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Special Issue "Job Stress and Health"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Briana Barocas (Website)

Silver School of Social Work, New York University, 194 Mercer Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10012, USA
Interests: violence and trauma; emergency preparedness and response; disaster mental health in workplace settings; occupational health and safety; work-family balance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Job stress is a global public health phenomenon negatively affecting a growing number of people. It is ubiquitous in different kinds of workplace settings and throughout all strata of society. The stress can impact the physical and psychological well-being of workers and can lead to poor job performance, high work-related accident and injury rates, and reduced productivity. The global economy has become increasingly competitive resulting in more pressure on workers in both industrialized and industrializing countries. Structural and technological changes all contribute to and create new challenges in the workplace and for the workforce. The causes of job stress are now understood to exist within the total sphere of the workplace and to have an impact that reaches beyond the workplace to affect family and community. Promoting the long-term social, economic and physical health of society may depend on the capacity of organizations to develop initiatives to address workplace stress and foster worker well-being. This special issue is focused on job stress with the goal of contributing to the knowledge base of how to reduce, prevent, and manage the stress associated with one's job. Empirical, theoretical, and review papers are welcome. Papers on workplace strategies and interventions for improving employee health and well-being as well as organizational outcomes are especially encouraged.

Dr. Briana Barocas
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • job stress
  • job strain
  • job performance
  • worker health and well-being
  • occupational health and safety
  • changing nature of work
  • burnout
  • work demand
  • organizational effectiveness

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Why Some Employees Adopt or Resist Reorganization of Work Practices in Health Care: Associations between Perceived Loss of Resources, Burnout, and Attitudes to Change
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(1), 187-201; doi:10.3390/ijerph110100187
Received: 5 August 2013 / Revised: 28 November 2013 / Accepted: 29 November 2013 / Published: 20 December 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (229 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, successive work reorganization initiatives have been implemented in many healthcare settings. The failure of many of these change efforts has often been attributed in the prominent management discourse to change resistance. Few studies have paid attention to the temporal [...] Read more.
In recent years, successive work reorganization initiatives have been implemented in many healthcare settings. The failure of many of these change efforts has often been attributed in the prominent management discourse to change resistance. Few studies have paid attention to the temporal process of workers’ resource depletion/accumulation over time and its links with workers’ psychological states and reactions to change. Drawing upon the conservation of resources theory, this study examines associations between workers’ perceptions of loss of resources, burnout, and attitudes to change. The study was conducted in five health and social service centres in Quebec, in units where a work reorganization project was initiated. A prospective longitudinal design was used to assess workers’ perceptions at two time points 12 months apart. Our findings are consistent with the conservation of resources theory. The analysis of latent differences scores between times 1 and 2 showed that the perceived loss of resources was associated with emotional exhaustion, which, in turn, was negatively correlated with commitment to change and positively correlated with cynicism. In confirming the temporal relationship between perceived loss of resources, occupational burnout, and attitude to change, this research offers a new perspective to explain negative and positive reactions to change implementation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Associations of Job Stress Indicators with Oxidative Biomarkers in Japanese Men and Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6662-6671; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126662
Received: 26 July 2013 / Revised: 14 November 2013 / Accepted: 16 November 2013 / Published: 2 December 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (138 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Some researchers have suggested that oxidative damage may be one of the mechanisms linking job stress with coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between job stress indicators and oxidative biomarkers. The study included 567 subjects [...] Read more.
