Special Issue "Job Stress and Health"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Briana Barocas
Silver School of Social Work, New York University, 194 Mercer Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10012, USA
Website: http://www.nyu.edu/socialwork/our.faculty/briana.barocas.html
E-Mail: briana.barocas@nyu.edu
Interests: violence and trauma; emergency preparedness and response; disaster mental health in workplace settings; occupational health and safety; work-family balance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Job stress is a global public health phenomenon negatively affecting a growing number of people. It is ubiquitous in different kinds of workplace settings and throughout all strata of society. The stress can impact the physical and psychological well-being of workers and can lead to poor job performance, high work-related accident and injury rates, and reduced productivity. The global economy has become increasingly competitive resulting in more pressure on workers in both industrialized and industrializing countries. Structural and technological changes all contribute to and create new challenges in the workplace and for the workforce. The causes of job stress are now understood to exist within the total sphere of the workplace and to have an impact that reaches beyond the workplace to affect family and community. Promoting the long-term social, economic and physical health of society may depend on the capacity of organizations to develop initiatives to address workplace stress and foster worker well-being. This special issue is focused on job stress with the goal of contributing to the knowledge base of how to reduce, prevent, and manage the stress associated with one's job. Empirical, theoretical, and review papers are welcome. Papers on workplace strategies and interventions for improving employee health and well-being as well as organizational outcomes are especially encouraged.

Dr. Briana Barocas
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • job stress
  • job strain
  • job performance
  • worker health and well-being
  • occupational health and safety
  • changing nature of work
  • burnout
  • work demand
  • organizational effectiveness

Published Papers (12 papers)

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(1), 187-201; doi:10.3390/ijerph110100187
Received: 5 August 2013; in revised form: 28 November 2013 / Accepted: 29 November 2013 / Published: 20 December 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6662-6671; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126662
Received: 26 July 2013; in revised form: 14 November 2013 / Accepted: 16 November 2013 / Published: 2 December 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6397-6408; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126397
Received: 16 July 2013; in revised form: 29 August 2013 / Accepted: 3 September 2013 / Published: 27 November 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6215-6234; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126215
Received: 16 September 2013; in revised form: 22 October 2013 / Accepted: 23 October 2013 / Published: 25 November 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5863-5873; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115863
Received: 13 August 2013; in revised form: 29 October 2013 / Accepted: 30 October 2013 / Published: 5 November 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 5062-5082; doi:10.3390/ijerph10105062
Received: 22 July 2013; in revised form: 4 September 2013 / Accepted: 1 October 2013 / Published: 15 October 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4907-4924; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104907
Received: 7 September 2013; in revised form: 2 October 2013 / Accepted: 3 October 2013 / Published: 11 October 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3121-3139; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083121
Received: 6 May 2013; in revised form: 28 June 2013 / Accepted: 16 July 2013 / Published: 24 July 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2813-2824; doi:10.3390/ijerph10072813
Received: 29 May 2013; in revised form: 23 June 2013 / Accepted: 26 June 2013 / Published: 5 July 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(6), 2544-2559; doi:10.3390/ijerph10062544
Received: 26 April 2013; in revised form: 31 May 2013 / Accepted: 4 June 2013 / Published: 19 June 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(6), 2214-2240; doi:10.3390/ijerph10062214
Received: 1 March 2013; in revised form: 16 May 2013 / Accepted: 24 May 2013 / Published: 31 May 2013
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(5), 1815-1830; doi:10.3390/ijerph10051815
Received: 6 March 2013; in revised form: 18 April 2013 / Accepted: 22 April 2013 / Published: 3 May 2013
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Article Type: Research article
Title:
Sleep Quality and Job Strain Interact to Predict Diurnal Cortisol Secretion
Authors:
Leif W. Rydstedt 1, Mark Cropley 2 and Jason J. Devereux 3
Affiliation:
1 Lillehammer University College (HiL), ASV, Norway; E-Mail: leif.rydstedt@hil.no
2
School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK
3 Business Psychology Unit, UCL, London, UK
Abstract:
Purpose: To analyze if sleep quality and job strain was related to the diurnal pattern of cortisol reactivity, measured as the mean difference between awakening and evening (10PM) measures of saliva cortisol over a full work week cycle.
Design:
Sleep quality, using the PSQI, and job strain, using a modified version of the JCQ, were assessed for each work day using a self-report diary. Both input variables were dichotomized at the median and the differences between morning and evening saliva cortisol for a full week (7 measures) were use as outcome. Mixed model ANOVA was used for the statistical analysis. The sample consisted of 76 British white-collar workers (24 women, 52 men; mean age 45.8 years).
Results
: Lower perceived sleep quality was significantly associated with a lower difference between morning and evening cortisol secretion (F=5.20; p<.05). While job strain had no main effect on the diurnal pattern of cortisol reactivity there was a significant interaction effect between the input variables (F=4.08; p<.05), indicating that participants with low sleep quality and high job strain had the smallest difference between morning and evening cortisol over the week. There was a strong within variation of cortisol reactivity over the week cycle (F=11.22; p<.001) with a marked drop of morning-evening difference over the weekend. There where although no within X between interactions.
Limitation
: Morning cortisol was not assessed by the full Cortisol Awakening Response.
Research
: These findings support the hypothesis that lack of sleep particularly among white collar workers with high long-term job strain may result in an altered diurnal cortisol secretion pattern between morning and evening cortisol reactivity.
Value
: The study was based on both morning and evening cortisol readings taken over a full work week.

Article Type: Research Article
Title
: Stress, Health and Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Employee and Organizational Commitment
Authors:
Ajay K Jain 1, Sabir I Giga 2 and Cary L. Cooper 3
Affiliation:
1 Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Aarhus University, Denmark; E-mail: ajay@psy.au.dk
2
School of Health Studies, University of Bradford, UK; E-mail: s.giga@bradford.ac.uk
3
Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster University, UK; E-mail: c.cooper1@lancaster.ac.uk
Abstract: This study investigates the mediating impact of commitment in the relationship between organizational stressors and health and wellbeing. Data were collected from 401 operator level employees working in business process outsourcing organizations (BPOs) based in New Delhi, India. In this research several dimensions of ASSET (Cartwright and Cooper, 2002), which is an Organizational Stress Screening Tool, were used to measure employee perceptions of stressors, their commitment to the organization, their perception of the organizations commitment to them, and health and wellbeing.
Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling on AMOS software. Results of the mediation analysis highlight both employee commitment to their organization and their perception of the organization’s commitment to them mediates the impact of stressors on physical health and psychological well-being. All indices of the model fit were found to be above standard norms. Implications are discussed with the view to improving standards of health and well-being within the call center industry, which is a sector that is suffering with high turnover rates and other physical and psychological problems among its employees internationally.

Last update: 15 April 2013

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