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Special Issue "Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Economics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Johan Jarl (Website)

Division of Health Economics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö Lund University, Box 117, 221 00 Lund, Sweden
Interests: health economics; economics of health behaviour; economics of alcohol consumption; economic evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Alcohol and tobacco are among the leading causes for global ill health, both in terms of morbidity and mortality. Tobacco and alcohol consumption do not only cause harm to the consumer itself, but it is often extended to others around the consumer and to society itself. This is perhaps most pronounced in the case of alcohol consumption with major negative outcomes due to crime.

Being life style factors, the burden caused by alcohol and tobacco are fully avoidable over time. However, it is generally not considered feasible to abolish consumption altogether. Given a situation with continued consumption the question then becomes, at least for a foreseeable future; what can we do to reduce the negative consequences?

There are a multitude of interventions and policy responses to this question, some with a focus of reducing overall consumption and others with a focus on mitigating harm. However, in order to use available resources wisely and to be able to prioritise between potential interventions, detailed information is needed on both the outcomes and the costs, and the relation between the two. This is the focus of the current Special Issue on the Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms; developing knowledge on the economic consequences of prevention, on both the cost and the benefit side, in order to reduce societal as well as individual burden caused by these substances.

Empirical, theoretical and review papers are equally welcome, on any topic relevant to Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms. Submissions on prevention of harm-to-others are especially encouraged as well as studies focusing on under researched areas.

Dr. Johan Jarl
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • economics
  • alcohol consumption
  • tobacco consumption
  • prevention
  • intervention
  • avoidable cost
  • economic evaluation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Did We Get Our Money’s Worth? Bridging Economic and Behavioral Measures of Program Success in Adolescent Drug Prevention
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5908-5935; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115908
Received: 20 September 2013 / Revised: 25 October 2013 / Accepted: 28 October 2013 / Published: 8 November 2013
PDF Full-text (234 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The recent U.S. Congressional mandate for creating drug-free learning environments in elementary and secondary schools stipulates that education reform rely on accountability, parental and community involvement, local decision making, and use of evidence-based drug prevention programs. By necessity, this charge has been [...] Read more.
The recent U.S. Congressional mandate for creating drug-free learning environments in elementary and secondary schools stipulates that education reform rely on accountability, parental and community involvement, local decision making, and use of evidence-based drug prevention programs. By necessity, this charge has been paralleled by increased interest in demonstrating that drug prevention programs net tangible benefits to society. One pressing concern is precisely how to integrate traditional scientific methods of program evaluation with economic measures of “cost efficiency”. The languages and methods of each respective discipline don’t necessarily converge on how to establish the true benefits of drug prevention. This article serves as a primer for conducting economic analyses of school-based drug prevention programs. The article provides the reader with a foundation in the relevant principles, methodologies, and benefits related to conducting economic analysis. Discussion revolves around how economists value the potential costs and benefits, both financial and personal, from implementing school-based drug prevention programs targeting youth. Application of heterogeneous costing methods coupled with widely divergent program evaluation findings influences the feasibility of these techniques and may hinder utilization of these practices. Determination of cost-efficiency should undoubtedly become one of several markers of program success and contribute to the ongoing debate over health policy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms)
Open AccessArticle Does Increasing Community and Liquor Licensees’ Awareness, Police Activity, and Feedback Reduce Alcohol-Related Violent Crime? A Benefit-Cost Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5490-5506; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115490
Received: 15 August 2013 / Revised: 24 September 2013 / Accepted: 29 September 2013 / Published: 28 October 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (237 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Approximately half of all alcohol-related crime is violent crime associated with heavy episodic drinking. Multi-component interventions are highly acceptable to communities and may be effective in reducing alcohol-related crime generally, but their impact on alcohol-related violent crime has not been examined. This [...] Read more.
Approximately half of all alcohol-related crime is violent crime associated with heavy episodic drinking. Multi-component interventions are highly acceptable to communities and may be effective in reducing alcohol-related crime generally, but their impact on alcohol-related violent crime has not been examined. This study evaluated the impact and benefit-cost of a multi-component intervention (increasing community and liquor licensees’ awareness, police activity, and feedback) on crimes typically associated with alcohol-related violence. The intervention was tailored to weekends identified as historically problematic in 10 experimental communities in NSW, Australia, relative to 10 control ones. There was no effect on alcohol-related assaults and a small, but statistically significant and cost-beneficial, effect on alcohol-related sexual assaults: a 64% reduction in in the experimental relative to control communities, equivalent to five fewer alcohol-related sexual assaults, with a net social benefit estimated as AUD$3,938,218. The positive benefit-cost ratio was primarily a function of the value that communities placed on reducing alcohol-related harm: the intervention would need to be more than twice as effective for its economic benefits to be comparable to its costs. It is most likely that greater reductions in crimes associated with alcohol-related violence would be achieved by a combination of complementary legislative and community-based interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms)
Open AccessArticle New York Tobacco Control Program Cessation Assistance: Costs, Benefits, and Effectiveness
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(3), 1037-1047; doi:10.3390/ijerph10031037
Received: 8 January 2013 / Revised: 27 February 2013 / Accepted: 6 March 2013 / Published: 13 March 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (276 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Tobacco use and cigarette smoking have long been causally linked to a wide variety of poor health outcomes, resulting in a number of public health policy initiatives to reduce prevalence and consumption. Benefits of these initiatives, however, have not been well-established quantitatively. [...] Read more.
Tobacco use and cigarette smoking have long been causally linked to a wide variety of poor health outcomes, resulting in a number of public health policy initiatives to reduce prevalence and consumption. Benefits of these initiatives, however, have not been well-established quantitatively. Using 2005–2008 New York Adult Tobacco Survey data, we developed a simulation model to estimate the effectiveness and net benefits of the New York Tobacco Control Program’s (NY TCP’s) adult smoking cessation assistance initiatives, specifically media campaigns, telephone quitline counseling, and nicotine replacement therapy. In 2008, we estimate that NY TCP generated an estimated 49,195 additional, non-relapsing adult quits (95% CI: 19,878; 87,561) for a net benefit of over $800 million (95% CI: $211 million; $1,575 million). Although the simulation results varied considerably, reflecting uncertainty in the estimates and data, and data sufficient to establish definite causality are lacking, the cessation initiatives examined appear to yield substantial societal benefits. These benefits are of sufficient magnitude to fully offset expenditures not only on these initiatives, but on NY TCP as a whole. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms)

