Special Issue "Environmentally-sustainable Flame Retardant and Heat Resistant Fibres and Textiles"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. A. Richard Horrocks

Institute for Materials Research and Innovation, University of Bolton, Bolton, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Flame retardant, additive, surface treatments, inherent flame retardancy, copolymers, heat resistance, thermal degradation, extrusion, processing, tensile properties, natural fibres, chemical fibres

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fire safety is an increasingly important factor in any society, and both national and international fire regulations in the private, contract, public, and transport sectors often require heat and/or flame retardant (or resistant) fibres present within structures and products comprising fibrous components. These may include fibres for use in textiles, fibre-reinforced composites and nanofibrous arrays. However, there are increasing concerns about associated ecotoxicological and environmentally-sustainable issues regarding the chemical and physical processes involved in their manufacture, application, and end-of-life disposal.

This Special Issue invites papers that focus on environmental sustainability as it relates to heat and/or flame resistant fibre production and processing, and the influence these have on the final structures or products that comprise them. Specific areas include:

  • Development of heat and/or flame resistant, fibre-forming biopolymers;
  • Synthesis and application of biodegradable fibre-forming polymers with heat and/or flame resistance;
  • Environmentally sustainable flame retardant additives and treatments –synthesis, processing and application;
  • Development of high performance, heat and flame resistant fibres based on environmentally-sustainable precursors and processes (including ceramic-based and other inorganic fibres)

I hope that this Special Issue will provide both a snapshot of the state of knowledge within this area and a basis for future research.

Prof. Dr. A. Richard Horrocks
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental sustainablitiy
  • flame retardant
  • additive,
  • surface treatments,
  • inherent flame retardancy,
  • biopolymers,
  • copolymers,
  • heat resistance,
  • thermal degradation,
  • extrusion,
  • processing,
  • tensile properties,
  • natural fibres,
  • chemical fibres

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Flame Retardant Multilayered Coatings on Acrylic Fabrics Prepared by One-Step Deposition of Chitosan/Montmorillonite Complexes
Fibers 2018, 6(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6020036
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 4 June 2018
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Abstract
Multilayered coatings deposited using the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique have attracted great interest in recent years as a sustainable and efficient solution for conferring flame retardant properties to fabrics. The unique structure and interaction established upon the coating assembly are the key factors
[...] Read more.
Multilayered coatings deposited using the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique have attracted great interest in recent years as a sustainable and efficient solution for conferring flame retardant properties to fabrics. The unique structure and interaction established upon the coating assembly are the key factors for successful flame retardant properties. In this study we aimed at the deposition of multilayered coatings comprising chitosan and montmorillonite with a LbL-like structure and interactions by the simple processing of compacted chitosan/montmorillonite complexes obtained by the direct mixing of an oppositely charged solution/suspension. Upon drying, the prepared complex yielded a continuous coating characterized by a brick-and-mortar multi-layered structure, in which oriented clay nanoplatelets were held together by a continuous chitosan matrix. When deposited on acrylic fabrics these coatings were able to suppress the melt-dripping phenomenon, and at 10 and 20% add-ons achieved self-extinguishing behavior within a few seconds after ignition. Cone calorimetry testing revealed an increase in time to ignition (up to +46%) and considerable reductions of the rates at which heat is released (up to −62 and −49% for peak of heat release rate and total heat release, respectively). A reduction in the total smoke release (up to −49%) was also observed. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Environmentally Sustainable Flame Retardant Surface Treatments for Textiles: The Potential of a Novel Atmospheric Plasma/UV Laser Technology
Fibers 2018, 6(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6020031
Received: 7 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 14 May 2018
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Abstract
Conventional flame retardant (FR) application processes for textiles involve aqueous processing which is resource-intensive in terms of energy and water usage. Recent research using sol-gel and layer-by-layer chemistries, while claimed to be based on more environmentally sustainable chemistry, still require aqueous media with
[...] Read more.
Conventional flame retardant (FR) application processes for textiles involve aqueous processing which is resource-intensive in terms of energy and water usage. Recent research using sol-gel and layer-by-layer chemistries, while claimed to be based on more environmentally sustainable chemistry, still require aqueous media with the continuing problem of water management and drying processes being required. This paper outlines the initial forensic work to characterise commercially produced viscose/flax, cellulosic furnishing fabrics which have had conferred upon them durable flame retardant (FR) treatments using a novel, patented atmospheric plasma/Ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser facility for processing textiles with the formal name Multiplexed Laser Surface Enhancement (MLSE) system. This system (MTIX Ltd., Huddersfield, UK) is claimed to offer the means of directly bonding of flame retardant precursor species to the component fibres introduced either before plasma/UV exposure or into the plasma/UV reaction zone itself; thereby eliminating a number of wet processing cycles. Nine commercial fabrics, pre-impregnated with a semi-durable, proprietary FR finish and subjected to the MLSE process have been analysed for their flame retardant properties before and after a 40 °C 30 min water soak. For one fabric, the pre-impregnated fabric was subjected to a normal heat cure treatment which conferred the same level of durability as the plasma/UV-treated analogue. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and limiting oxygen index (LOI) were used to further characterise their burning behaviour and the effect of the treatment on surface fibre morphologies were assessed. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that negligible changes had occurred to surface topography of the viscose fibres occurred during plasma/UV excimer processing. Full article
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Figure 1

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