Special Issue "Emergency Management, Communications and the Internet"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Erol Gelenbe

Intelligent Systems and Networks, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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Interests: energy optimization; energy packet networks; networked systems; physical and biological networks; probability models; natural computation
Guest Editor
Dr. Avgoustinos Filippopoulitis

Intelligent Systems and Networks Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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Guest Editor
Dr. Gokce Gorbil

Intelligent Systems and Networks Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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Guest Editor
Dr. Fang-Jing Wu

Intelligent Systems Centre, Nanyang Technological University Singapore, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore, 637553, Singapore
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue is focused on topics encompassing the new research area on Emergency Management and Communications.

It addresses the complex networked and distributed systems that are designed to provide an optimum response and outcome in the presence of potentially dangerous emergencies, such as natural disasters, industrial or environmental catastrophic events, or terrorist attacks. In such contexts a combination of sensing, communication and distributed decision making are needed to be able to guide evacuees, allocate emergency resources and services, direct first responders, preserve life, improve health and limit damage to the physical and natural infrastructure.

Erol Gelenbe, Avgoustinos Filippopoulitis, Gokce Gorbil and Fang-Jing Wu
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • Sensors for Emergency Management and their Evaluation
  • Network Architectures for Emergency Management
  • Definition and Evaluation of Network QoS in Emergency Management
  • Evaluating Sensor Performance in and for Emergencies
  • The Effect of Interconnected Infrastructures in Emergencies
  • Complex System Modeling and Networks of Networks for Emergency Analysis and Optimisation
  • The use of Self-Organisation in Emergency Management System Design
  • System Architectures for Emergency Management
  • Integrated Performance Modeling and Evaluation of Emergency Management Systems
  • Distributed Decision Algorithms for Emergencies, and their Performance
  • The Internet of Things for Emergency Management
  • Emergency Management Simulators for Planning and Training
  • System Test-Beds and Demonstrators
  • Emerging Standards

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Concept for Support of Firefighter Frontline Communication
Future Internet 2013, 5(2), 113-127; doi:10.3390/fi5020113
Received: 24 December 2012 / Revised: 15 March 2013 / Accepted: 8 April 2013 / Published: 16 April 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6573 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In an indoor firefighter mission, coordination and communication support are of the utmost importance. We present our experience from over five years of research with current firefighter support technology. In contrast to some large scale emergency response research, our work is focused on
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In an indoor firefighter mission, coordination and communication support are of the utmost importance. We present our experience from over five years of research with current firefighter support technology. In contrast to some large scale emergency response research, our work is focused on the frontline interaction between teams of firefighters and the incident commander on a single site. In this paper we investigate the flaws in firefighter communication systems. Frequent technical failures and the high cognitive costs incurred by communicating impede coordination. We then extract a list of requirements for an assistant emergency management technology from expert interviews. Thirdly, we provide a system concept and explore challenges for building a novel firefighter support system based on our previous work. The system has three key features: robust ad-hoc network, telemetry and text messaging, as well as implicit interaction. The result would provide a complementary mode of communication in addition to the current trunked radio. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emergency Management, Communications and the Internet)
Open AccessArticle Graph and Analytical Models for Emergency Evacuation
Future Internet 2013, 5(1), 46-55; doi:10.3390/fi5010046
Received: 31 December 2012 / Revised: 31 January 2013 / Accepted: 7 February 2013 / Published: 21 February 2013
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (292 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cyber-Physical-Human Systems (CPHS) combine sensing, communication and control to obtain desirable outcomes in physical environments for human beings, such as buildings or vehicles. A particularly important application area is emergency management. While recent work on the design and optimisation of emergency management schemes
[...] Read more.
Cyber-Physical-Human Systems (CPHS) combine sensing, communication and control to obtain desirable outcomes in physical environments for human beings, such as buildings or vehicles. A particularly important application area is emergency management. While recent work on the design and optimisation of emergency management schemes has relied essentially on discrete event simulation, which is challenged by the substantial amount of programming or reprogramming of the simulation tools and by the scalability and the computing time needed to obtain useful performance estimates, this paper proposes an approach that offers fast estimates based on graph models and probability models. We show that graph models can offer insight into the critical areas in an emergency evacuation and that they can suggest locations where sensor systems are particularly important and may require hardening. On the other hand, we also show that analytical models based on queueing theory can provide useful estimates of evacuation times and for routing optimisation. The results are illustrated with regard to the evacuation of a real-life building. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emergency Management, Communications and the Internet)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Future Research on Cyber-Physical Emergency Management Systems
Future Internet 2013, 5(3), 336-354; doi:10.3390/fi5030336
Received: 15 April 2013 / Accepted: 17 June 2013 / Published: 27 June 2013
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (183 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cyber-physical systems that include human beings and vehicles in a built environment, such as a building or a city, together with sensor networks and decision support systems have attracted much attention. In emergencies, which also include mobile searchers and rescuers, the interactions among
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Cyber-physical systems that include human beings and vehicles in a built environment, such as a building or a city, together with sensor networks and decision support systems have attracted much attention. In emergencies, which also include mobile searchers and rescuers, the interactions among civilians and the environment become much more diverse, and the complexity of the emergency response also becomes much greater. This paper surveys current research on sensor-assisted evacuation and rescue systems and discusses the related research issues concerning communication protocols for sensor networks, as well as several other important issues, such as the integrated asynchronous control of large-scale emergency response systems, knowledge discovery for rescue and prototyping platforms. Then, we suggest directions for further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emergency Management, Communications and the Internet)
Open AccessReview A Review of Cyber Threats and Defence Approaches in Emergency Management
Future Internet 2013, 5(2), 205-236; doi:10.3390/fi5020205
Received: 17 February 2013 / Revised: 19 March 2013 / Accepted: 10 April 2013 / Published: 7 May 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (382 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Emergency planners, first responders and relief workers increasingly rely on computational and communication systems that support all aspects of emergency management, from mitigation and preparedness to response and recovery. Failure of these systems, whether accidental or because of malicious action, can have severe
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Emergency planners, first responders and relief workers increasingly rely on computational and communication systems that support all aspects of emergency management, from mitigation and preparedness to response and recovery. Failure of these systems, whether accidental or because of malicious action, can have severe implications for emergency management. Accidental failures have been extensively documented in the past and significant effort has been put into the development and introduction of more resilient technologies. At the same time researchers have been raising concerns about the potential of cyber attacks to cause physical disasters or to maximise the impact of one by intentionally impeding the work of the emergency services. Here, we provide a review of current research on the cyber threats to communication, sensing, information management and vehicular technologies used in emergency management. We emphasise on open issues for research, which are the cyber threats that have the potential to affect emergency management severely and for which solutions have not yet been proposed in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emergency Management, Communications and the Internet)

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