E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advances in Applied Thermodynamics"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300). This special issue belongs to the section "Thermodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Brian Agnew (Website)

Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK
Phone: +44 191 227 3779
Fax: +44 191 227 3066
Interests: turbomachinery; thermal systems; CHP; finite time thermodynamics; entropy generation; exergy analysis of complex systems; combined cycles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of entropy originated in the period when thermodynamics was concerned with the conditions under which heat can be converted to work. It was formalized and named (from the Greek εντροπία, transformation) by Rudolf Clausius from considerations of reversible processes. Usually today an irreversible transformation is identified by the Clausius Inequality. In his later work Clausius included irreversible process to derive the Second Law of Thermodynamics as an equality and included a term to account for entropy generation by dissipative processes. A more generalized formulation of the entropy concept, developed by Boltzmann, is associated with disorder or the destruction of the coherence of an initial state. This has been widely adopted in many diverse fields of study including chemistry, biology, cosmology and information science. An indication of the importance of the Second Law of Thermodynamics can be gauged by the following statement made by Sir Arthur Eddington "If someone points out to you that your pet theory of the universe is in disagreement with Maxwell's equations- then so much the worse for Maxwell's equations. If it is found to be contradicted by observation-well, these experimentalists do bungle things sometimes. But if your theory is found to be against the Second Law of Thermodynamics I can offer you no hope". The Second Law played a key role in the development of Classical Thermodynamics in the 20th century with entropy revealing some essential characteristics of the behavior of matter and energy. In moving away from equilibrium states and adopting mathematical techniques from other branches of science the analysis of Carnot has been extended to include thermodynamic systems with fixed rates or durations and constraints on heat or mass transfer surfaces. This exciting development has established the conditions appropriate to time or rate constrained processes and the conditions for optimal configurations of heat and mass exchange processes. It is clear that such techniques will play an important part in energy saving technologies that are so important today.

Prof. Dr. Brian Agnew
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • finite time thermodynamics
  • entropy generation minimization
  • optimization
  • thermodynamic systems

Published Papers (15 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-15
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle The Q-Exponential Decay of Subjective Probability for Future Reward: A Psychophysical Time Approach
Entropy 2014, 16(10), 5537-5545; doi:10.3390/e16105537
Received: 29 January 2014 / Revised: 12 March 2014 / Accepted: 17 October 2014 / Published: 21 October 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (721 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study experimentally examined why subjective probability for delayed reward decays non-exponentially (“hyperbolically”, i.e., q ˂ 1 in the q-exponential discount function) in humans. Our results indicate that nonlinear psychophysical time causes hyperbolic time-decay of subjective probability for delayed reward. Implications [...] Read more.
This study experimentally examined why subjective probability for delayed reward decays non-exponentially (“hyperbolically”, i.e., q ˂ 1 in the q-exponential discount function) in humans. Our results indicate that nonlinear psychophysical time causes hyperbolic time-decay of subjective probability for delayed reward. Implications for econophysics and neuroeconomics are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle An Energetic Analysis of the Phase Separation in Non-Ionic Surfactant Mixtures: The Role of the Headgroup Structure
Entropy 2014, 16(8), 4375-4391; doi:10.3390/e16084375
Received: 31 March 2014 / Revised: 24 June 2014 / Accepted: 30 July 2014 / Published: 4 August 2014
PDF Full-text (1199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The main goal of this paper was to examine the effect of the hydrophilic surfactant headgroup on the phase behavior of non-ionic surfactant mixtures. Four mixed systems composed of an ethoxylated plus sugar-based surfactants, each having the same hydrophobic tail, were investigated. [...] Read more.
