Special Issue "Geotourism"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Rannveig Ólafsdóttir

Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: physical geography; geomorphology, tourism and environment; sustainable tourism; geotourism, tourism spatial planning; environmental management; public participation; geographical information system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In past years, international tourist arrivals seem to be hitting a new record, every year, which is likely to continue in the near future. Increased numbers of airlines, and subsequently increased competition, have reduced travel costs and made travel to places that were previously difficult to reach more easily accessible. Thus, many places that depict special geological heritage and history are, today, more accessible than ever, and subsequently attract more visitors looking for new experiences and exotic destinations.

Within the field of tourism, geotourism is one of the most recent concepts, primarily focusing on geological and geomorphological features in landscapes to attract tourists. This new niche segment within tourism is based on conservation of geoheritage and geodiversity through appropriate sustainability measures and management. Geotourism is, however, a broad concept, including many aspects of tourism activities, such as transport, accommodation, services, recreation, planning, and management. Emphasizing the fast growth of geotourism worldwide is the growth of the UNESCO Global Geoparks Network, from 20 geoparks when it was founded in 2004, up to 127 in 2017. Concurrent with the growth of geotourism, scientific publications on issues related to the subject have increased intensely over the past few years. However, the major focus on geotourism as an economic driver is generally with respect to rural development.

Geotourism is expected to continue to grow rapidly worldwide, stressing the critical importance of increased understanding and knowledge on its various impacts from a broader perspective. The concept of geotourism covers the theories and practicalities involved in managing geologically-precious attractions. Therefore, more integrated studies from different disciplines related to geology, geography, geomorphology and tourism are needed. The topic of geotourism is, thus, well worth the concentrated attention of a Special Issue. In putting together this Special Issue, we are particularly interested in understanding how geotourism has evolved over time; future challenges of geotourism; geoconservation management; sustainable management of geotourism; geotourism spatial planning and design; tourism impact at different types of geological sites; geotourism in relation to geological hazards and  geomorphological changes; geotourism and public perception; geotourists as a market niche; and geotourist behaviour.

Prof. Rannveig Ólafsdóttir
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • geotourism
  • geoheritage
  • geoconservation
  • geodiversity
  • geology
  • geomorphology
  • geotourism spatial planning
  • sustainable geotourism management
  • geotourists behaviour

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Geotourism and Local Development Based on Geological and Mining Sites Utilization, Zaruma-Portovelo, Ecuador
Geosciences 2018, 8(6), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8060205
Received: 8 May 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 6 June 2018
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Abstract
This study offers a detailed assessment of the geosites and mining sites present in the Zaruma-Portovelo mining district (Ecuador) through their qualitative and quantitative assessment. It shows up the potentiality of this area taking advantage of its geological-mining heritage. The methodological process includes:
[...] Read more.
This study offers a detailed assessment of the geosites and mining sites present in the Zaruma-Portovelo mining district (Ecuador) through their qualitative and quantitative assessment. It shows up the potentiality of this area taking advantage of its geological-mining heritage. The methodological process includes: (i) compilation and inventory of all the sites within the study area with particular geological or mining interest; (ii) preparation of reports and thematic cartography, (iii) assessment and classification of the elements of geological-mining interest; (iv) SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis and TOWS (Threats, Opportunities, Weaknesses, Strengths) matrix preparation seeking strategies to guarantee the viability of geotourism. A total of 16 sites of geological interest and 11 of mining interest were identified. The 77% of these sites was proved to be of high and very high interest in scientific terms. Likewise, their susceptibility to degradation assessed from their vulnerability and fragility was found to be high or very high in the 30% of the cases. As for the protection priority, all the studied sites obtained a medium-high result. Finally, the study based on the SWOT-TOWS revealed the possibility of applying action strategies in order to facilitate the compatibility of geotourism with the current productive activities, despite the difficult situation in the study area created by mining activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geotourism)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Geoheritage, Geotourism and the Cultural Landscape: Enhancing the Visitor Experience and Promoting Geoconservation
Geosciences 2018, 8(4), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8040136
Received: 5 March 2018 / Revised: 27 March 2018 / Accepted: 3 April 2018 / Published: 16 April 2018
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Abstract
Geotourism spans a range of visitor interests, from the specialist geotourist to the more general visitor. As well as supporting geoconservation outcomes, it provides economic, cultural, relational and social benefits for both visitors and host communities. The interconnections between geoheritage and the cultural
[...] Read more.
Geotourism spans a range of visitor interests, from the specialist geotourist to the more general visitor. As well as supporting geoconservation outcomes, it provides economic, cultural, relational and social benefits for both visitors and host communities. The interconnections between geoheritage and the cultural components of the landscape have antecedents in concepts of landscape aesthetics in different cultures. These interconnections provide a range of opportunities for enhancing the geotourist experience and promoting geoconservation and geoeducation by means of activities that involve aesthetic and emotional experiences and interpretation through different cultural filters that encourage the rediscovery of a sense of wonder both about the geological stories in the landscape and the human interactions. A cultural ecosystem services framework provides a holistic approach for informing conservation policy, management and planning for geotourism, enabling assessment of multiple benefits and trade-offs for visitors and communities based on the values of the geoheritage assets. Geotourism studies could also benefit from integration of existing theory, conceptual analysis and practice from broader heritage and nature-based tourism and closer collaboration with relevant social sciences. Adhering to sound geoethical practice is an essential part of geotourism, which can also play a role in the promotion of geoethics among the public and professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geotourism)
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