Some researchers have suggested that oxidative damage may be one of the mechanisms linking job stress with coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between job stress indicators and oxidative biomarkers. The study included 567 subjects (272 men, 295 women) who answered questionnaires related to their work and underwent a medical examination. Job stress evaluated using the demands-control-support model was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire. Effort-reward imbalance was measured using the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire. Urinary hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured by the modified ferrous ion oxidation xylenol orange version-1 method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. In men, the changes in the odds ratios for high urinary H2O2 associated with a 1-standard-deviation (SD) increase in worksite social support were 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53, 0.91) univariately and 0.68 (95%CI 0.51, 0.90) after adjustment for covariates. The change in the odds ratio for high urinary H2O2 associated with a 1-SD increase in effort-reward ratio was 1.35 (95% CI 1.03, 1.78) after adjustment for covariates. In women, there were no significant associations of the two job stress indicators with urinary H2O2 and 8-OHdG levels after adjustment for covariates (p > 0.05). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle The Influence of Domestic Overload on the Association between Job Strain and Ambulatory Blood Pressure among Female Nursing Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6397-6408; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126397
Received: 16 July 2013 / Revised: 29 August 2013 / Accepted: 3 September 2013 / Published: 27 November 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (193 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Evidence suggests that the workplace plays an important etiologic role in blood pressure (BP) alterations. Associations in female samples are controversial, and the domestic environment is hypothesized to be an important factor in this relationship. This study assessed the association between job [...] Read more.
Evidence suggests that the workplace plays an important etiologic role in blood pressure (BP) alterations. Associations in female samples are controversial, and the domestic environment is hypothesized to be an important factor in this relationship. This study assessed the association between job strain and BP within a sample of female nursing workers, considering the potential role of domestic overload. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a group of 175 daytime workers who wore an ambulatory BP monitor for 24 h during a working day. Mean systolic and diastolic BP were calculated. Job strain was evaluated using the Demand-Control Model. Domestic overload was based on the level of responsibility in relation to four household tasks and on the number of beneficiaries. After adjustments no significant association between high job strain and BP was detected. Stratified analyses revealed that women exposed to both domestic overload and high job strain had higher systolic BP at home. These results indicate a possible interaction between domestic overload and job strain on BP levels and revealed the importance of domestic work, which is rarely considered in studies of female workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Effects of Habitual Anger on Employees’ Behavior during Organizational Change
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6215-6234; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126215
Received: 16 September 2013 / Revised: 22 October 2013 / Accepted: 23 October 2013 / Published: 25 November 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (663 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organizational change is a particularly emotional event for those being confronted with it. Anger is a frequently experienced emotion under these conditions. This study analyses the influence of employees’ habitual anger reactions on their reported behavior during organizational change. It was explored [...] Read more.
Organizational change is a particularly emotional event for those being confronted with it. Anger is a frequently experienced emotion under these conditions. This study analyses the influence of employees’ habitual anger reactions on their reported behavior during organizational change. It was explored whether anger reactions conducive to recovering or increasing individual well-being will enhance the likelihood of functional change behavior. Dysfunctional regulation strategies in terms of individual well-being are expected to decrease the likelihood of functional change behavior—mediated by the commitment to change. Four hundred and twelve employees of different organizations in Luxembourg undergoing organizational change participated in the study. Findings indicate that the anger regulation strategy venting, and humor increase the likelihood of deviant resistance to change. Downplaying the incident’s negative impact and feedback increase the likelihood of active support for change. The mediating effect of commitment to change has been found for humor and submission. The empirical findings suggest that a differentiated conceptualization of resistance to change is required. Specific implications for practical change management and for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Psychosocial Job Strain and Sleep Quality Interaction Leading to Insufficient Recovery
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5863-5873; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115863
Received: 13 August 2013 / Revised: 29 October 2013 / Accepted: 30 October 2013 / Published: 5 November 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (244 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of job strain and sleep quality on the diurnal pattern of cortisol reactivity, measured by awakening and evening (10 PM) saliva cortisol. The sample consisted of 76 British white-collar workers (24 women, [...] Read more.
The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of job strain and sleep quality on the diurnal pattern of cortisol reactivity, measured by awakening and evening (10 PM) saliva cortisol. The sample consisted of 76 British white-collar workers (24 women, 52 men; mean age 45.8 years). Sleep quality and job strain were assessed in a survey distributed just before the cortisol sampling. Both input variables were dichotomized about the median and factorial ANOVA was used for the statistical analysis. Low sleep quality was significantly associated with lower morning cortisol secretion. While job strain had no main effects on the cortisol reactivity there was a significant interaction effect between the input variables on morning cortisol secretion. These findings tentatively support the hypothesis that lack of sleep for workers with high job strain may result in a flattened diurnal cortisol reactivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Psychological Distress, Related Work Attendance, and Productivity Loss in Small-to-Medium Enterprise Owner/Managers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 5062-5082; doi:10.3390/ijerph10105062
Received: 22 July 2013 / Revised: 4 September 2013 / Accepted: 1 October 2013 / Published: 15 October 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (358 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Owner/managers of small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs) are an under-researched population in terms of psychological distress and the associated health and economic consequences. Using baseline data from the evaluation of the Business in Mind program, a mental health promotion intervention amongst SME owner/managers, this [...] Read more.