The main goal of this paper was to examine the effect of the hydrophilic surfactant headgroup on the phase behavior of non-ionic surfactant mixtures. Four mixed systems composed of an ethoxylated plus sugar-based surfactants, each having the same hydrophobic tail, were investigated. We found that the hydrophilicity of the surfactant inhibits the tendency of the system to phase separate, which is sensitive to the presence of NaCl. Applying a classical phase separation thermodynamic model, the corresponding energy parameters were evaluated. In all cases, the parameters were found to depend on the type of nonionic surfactant, its concentration in the micellar solution and the presence of NaCl in the medium. The experimental results can be explained by assuming the phase separation process takes place as a result of reduced hydration of the surfactant headgroup caused by a temperature increase. The enthalpy-entropy compensation plot exhibits excellent linearity. We found that all the mixed surfactant systems coincided on the same straight line, the compensation temperature being lower in the presence of NaCl. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle How to Determine Losses in a Flow Field: A Paradigm Shift towards the Second Law Analysis
Entropy 2014, 16(6), 2959-2989; doi:10.3390/e16062959
Received: 26 February 2014 / Revised: 2 April 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 26 May 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2515 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Assuming that CFD solutions will be more and more used to characterize losses in terms of drag for external flows and head loss for internal flows, we suggest to replace single-valued data, like the drag force or a pressure drop, by field [...] Read more.
Assuming that CFD solutions will be more and more used to characterize losses in terms of drag for external flows and head loss for internal flows, we suggest to replace single-valued data, like the drag force or a pressure drop, by field information about the losses. These information are gained when the entropy generation in the flow field is analyzed, an approach that often is called second law analysis (SLA), referring to the second law of thermodynamics. We show that this SLA approach is straight-forward, systematic and helpful when it comes to the physical interpretation of the losses in a flow field. Various examples are given, including external and internal flows, two phase flow, compressible flow and unsteady flow. Finally, we show that an energy transfer within a certain process can be put into a broader perspective by introducing the entropic potential of an energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle A Probabilistic Description of the Configurational Entropy of Mixing
Entropy 2014, 16(5), 2850-2868; doi:10.3390/e16052850
Received: 27 February 2014 / Revised: 16 May 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 23 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (346 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work presents a formalism to calculate the configurational entropy of mixing based on the identification of non-interacting atomic complexes in the mixture and the calculation of their respective probabilities, instead of computing the number of atomic configurations in a lattice. The [...] Read more.
This work presents a formalism to calculate the configurational entropy of mixing based on the identification of non-interacting atomic complexes in the mixture and the calculation of their respective probabilities, instead of computing the number of atomic configurations in a lattice. The methodology is applied in order to develop a general analytical expression for the configurational entropy of mixing of interstitial solutions. The expression is valid for any interstitial concentration, is suitable for the treatment of interstitial short-range order (SRO) and can be applied to tetrahedral or octahedral interstitial solutions in any crystal lattice. The effect of the SRO of H on the structural properties of the Nb-H and bcc Zr-H solid solutions is studied using an accurate description of the configurational entropy. The methodology can also be applied to systems with no translational symmetry, such as liquids and amorphous materials. An expression for the configurational entropy of a granular system composed by equal sized hard spheres is deduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle Maximum Power of Thermally and Electrically Coupled Thermoelectric Generators
Entropy 2014, 16(5), 2890-2903; doi:10.3390/e16052890
Received: 26 February 2014 / Revised: 2 April 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 23 May 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (549 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In a recent work, we have reported a study on the figure of merit of a thermoelectric system composed by thermoelectric generators connected electrically and thermally in different configurations. In this work, we are interested in analyzing the output power delivered by [...] Read more.
In a recent work, we have reported a study on the figure of merit of a thermoelectric system composed by thermoelectric generators connected electrically and thermally in different configurations. In this work, we are interested in analyzing the output power delivered by a thermoelectric system for different arrays of thermoelectric materials in each configuration. Our study shows the impact of the array of thermoelectric materials in the output power of the composite system. We evaluate numerically the corresponding maximum output power for each configuration and determine the optimum array and configuration for maximum power. We compare our results with other recently reported studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Optimization of Biomass-Fuelled Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) Systems Integrated with Subcritical or Transcritical Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs)
Entropy 2014, 16(5), 2433-2453; doi:10.3390/e16052433
Received: 28 February 2014 / Revised: 14 April 2014 / Accepted: 25 April 2014 / Published: 30 April 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1512 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work is focused on the thermodynamic optimization of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs), coupled with absorption or adsorption cooling units, for combined cooling heating and power (CCHP) generation from biomass combustion. Results were obtained by modelling with the main aim of providing [...] Read more.