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview Economic Rationality in Choosing between Short-Term Bad-Health Choices and Longer-Term Good-Health Choices
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5971-5988; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115971
Received: 28 September 2013 / Revised: 31 October 2013 / Accepted: 1 November 2013 / Published: 8 November 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (295 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Non-contagious, chronic disease has been identified as a global health risk. Poor lifestyle choices, such as smoking, alcohol, drug and solvent abuse, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet have been identified as important factors affecting the increasing incidence of chronic disease. The following [...] Read more.
Non-contagious, chronic disease has been identified as a global health risk. Poor lifestyle choices, such as smoking, alcohol, drug and solvent abuse, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet have been identified as important factors affecting the increasing incidence of chronic disease. The following focuses on the circumstance affecting the lifestyle or behavioral choices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in remote-/very remote Australia. Poor behavioral choices are the result of endogenous characteristics that are influenced by a range of stressful exogenous variables making up the psychosocial determinants including social disenfranchisement, cultural loss, insurmountable tasks, the loss of volitional control and resource constraints. It is shown that poor behavioral choices can be economically rational; especially under highly stressful conditions. Stressful circumstances erode individual capacity to commit to long-term positive health alternatives such as self-investment in education. Policies directed at removing the impediments and providing incentives to behaviors involving better health choices can lead to reductions in smoking and alcohol consumption and improved health outcomes. Multijurisdictional culturally acceptable policies directed at distal variables relating to the psychosocial determinants of health and personal mastery and control can be cost effective. While the content of this paper is focused on the conditions of colonized peoples, it has broader relevance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessConcept Paper The Effectiveness of Drinking and Driving Policies for Different Alcohol-Related Fatalities: A Quantile Regression Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4628-4644; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104628
Received: 17 July 2013 / Revised: 5 September 2013 / Accepted: 13 September 2013 / Published: 27 September 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (312 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To understand the impact of drinking and driving laws on drinking and driving fatality rates, this study explored the different effects these laws have on areas with varying severity rates for drinking and driving. Unlike previous studies, this study employed quantile regression [...] Read more.
To understand the impact of drinking and driving laws on drinking and driving fatality rates, this study explored the different effects these laws have on areas with varying severity rates for drinking and driving. Unlike previous studies, this study employed quantile regression analysis. Empirical results showed that policies based on local conditions must be used to effectively reduce drinking and driving fatality rates; that is, different measures should be adopted to target the specific conditions in various regions. For areas with low fatality rates (low quantiles), people’s habits and attitudes toward alcohol should be emphasized instead of transportation safety laws because “preemptive regulations” are more effective. For areas with high fatality rates (or high quantiles), “ex-post regulations” are more effective, and impact these areas approximately 0.01% to 0.05% more than they do areas with low fatality rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Prevention of Alcohol and Tobacco Related Harms)

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