Owner/managers of small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs) are an under-researched population in terms of psychological distress and the associated health and economic consequences. Using baseline data from the evaluation of the Business in Mind program, a mental health promotion intervention amongst SME owner/managers, this study investigated: (i) prevalence of high/very high psychological distress, past-month sickness absenteeism and presenteeism days in SME owner/managers; (ii) associated, self-reported lost productivity; and (iii) associations between work, non-work and business-specific factors and work attendance behaviours. In our sample of 217 SME owner/managers 36.8% reported high/very high psychological distress. Of this group 38.7% reported past-month absenteeism, 82.5% reported past-month presenteeism, and those reporting presenteeism were 50% less productive as than usual. Negative binomial regression was used to demonstrate the independent effects of socio-demographic, work-related wellbeing and health-related factors, as well as various individual and business characteristics on continuous measures of absenteeism and presenteeism days. Health-related factors (self-rated health and treatment) were the strongest correlates of higher presenteeism days (p < 0.05). Work-related wellbeing factors (job tension and job satisfaction) were the strongest correlates of higher absenteeism days (p < 0.05). Higher educational attainment, treatment and neuroticism were also correlated with more absenteeism days. SME-specific information about the occurrence of psychological distress, work attendance behaviour, and the variables that influence these decisions, are needed for the development of guidelines for managing psychological distress within this sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Stress, Health and Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Employee and Organizational Commitment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4907-4924; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104907
Received: 7 September 2013 / Revised: 2 October 2013 / Accepted: 3 October 2013 / Published: 11 October 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (288 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study investigates the mediating impact of organizational commitment on the relationship between organizational stressors and employee health and well-being. Data were collected from 401 operator level employees working in business process outsourcing organizations (BPOs) based in New Delhi, India. In this [...] Read more.
This study investigates the mediating impact of organizational commitment on the relationship between organizational stressors and employee health and well-being. Data were collected from 401 operator level employees working in business process outsourcing organizations (BPOs) based in New Delhi, India. In this research several dimensions from ASSET, which is an organizational stress screening tool, were used to measure employee perceptions of stressors, their commitment to the organization, their perception of the organization’s commitment to them, and their health and well-being. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling on AMOS software. Results of the mediation analysis highlight both employee commitment to their organization and their perceptions of the organization’s commitment to them mediate the impact of stressors on physical health and psychological well-being. All indices of the model fit were found to be above standard norms. Implications are discussed with the view to improving standards of health and well-being within the call center industry, which is a sector that has reported higher turnover rates and poor working conditions among its employees internationally. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Workplace Bullying among Healthcare Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3121-3139; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083121
Received: 6 May 2013 / Revised: 28 June 2013 / Accepted: 16 July 2013 / Published: 24 July 2013
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (249 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th [...] Read more.
This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th European Working Conditions Survey, conducted in 2010 by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. In light of these objectives, we collected a subsample of 284 health professionals, some of them from the International Standard Classification of Occupations—subgroup 22—(ISCO-08). The results indicated that the chance of a healthcare worker referring to him/herself as bullied increases among those who work on a shift schedule, perform monotonous and rotating tasks, suffer from work stress, enjoy little satisfaction from their working conditions, and do not perceive opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes within the usual course of events that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist human resource managers in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among healthcare workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Circulating Nitrite and Nitrate are Associated with Job-Related Fatigue in Women, but not in Men
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2813-2824; doi:10.3390/ijerph10072813
Received: 29 May 2013 / Revised: 23 June 2013 / Accepted: 26 June 2013 / Published: 5 July 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (225 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A recent study indicated that serum nitrite and nitrate (NOx) is inversely associated with general fatigue. The purpose of this study was to confirm the negative association between nitric oxide (NO) and fatigue and to examine whether NO can prevent [...] Read more.
