Special Issue "Food Reformulation and Innovation for Human Health"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Function and Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Emilie Combet

Department of Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: farm-to-fork; nutrition and the lifecycle; nutrition and stress
Guest Editor
Dr. Antonis Vlassopoulos

Nutrient Profiling, Public Health Nutrition, Nestlé Research Center, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, Switzerland
E-Mail
Interests: improving food supply for health; nutrient profiling; nutrition and ageing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The food supply is changing in order to respond to public health and sustainability challenges. Sustainability, farm-to-fork, and increased nutritional value have become part of the manufacturing strategy to address current and future health and societal issues. Traditionally, food reformulation has focused on removing salt, saturated fats, and sugar, with further emphasis on increasing other components, such as fibre, calcium, and iron. Emerging novel foods go beyond this traditional approach and introduce new functionality, properties, or traits, by using novel ingredients or processing methods.

In this Special Issue, we invite papers on all aspects relevant to food reformulation and innovation in the context of (public) health. In particular, submissions using epidemiological approaches, modelling approaches, or submissions that address technological or ethical challenges and constraints associated with food reformulation and innovation are encouraged.

Dr. Emilie Combet
Dr. Antonis Vlassopoulos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food reformulation
  • food innovation
  • novel foods
  • nutrient profiling
  • predictive modelling
  • food supply
  • public health
  • sustainable nutrition