This work is focused on the thermodynamic optimization of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs), coupled with absorption or adsorption cooling units, for combined cooling heating and power (CCHP) generation from biomass combustion. Results were obtained by modelling with the main aim of providing optimization guidelines for the operating conditions of these types of systems, specifically the subcritical or transcritical ORC, when integrated in a CCHP system to supply typical heating and cooling demands in the tertiary sector. The thermodynamic approach was complemented, to avoid its possible limitations, by the technological constraints of the expander, the heat exchangers and the pump of the ORC. The working fluids considered are: n-pentane, n-heptane, octamethyltrisiloxane, toluene and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane. In addition, the energy and environmental performance of the different optimal CCHP plants was investigated. The optimal plant from the energy and environmental point of view is the one integrated by a toluene recuperative ORC, although it is limited to a development with a turbine type expander. Also, the trigeneration plant could be developed in an energy and environmental efficient way with an n-pentane recuperative ORC and a volumetric type expander. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle District Heating Mode Analysis Based on an Air-cooled Combined Heat and Power Station
Entropy 2014, 16(4), 1883-1901; doi:10.3390/e16041883
Received: 27 December 2013 / Revised: 25 February 2014 / Accepted: 13 March 2014 / Published: 26 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1195 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As an important research subject, district heating with combined heat and power (CHP) has significant potential for energy conservation. This paper utilised a 200 MW air-cooled unit as an actual case and presented a design scheme and energy consumption analysis of three [...] Read more.
As an important research subject, district heating with combined heat and power (CHP) has significant potential for energy conservation. This paper utilised a 200 MW air-cooled unit as an actual case and presented a design scheme and energy consumption analysis of three typical CHP modes, including the low vacuum mode (LVM), the extraction condensing mode (ECM), and the absorbing heat pump mode (AHPM). The advantages and disadvantages of each mode (including their practical problems) were analysed, and suggestions for the best mode were proposed. The energy consumption of the three heating modes changed with the heating load. When the heating load was increased, the net power of the entire system decreased to different degrees. In this paper, the energy conservation effect of the LVM was the most ideal, followed by the ECM and the AHPM. Besides, the LVM and AHPM were able to supply larger heat loads than the ECM, which was limited by the minimum cooling flow of the low pressure cylinder. Furthermore, in order to get a more general conclusion, a similar case with an air-cooled 300 MW unit is studied, showing that the fuel consumption levels of ECM and AHPM have changed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle Applied Thermodynamics: Grain Boundary Segregation
Entropy 2014, 16(3), 1462-1483; doi:10.3390/e16031462
Received: 5 February 2014 / Revised: 20 February 2014 / Accepted: 28 February 2014 / Published: 12 March 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (704 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chemical composition of interfaces—free surfaces and grain boundaries—is generally described by the Langmuir–McLean segregation isotherm controlled by Gibbs energy of segregation. Various components of the Gibbs energy of segregation, the standard and the excess ones as well as other thermodynamic state functions—enthalpy, [...] Read more.
Chemical composition of interfaces—free surfaces and grain boundaries—is generally described by the Langmuir–McLean segregation isotherm controlled by Gibbs energy of segregation. Various components of the Gibbs energy of segregation, the standard and the excess ones as well as other thermodynamic state functions—enthalpy, entropy and volume—of interfacial segregation are derived and their physical meaning is elucidated. The importance of the thermodynamic state functions of grain boundary segregation, their dependence on volume solid solubility, mutual solute–solute interaction and pressure effect in ferrous alloys is demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle Optimal Thermal Design of a Stacked Mini-Channel Heat Sink Cooled by a Low Flow Rate Coolant
Entropy 2013, 15(11), 4716-4731; doi:10.3390/e15114716
Received: 15 August 2013 / Revised: 15 October 2013 / Accepted: 24 October 2013 / Published: 31 October 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (474 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Application requirements for avionics are often very strict. For example, the heat sinks of avionics need very good temperature uniformity, but the flow rate of coolant is very restricted. In addition, the use of micro-channels is not recommended due to the potential [...] Read more.