A recent study indicated that serum nitrite and nitrate (NOx) is inversely associated with general fatigue. The purpose of this study was to confirm the negative association between nitric oxide (NO) and fatigue and to examine whether NO can prevent fatigue caused by job strain. The subjects, 570 workers (272 men and 298 women), answered self-administered questionnaires and underwent a medical examination. Job strain was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire. Fatigue was evaluated using the Profile of Mood States. Venous blood samples were collected after overnight fasting. Plasma NOx concentration was determined by the ozone-based chemiluminescence assay. Plasma NOx levels were significantly (p < 0.05) negatively associated with fatigue even after adjustment for job strain and potential confounders in women, but not in men. Significant (p < 0.05) interactions showed that, in women, as the level of the job strain worsened, fatigue was exacerbated, but the plasma NOx seemed to buffer the association, even after adjustment for potential confounders and the interaction between job strain and vegetable intake. In women, NO seemed to be inversely associated with fatigue and to buffer the association between job strain and fatigue, but not in men. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Generational Differences in Work-Family Conflict and Synergy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(6), 2544-2559; doi:10.3390/ijerph10062544
Received: 26 April 2013 / Revised: 31 May 2013 / Accepted: 4 June 2013 / Published: 19 June 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (327 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines differences in work-family conflict and synergy among the four generational groups represented in the contemporary workforce: Generation Y Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Matures using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 3,502). [...] Read more.
This paper examines differences in work-family conflict and synergy among the four generational groups represented in the contemporary workforce: Generation Y Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Matures using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 3,502). Significant generational differences were found for work-family conflict (work interfering with family and family interfering with work) but not for work-family synergy. Mental health and job pressure were the best predictors of work interfering with family conflict for each generational group. Work-family synergy presented a more complex picture. Work-family conflict and synergy were significantly related to job, marital, and life satisfaction. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
Open AccessArticle Stress, Depression and Coping among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(5), 1815-1830; doi:10.3390/ijerph10051815
Received: 6 March 2013 / Revised: 18 April 2013 / Accepted: 22 April 2013 / Published: 3 May 2013
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (216 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Research shows that one in four migrant farmworkers experienced an episode of one or more mental health disorders such as stress, depression, or anxiety in their lifetime. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore experiences and perceptions related to [...] Read more.
Research shows that one in four migrant farmworkers experienced an episode of one or more mental health disorders such as stress, depression, or anxiety in their lifetime. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore experiences and perceptions related to stress and depression among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs), and to identify their coping behaviors for dealing with these mental health conditions. Using a mixed methods research approach, three focus group interviews of a sample of Latino MSFWs (N = 29) were conducted and a quantitative survey was implemented (N = 57) at community sites in eastern North Carolina. Four major themes emerged from the focus group data: (1) physical stress related to working conditions; (2) mental stress related to family situations, work environment, documentation status, and lack of resources; (3) depression related to separation from family and the lack of resources; and (4) use of positive and negative mechanisms for coping with stress and depression. A discussion of these themes, results from the survey findings, implications for intervention and outreach programs, along with recommendations for further research, are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Burnout in Relation to Specific Contributing Factors and Health Outcomes among Nurses: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(6), 2214-2240; doi:10.3390/ijerph10062214
Received: 1 March 2013 / Revised: 16 May 2013 / Accepted: 24 May 2013 / Published: 31 May 2013
Cited by 31 | PDF Full-text (367 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nurses have been found to experience higher levels of stress-related burnout compared to other health care professionals. Despite studies showing that both job satisfaction and burnout are effects of exposure to stressful working environments, leading to poor health among nurses, little is [...] Read more.
