Special Issue "Wound Care"

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A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2015

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Zena Moore
Professor & Head of the School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 123 St Stephens Green, Dublin 2, Ireland
Website: http://www.rcsi.ie/index.jsp?a=885&n=226&p=142
E-Mail: zmoore@rcsi.ie
Interests: wound healing and tissue repair; pressure ulcer prevention and management; quantitative research methods; design, conduct and analysis of clinical trials; epidemiology; clinical nurse specialists; evidence based practice; research implementation; systematic reviews; quality of life; health economics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wounds and the many associated problems have challenged health care providers for centuries and today, despite the wealth of knowledge available, neither the incidence nor prevalence of wounds is reducing. Furthermore, in view of our changing demographic profile and the projected increase in the older population, it is likely that wound management will become an ever increasing burden to the individual, health care services and society as a whole. The annual incidence of wounds in the EU-27 is approximately 4 million, and between 25% and 50% of acute hospital beds are occupied by patients with a wound, with up to 60% of these representing non-healing wounds (infected surgical wounds, pressure ulcers, leg/foot ulcers) The increasing prevalence and incidence of non-wounds healing is closely linked with quality of care and, as such, these rising figures reduce society’s confidence in the health service’s ability to deliver care that is timely, appropriate and effective. Thus, for those involved in this specialist area of clinical practice, the fundamental goal is to improve clinical outcomes, reduce the burden of wounds and improve health related quality of life.

Prof. Zena Moore
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • wound care
  • pressure ulcer
  • diabetic foot ulcer
  • leg ulcer
  • non-healing wound
  • health related quality of life
  • cost effectiveness

Published Papers (10 papers)

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p. 445-467
by  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(4), 445-467; doi:10.3390/healthcare2040445
Received: 1 July 2014; in revised form: 18 September 2014 / Accepted: 30 September 2014 / Published: 27 October 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 417-428
by , , , ,  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(4), 417-428; doi:10.3390/healthcare2040417
Received: 19 June 2014; in revised form: 28 August 2014 / Accepted: 22 September 2014 / Published: 30 September 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 401-416
by , ,  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(3), 401-416; doi:10.3390/healthcare2030401
Received: 13 May 2014; in revised form: 1 August 2014 / Accepted: 4 September 2014 / Published: 19 September 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 356-400
by  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(3), 356-400; doi:10.3390/healthcare2030356
Received: 26 May 2014; in revised form: 8 July 2014 / Accepted: 19 August 2014 / Published: 10 September 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 346-355
by  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(3), 346-355; doi:10.3390/healthcare2030346
Received: 13 May 2014; in revised form: 10 July 2014 / Accepted: 26 August 2014 / Published: 5 September 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 324-337
by ,  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(3), 324-337; doi:10.3390/healthcare2030324
Received: 16 April 2014; in revised form: 18 August 2014 / Accepted: 22 August 2014 / Published: 4 September 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 315-323
by ,  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(3), 315-323; doi:10.3390/healthcare2030315
Received: 18 June 2014; in revised form: 2 August 2014 / Accepted: 15 August 2014 / Published: 27 August 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 299-314
by , , , ,  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(3), 299-314; doi:10.3390/healthcare2030299
Received: 18 March 2014; in revised form: 3 July 2014 / Accepted: 10 July 2014 / Published: 25 July 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 272-281
by
Healthcare 2014, 2(3), 272-281; doi:10.3390/healthcare2030272
Received: 31 March 2014; in revised form: 10 June 2014 / Accepted: 2 July 2014 / Published: 21 July 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Care)
p. 183-191
by , , , , , ,  and
Healthcare 2014, 2(2), 183-191; doi:10.3390/healthcare2020183
Received: 13 January 2014; in revised form: 3 March 2014 / Accepted: 21 March 2014 / Published: 8 April 2014
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Review
Title: Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction
Authors:
Miss S Das Mohapatra DNB, FRCS; Locum Consultant Colorectal Surgeon, St George’s Hospital NHS Trust, London SW17 0QT; E-Mail: mittydm@yahoo.com; Alastair C Windsor MD, FRCS; Consultant Colorectal Surgeon, UCLH, London NW1 2B; E-Mail: alwindsor@aol.com
Abstract:
Abdominal wall defects arise as a result of one or more missing component layers of the abdominal wall. A multiplicity of surgical procedures are associated with complex, recurrent abdominal wall defects, which can occur as a result of failed endeavor at previous repair, trauma, infection, radiation, necrosis, or malignancy. In the acute setting post operative open abdominal wound also poses a significant challenge. There has been a balanced increase in availability of a variety of synthetic materials and biological meshes for the repair of such defects. The use of prosthetic materials is now being replaced by the biologic mesh due to the perceived reduction in infection, recurrence and mesh extrusion rates. This review discusses the pros and cons of the currently available reconstruction options for such complex defects in the abdominal wall.

Title: The application of bactericidal silver nanoparticles in wound treatment systems
Authors:
Geewoo Nam and Joon Myong Song*
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, South Korea
Abstract:
Even with the high level of prevalence of wounds, the medical technology of efficiently managing skin damage is still primitive. Wound healing is a complex and significant process of the human body. An immeasurable number of cellular and chemical actions are involved in the multi-phased restoration. Disruption of any of these processes may present problems for the time-sensitive healing of the skin. Bacterial infection is one of the major obstacles of proper wound healing that may compromise the health of the patient. Thus, the use of antibacterial activity in wound management systems is imperative in keeping the wound bacteria-free. Silver has been used historically to treat wounds for their bactericidal properties to treat wounds. More specifically, Silver nanoparticles have been reported for their enhanced antibacterial activity. This review explores the application of various types of silver nanoparticles in wound treatments

Last update: 18 November 2014

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