Special Issue "Biopolymer Nanofiber"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Suman Sinha Ray

Corporate Innovation Center, United States Gypsum 700 N US-45, Libertyville 60048, IL, USA
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) 842 West Taylor Street, M/C 251, Room 2039ERF Chicago 60607-7022, IL, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 312-996-3439
Fax: +1 312-413-0447
Interests: advanced manufacturing; experimental and theoretical thermal-fluid sciences at the micro/nanoscale; polymer and oxide materials; nano-structured materials; drug delivery; alternative energy; experimental and theoretical study of production methods of nonwovens (electrospinning, solution blowing and melt blowing)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modern technology is experiencing a significant shift towards biobased polymers, caused by their biodegradablity, renewable sources, or due to their “green” agricultural biomolecular origin. The shift is driven by a necessity to reduce dependence on synthetic materials, namely on petroleum-derived polymers. In fact, according to some estimates, almost 40% of global production of petroleum is used to produce petroleum-based polymers. The recent push towards a sustainable future (e.g., the Paris Climate Accord, etc.) is also pushing industry to minimize their dependence on petroleum. As a result, significant efforts are directed toward production of biopolymers. Biopolymer-based nanofibers are going to play a significant part in this effort owing to sustainability with added functionality from biopolymers.

In this Special Issue, biopolymer-based nanofibers original research papers, as well as reviews, are welcome. The goal is to gather contributions on various aspects related to biopolymer based nanofibers, namely, manufacturing methods, functional applications (e.g., drug delivery, power storage device, filtration, etc.), molecular characterizations, numerical modeling, etc.

I hope that this Special Issue will provide the scientific community a thorough overview of the current research on “Biopolymer Nanofibers”.

Dr. Suman Sinha Ray
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biopolymer based nanofiber
  • Manufacturing en masse
  • Functional Applications
  • Molecular Charachterization
  • Novel production method
  • Numerical modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Production of Nanocellulose from Pineapple Leaf Fibers via High-Shear Homogenization and Ultrasonication
Fibers 2018, 6(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6020028
Received: 9 April 2018 / Revised: 26 April 2018 / Accepted: 1 May 2018 / Published: 3 May 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3178 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the isolation and characterization of nanocellulose from pineapple leaf fibers (PLF) were carried out. Chemical pretreatment included pulping, bleaching, and acid hydrolysis to remove lignin, hemicellulose, and extractive substances were conducted. This was followed by high-shear homogenization and ultrasonication to
[...] Read more.
In this study, the isolation and characterization of nanocellulose from pineapple leaf fibers (PLF) were carried out. Chemical pretreatment included pulping, bleaching, and acid hydrolysis to remove lignin, hemicellulose, and extractive substances were conducted. This was followed by high-shear homogenization and ultrasonication to produce nanocellulose. Morphological changes to the PLF due to treatment were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This showed that the PLF had a diameter of 1–10 µm after high-shear homogenizing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the nanofibers after ultrasonication for 60 min showed 40–70 nm diameters. Particle size analysis (PSA) indicates that the fibers had an average diameter of 68 nm. Crystallinity index was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and had the highest value after acid hydrolysis at 83% but after 60 min ultrasonication, this decreased to 62%. Meanwhile, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed there was no chemical structure change after acid hydrolysis. The most significant finding from thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) is that the higher degradation temperature of nanofibers indicates superior thermal stability over untreated fiber. These results indicate that PLF waste could become a viable source of commercially valuable nanocellulose. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biopolymer Nanofiber)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview A Review on Biopolymer-Based Fibers via Electrospinning and Solution Blowing and Their Applications
Fibers 2018, 6(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6030045
Received: 18 April 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 June 2018 / Published: 2 July 2018
PDF Full-text (11327 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Electrospinning, for the last few decades, has been extensively acknowledged for its ability to manufacture a macro/nanofibrous architecture from biopolymers, which is otherwise difficult to obtain, in a cost effective and user-friendly technique. Such biopolymer nanofibers can be tailored to meet applications such
[...] Read more.
Electrospinning, for the last few decades, has been extensively acknowledged for its ability to manufacture a macro/nanofibrous architecture from biopolymers, which is otherwise difficult to obtain, in a cost effective and user-friendly technique. Such biopolymer nanofibers can be tailored to meet applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, filtration, fuel cell, and food packaging etc. Due to their structural uniqueness, chemical and mechanical stability, functionality, super-high surface area-to-volume ratio, and one-dimensional orientation, electrospun biopolymer nanofibers have been proven to be extremely beneficial. A parallel method in nonwoven methodologies called “Solution Blowing” has also become a potential candidate to fabricate a similar type of architecture from biopolymer fibers, and is gaining popularity among researchers, despite its recent advent in early 2000’s. This review chiefly focuses on the fabrication of biopolymer macro/nanofibers via electrospinning and solution blowing, and several applications of such fiber architectures. Biopolymers include plant- and animal-derived biopolymers, such as cellulose, lignin, chitin, and chitosan, as well as proteins and their derivatives. The fabrication of biopolymer fibers from these biopolymers alone or as blends, predominantly with biodegradable polymers like Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), Polyethylene Oxide (PEO), Polyethylene glycol (PEG), poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) etc., or non-biodegradable polymers like polyamide, Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) etc., will be discussed in detail, along with the applications of several composites of such sort. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biopolymer Nanofiber)
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