Nurses have been found to experience higher levels of stress-related burnout compared to other health care professionals. Despite studies showing that both job satisfaction and burnout are effects of exposure to stressful working environments, leading to poor health among nurses, little is known about the causal nature and direction of these relationships. The aim of this systematic review is to identify published research that has formally investigated relationships between these variables. Six databases (including CINAHL, COCHRANE, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PROQUEST and PsyINFO) were searched for combinations of keywords, a manual search was conducted and an independent reviewer was asked to cross validate all the electronically identified articles. Of the eighty five articles that were identified from these databases, twenty one articles were excluded based on exclusion criteria; hence, a total of seventy articles were included in the study sample. The majority of identified studies exploring two and three way relationships (n = 63) were conducted in developed countries. Existing research includes predominantly cross-sectional studies (n = 68) with only a few longitudinal studies (n = 2); hence, the evidence base for causality is still very limited. Despite minimal availability of research concerning the small number of studies to investigate the relationships between work-related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and the general health of nurses, this review has identified some contradictory evidence for the role of job satisfaction. This emphasizes the need for further research towards understanding causality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Job Stress and Health)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Article Type: Research article
Title:
Sleep Quality and Job Strain Interact to Predict Diurnal Cortisol Secretion
Authors:
Leif W. Rydstedt 1, Mark Cropley 2 and Jason J. Devereux 3
Affiliation:
1 Lillehammer University College (HiL), ASV, Norway; E-Mail: leif.rydstedt@hil.no
2
School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK
3 Business Psychology Unit, UCL, London, UK
Abstract:
Purpose: To analyze if sleep quality and job strain was related to the diurnal pattern of cortisol reactivity, measured as the mean difference between awakening and evening (10PM) measures of saliva cortisol over a full work week cycle.
Design:
Sleep quality, using the PSQI, and job strain, using a modified version of the JCQ, were assessed for each work day using a self-report diary. Both input variables were dichotomized at the median and the differences between morning and evening saliva cortisol for a full week (7 measures) were use as outcome. Mixed model ANOVA was used for the statistical analysis. The sample consisted of 76 British white-collar workers (24 women, 52 men; mean age 45.8 years).
Results
: Lower perceived sleep quality was significantly associated with a lower difference between morning and evening cortisol secretion (F=5.20; p<.05). While job strain had no main effect on the diurnal pattern of cortisol reactivity there was a significant interaction effect between the input variables (F=4.08; p<.05), indicating that participants with low sleep quality and high job strain had the smallest difference between morning and evening cortisol over the week. There was a strong within variation of cortisol reactivity over the week cycle (F=11.22; p<.001) with a marked drop of morning-evening difference over the weekend. There where although no within X between interactions.
Limitation
: Morning cortisol was not assessed by the full Cortisol Awakening Response.
Research
: These findings support the hypothesis that lack of sleep particularly among white collar workers with high long-term job strain may result in an altered diurnal cortisol secretion pattern between morning and evening cortisol reactivity.
Value
: The study was based on both morning and evening cortisol readings taken over a full work week.

Article Type: Research Article
Title
: Stress, Health and Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Employee and Organizational Commitment
Authors:
Ajay K Jain 1, Sabir I Giga 2 and Cary L. Cooper 3
Affiliation:
1 Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Aarhus University, Denmark; E-mail: ajay@psy.au.dk
2
School of Health Studies, University of Bradford, UK; E-mail: s.giga@bradford.ac.uk
3
Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster University, UK; E-mail: c.cooper1@lancaster.ac.uk
Abstract: This study investigates the mediating impact of commitment in the relationship between organizational stressors and health and wellbeing. Data were collected from 401 operator level employees working in business process outsourcing organizations (BPOs) based in New Delhi, India. In this research several dimensions of ASSET (Cartwright and Cooper, 2002), which is an Organizational Stress Screening Tool, were used to measure employee perceptions of stressors, their commitment to the organization, their perception of the organizations commitment to them, and health and wellbeing.
Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling on AMOS software. Results of the mediation analysis highlight both employee commitment to their organization and their perception of the organization’s commitment to them mediates the impact of stressors on physical health and psychological well-being. All indices of the model fit were found to be above standard norms. Implications are discussed with the view to improving standards of health and well-being within the call center industry, which is a sector that is suffering with high turnover rates and other physical and psychological problems among its employees internationally.

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