-sectional associations between sedentary behaviour and hair cortisol levels. There was no association between any type of sedentary behaviour (TV viewing, computer use, or overall sitting time) and hair cortisol levels in either crude or adjusted models. Sedentary behaviour may not be linked to hair cortisol level (stress) in women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Further studies utilising objective measures of both sedentary behaviour and stress are required to confirm these findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
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