Special Issue "Fiber Forming Polymers"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Richard Kotek

College of Textiles, Department of Textile Engineering Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Melt, gel, wet and dry spinning; Novel spinning of high performance synthetic fibers; Nylon 6 extrusion and spinning; Preparation of new cellulose blend fibers and membranes; Ring opening polymerizations of polyesters; Cyclodepolymerization of polyesters; Depolymerization of Nylon 6

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fiber forming polymers are linear macromolecules that are usually suitable for making man-made fibers. However, non-flammable Basofil fiber is an exception because it is cross-linked. Depending on the molecular polymer structure and production method, these fibers can be soft, highly elastic or super strong. A review of this technology should be interesting.

The objective of this Special Issue is to focus on M5, PTT, and other newer polymers, as well as on new processes, such the hIB process, centrifugal spinning or melt electrospinning for fiber forming polymers. We shall also accept papers on fiber-based blends of cellulose and proteins. Original research and review papers are invited for this Special Issue.

Dr. Richard Kotek
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fiber
  • forming
  • polymers
  • spinning
  • M5
  • PTT
  • hIB process
  • centrifugal spinning
  • Basofil

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effect of Polymer Concentration, Rotational Speed, and Solvent Mixture on Fiber Formation Using Forcespinning®
Fibers 2016, 4(2), 20; doi:10.3390/fib4020020
Received: 3 December 2015 / Accepted: 21 May 2016 / Published: 7 June 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4516 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Polycaprolactone (PCL) fibers were produced using Forcespinning® (FS). The effects of PCL concentration, solvent mixture, and the spinneret rotational speed on fiber formation were evaluated. The concentration of the polymer in the solvents was a critical determinant of the solution viscosity. Lower
[...] Read more.
Polycaprolactone (PCL) fibers were produced using Forcespinning® (FS). The effects of PCL concentration, solvent mixture, and the spinneret rotational speed on fiber formation were evaluated. The concentration of the polymer in the solvents was a critical determinant of the solution viscosity. Lower PCL concentrations resulted in low solution viscosities with a correspondingly low fiber production rate with many beads. Bead-free fibers with high production rate and uniform fiber diameter distribution were obtained from the optimum PCL concentration (i.e., 12.5 wt%) with tetrahydrofuran (THF) as the solvent. The addition of N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF) to the THF solvent promoted the gradual formation of beads, split fibers, and generally affected the distribution of fiber diameters. The crystallinity of PCL fibers was also affected by the processing conditions, spinning speed, and solvent mixture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Forming Polymers)
Open AccessArticle Eco-Friendly Disperse Dyeing and Functional Finishing of Nylon 6 Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide
Fibers 2015, 3(3), 309-322; doi:10.3390/fib3030309
Received: 13 June 2015 / Accepted: 22 July 2015 / Published: 4 August 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (698 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, a supercritical carbon dioxide assembly was successfully constructed for dyeing Nylon6 fabric. Primary experiments were carried out to confirm the possibility of bringing the dyeing up to factory scale. A series of disperse azo dyes with potential antibacterial activity were
[...] Read more.
In this work, a supercritical carbon dioxide assembly was successfully constructed for dyeing Nylon6 fabric. Primary experiments were carried out to confirm the possibility of bringing the dyeing up to factory scale. A series of disperse azo dyes with potential antibacterial activity were applied to dye the fabric under our study in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The factors affecting the dyeing conditions (i.e., dye concentration, time, temperature and pressure) and functional properties were discussed and compared with those in aqueous dyeing. The comparison revealed that elimination of auxiliary chemicals such as salt, carrier or dispersing agent has no diverse effect on dyeing. The color strength of the dyed fabric evaluated by using K/S measurements increased by increasing dye concentration from 2% to 6% owf. (on weight of fabric). The nylon6 fabrics dyed in supercritical carbon dioxide have good fastness properties, and especially light fastness compared with conventional exhaustion dyeing. Antibacterial activity of the dyed samples under supercritical conditions was evaluated and the results showed excellent antibacterial efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Forming Polymers)
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