Application requirements for avionics are often very strict. For example, the heat sinks of avionics need very good temperature uniformity, but the flow rate of coolant is very restricted. In addition, the use of micro-channels is not recommended due to the potential clogging issue. Considering these design requirements, we will discuss a multiple-objective optimal design method to obtain a good stacked mini-channel structure for avionics applications. In our thermal design, the design variables are the mini-channel geometry parameters. Temperature uniformity, entropy generation, max temperature of heat sink and pump work are chosen as the objective functions. A Multi Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA) and Fluent solver are used together to minimize multiple objective functions subject to constraints, and locate the Pareto front. By analyzing the multiple objective optimal results, we can draw the conclusion that the objective functions of Tmax and sg have same effect on the optimization, and the multiple optimal results are a set and not a single value. If mostly focusing on the temperature uniformity, we can recommend some optimal structures to design a stacked mini-channel heat sink. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle Infrared Cloaking, Stealth, and the Second Law of Thermodynamics
Entropy 2012, 14(10), 1915-1938; doi:10.3390/e14101915
Received: 6 July 2012 / Revised: 8 September 2012 / Accepted: 20 September 2012 / Published: 15 October 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1683 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Infrared signature management (IRSM) has been a primary aeronautical concern for over 50 years. Most strategies and technologies are limited by the second law of thermodynamics. In this article, IRSM is considered in light of theoretical developments over the last 15 years [...] Read more.
Infrared signature management (IRSM) has been a primary aeronautical concern for over 50 years. Most strategies and technologies are limited by the second law of thermodynamics. In this article, IRSM is considered in light of theoretical developments over the last 15 years that have put the absolute status of the second law into doubt and that might open the door to a new class of broadband IR stealth and cloaking techniques. Following a brief overview of IRSM and its current thermodynamic limitations, theoretical and experimental challenges to the second law are reviewed. One proposal is treated in detail: a high power density, solid-state power source to convert thermal energy into electrical or chemical energy. Next, second-law based infrared signature management (SL-IRSM) strategies are considered for two representative military scenarios: an underground installation and a SL-based jet engine. It is found that SL-IRSM could be technologically disruptive across the full spectrum of IRSM modalities, including camouflage, surveillance, night vision, target acquisition, tracking, and homing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle Equivalence of Partition Functions Leads to Classification of Entropies and Means
Entropy 2012, 14(8), 1317-1342; doi:10.3390/e14081317
Received: 24 April 2012 / Revised: 26 June 2012 / Accepted: 9 July 2012 / Published: 27 July 2012
PDF Full-text (385 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We derive a two-parameter family of generalized entropies, Spq, and means mpq. To this end, assume that we want to calculate an entropy and a mean for n non-negative real numbers {x1,,x [...] Read more.
We derive a two-parameter family of generalized entropies, Spq, and means mpq. To this end, assume that we want to calculate an entropy and a mean for n non-negative real numbers {x1,,xn}. For comparison, we consider {m1,,mk} where mi = m for all i = 1,,k and where m and k are chosen such that the lp and lq norms of {x1,,xn} and {m1,,mk} coincide. We formally allow k to be real. Then, we define k, log k, and m to be a generalized cardinality kpq, a generalized entropy Spq, and a generalized mean mpq respectively. We show that this family of entropies includes the Shannon and Rényi entropies and that the family of generalized means includes the power means (such as arithmetic, harmonic, geometric, root-mean-square, maximum, and minimum) as well as novel means of Shannon-like and Rényi-like forms. A thermodynamic interpretation arises from the fact that the lp norm is closely related to the partition function at inverse temperature β = p. Namely, two systems possess the same generalized entropy and generalized mean energy if and only if their partition functions agree at two temperatures, which is also equivalent to the condition that their Helmholtz free energies agree at these two temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle Association of Finite-Dimension Thermodynamics and a Bond-Graph Approach for Modeling an Irreversible Heat Engine
Entropy 2012, 14(7), 1234-1258; doi:10.3390/e14071234
Received: 23 April 2012 / Revised: 22 June 2012 / Accepted: 2 July 2012 / Published: 12 July 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1036 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent decades, the approach known as Finite-Dimension Thermodynamics has provided a fruitful theoretical framework for the optimization of heat engines operating between a heat source (at temperature Ths) and a heat sink (at temperature Tcs). We [...] Read more.