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Reformulation as an Integrated Approach of Four Disciplines: A Qualitative Study with Food Companies
Received: 22 February 2018 / Revised: 26 March 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 20 April 2018
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Abstract
In 2014, the Dutch government agreed with the food sector to lower salt, sugar, saturated fat and energy in foods. To reformulate, an integrated approach of four disciplines (Nutrition & Health, Food Technology, Legislation, and Consumer Perspectives) is important for food companies (Framework
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In 2014, the Dutch government agreed with the food sector to lower salt, sugar, saturated fat and energy in foods. To reformulate, an integrated approach of four disciplines (Nutrition & Health, Food Technology, Legislation, and Consumer Perspectives) is important for food companies (Framework for Reformulation). The objective of this study was to determine whether this framework accurately reflects reformulation processes in food companies. Seventeen Dutch food companies in the bakery, meat and convenience sector were interviewed with a semi-structured topic list. Interviews were transcribed, coded and analysed. Interviews illustrated that there were opportunities to lower salt, sugar and saturated fat (Nutrition & Health). However, there were barriers to replacing the functionality of these ingredients (Food Technology). Most companies would like the government to push reformulation more (Legislation). Traditional meat products and luxury sweet bakery products were considered less suitable for reformulation (Consumer Perspectives). In addition, the reduction of E-numbers was considered important. The important role of the retailer is stressed by the respondents. In conclusion, all four disciplines are important in the reformulation processes in food companies. Reformulation does not only mean the reduction of salt, saturated fat and sugar for companies, but also the reduction of E-numbers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Reformulation and Innovation for Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle Adoptable Interventions, Human Health, and Food Safety Considerations for Reducing Sodium Content of Processed Food Products
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 23 January 2018 / Accepted: 26 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018
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Abstract
Although vital for maintaining health when consumed in moderation, various epidemiological studies in recent years have shown a strong association between excess dietary sodium with an array of health complications. These associations are robust and clinically significant for development of hypertension and prehypertension,
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Although vital for maintaining health when consumed in moderation, various epidemiological studies in recent years have shown a strong association between excess dietary sodium with an array of health complications. These associations are robust and clinically significant for development of hypertension and prehypertension, two of the leading causes of preventable mortality worldwide, in adults with a high-sodium diet. Data from developed nations and transition economies show worldwide sodium intake of higher than recommended amounts in various nations. While natural foods typically contain a moderate amount of sodium, manufactured food products are the main contributor to dietary sodium intake, up to 75% of sodium in diet of American adults, as an example. Lower cost in formulation, positive effects on organoleptic properties of food products, effects on food quality during shelf-life, and microbiological food safety, make sodium chloride a notable candidate and an indispensable part of formulation of various products. Although low-sodium formulation of each product possesses a unique set of challenges, review of literature shows an abundance of successful experiences for products of many categories. The current study discusses adoptable interventions for product development and reformulation of products to achieve a modest amount of final sodium content while maintaining taste, quality, shelf-stability, and microbiological food safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Reformulation and Innovation for Human Health)
Open AccessArticle Development and Physico-Chemical Characterization of a Shea Butter-Containing Lipid Nutrition Supplement for Sub-Saharan Africa
Received: 30 September 2017 / Revised: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 8 November 2017
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Abstract
Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) are used to prevent and treat moderate and severe acute malnutrition, a leading cause of mortality in children-under-five. The physical and chemical changes of two new LNS products were evaluated before and after accelerated shelf life testing (ASLT) according
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Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) are used to prevent and treat moderate and severe acute malnutrition, a leading cause of mortality in children-under-five. The physical and chemical changes of two new LNS products were evaluated before and after accelerated shelf life testing (ASLT) according to protocols suggested by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and Doctors without Borders and compared against USAID’s A-20 paste as a control. LNS formulas containing Shea butter from the Shea nut tree (Vitellaria paradoxa), a common fat source in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, with and without flax-seed oil, as a source of omega-3 fatty acids, were developed. LNS formulas were batched (0.8 kg) in a wet grinder, sealed under nitrogen in three-layer mini-pouches (20 g), and underwent ASLT at 40 ± 2 °C for six months with sampling every eight weeks. At each time point, water activity, moisture, peroxide value, oil separation, vitamin C content, and hardness were evaluated. Results showed comparable stability among all formulas with an increase in Aw (p < 0.05) but no change in vitamin C, oil separation, or peroxide value. Addition of Shea butter improved the LNS’s hardness, which remained stable over time. Modifying fat profile in LNS can improve its texture and essential fatty acid content without affecting its storage stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Reformulation and Innovation for Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle Examining the Relationship between Free Sugars and Calorie Contents in Canadian Prepacked Foods and Beverages
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 18 August 2017 / Accepted: 24 August 2017 / Published: 5 September 2017
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Abstract
To align with broader public health initiatives, reformulation of products to be lower in sugars requires interventions that also aim to reduce calorie contents. Currently available foods and beverages with a range of nutrient levels can be used to project successful reformulation opportunities.
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To align with broader public health initiatives, reformulation of products to be lower in sugars requires interventions that also aim to reduce calorie contents. Currently available foods and beverages with a range of nutrient levels can be used to project successful reformulation opportunities. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between free sugars and calorie levels in Canadian prepackaged foods and beverages. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of the University of Toronto’s 2013 Food Label Database, limited to major sources of total sugar intake in Canada (n = 6755). Penalized B-spline regression modelling was used to examine the relationship between free sugar levels (g/100 g or 100 mL) and caloric density (kcal/100 g or 10mL), by subcategory. Significant relationships were observed for only 3 of 5 beverage subcategories and for 14 of 32 food subcategories. Most subcategories demonstrated a positive trend with varying magnitude, however, results were not consistent across related subcategories (e.g., dairy-based products). Findings highlight potential areas of concern for reformulation, and the need for innovative solutions to ensure free sugars are reduced in products within the context of improving overall nutritional quality of the diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Reformulation and Innovation for Human Health)
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Other

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Open AccessDiscussion Food Composition Databases: Considerations about Complex Food Matrices
Received: 27 October 2017 / Revised: 24 November 2017 / Accepted: 13 December 2017 / Published: 1 January 2018
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Abstract
Nowadays, many countries have their own national Food Composition Databases, whose continuous updating allows the inclusion of a large number of foods, reflecting the food habits of the population and the growing number of foods on the market in the best way possible.
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Nowadays, many countries have their own national Food Composition Databases, whose continuous updating allows the inclusion of a large number of foods, reflecting the food habits of the population and the growing number of foods on the market in the best way possible. Therefore, particular attention should be directed to the study not only of individual foods or food components but also of the nutritional characteristics of dishes, meals and diets, as they are really consumed. Recently, a reviewed sensitivity in Europe towards the implementation of standardized procedures for generating reliable composition data for composite dishes has been carried out. Although direct chemical analysis is the most accurate method to determine food composition, the nutrient content of complex matrices and composite dishes is often calculated from the nutrient contents of the individual ingredients, considering the different thermal treatments and using some preparation factors. In this context, this paper aims to give an updated picture on Food Composition Databases; in particular, their application regarding complex matrices is examined together with the need to optimize their calculated nutritional values. Results obtained by this calculation should almost always be observed as approximations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Reformulation and Innovation for Human Health)
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