In recent decades, the approach known as Finite-Dimension Thermodynamics has provided a fruitful theoretical framework for the optimization of heat engines operating between a heat source (at temperature Ths) and a heat sink (at temperature Tcs). We will show in this paper that the approach detailed in a previous paper [1] can be used to analytically model irreversible heat engines (with an additional assumption on the linearity of the heat transfer laws). By defining two dimensionless parameters, the intensity of internal dissipation and heat leakage within a heat engine were quantified. We then established the analogy between an endoreversible heat engine and an irreversible heat engine by using the apparent temperatures (TcsTλ,φ cs, ThsTλ,φ hs) and apparent conductances (KhKλ h, KcKλ c). We thus found the analytical expression of the maximum power of an irreversible heat engine. However, these apparent temperatures should not be used to calculate the conversion efficiency at the optimal operating point by analogy with the case of an endoreversible heat engine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle Open Problems on Information and Feedback Controlled Systems
Entropy 2012, 14(4), 834-847; doi:10.3390/e14040834
Received: 16 January 2012 / Revised: 28 March 2012 / Accepted: 12 April 2012 / Published: 19 April 2012
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (119 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Feedback or closed-loop control allows dynamical systems to increase their performance up to a limit imposed by the second law of thermodynamics. It is expected that within this limit, the system performance increases as the controller uses more information about the system. [...] Read more.
Feedback or closed-loop control allows dynamical systems to increase their performance up to a limit imposed by the second law of thermodynamics. It is expected that within this limit, the system performance increases as the controller uses more information about the system. However, despite the relevant progresses made recently, a general and complete formal development to justify this statement using information theory is still lacking. We present here the state-of-the-art and the main open problems that include aspects of the redundancy of correlated operations of feedback control and the continuous operation of feedback control. Complete answers to these questions are required to firmly establish the thermodynamics of feedback controlled systems. Other relevant open questions concern the implications of the theoretical results for the limitations in the performance of feedback controlled flashing ratchets, and for the operation and performance of nanotechnology devices and biological systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle Optimal Design of ORC Systems with a Low-Temperature Heat Source
Entropy 2012, 14(2), 370-389; doi:10.3390/e14020370
Received: 5 December 2011 / Revised: 30 January 2012 / Accepted: 8 February 2012 / Published: 21 February 2012
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (399 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A numerical model of subcritical and trans-critical power cycles using a fixed-flowrate low-temperature heat source has been validated and used to calculate the combinations of the maximum cycle pressure (Pev) and the difference between the source temperature and the maximum [...] Read more.
A numerical model of subcritical and trans-critical power cycles using a fixed-flowrate low-temperature heat source has been validated and used to calculate the combinations of the maximum cycle pressure (Pev) and the difference between the source temperature and the maximum working fluid temperature (DT) which maximize the thermal efficiency (ηth) or minimize the non-dimensional exergy losses (β), the total thermal conductance of the heat exchangers (UAt) and the turbine size (SP). Optimum combinations of Pev and DT were calculated for each one of these four objective functions for two working fluids (R134a, R141b), three source temperatures and three values of the non-dimensional power output. The ratio of UAt over the net power output (which is a first approximation of the initial cost per kW) shows that R141b is the better working fluid for the conditions under study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Open AccessArticle The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Approach to Far-From-Local-Equilibrium Thermodynamics
Entropy 2012, 14(2), 92-130; doi:10.3390/e14020092
Received: 12 October 2011 / Revised: 31 December 2011 / Accepted: 18 January 2012 / Published: 30 January 2012
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (596 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE) method for the description of the time-dependent behavior of dynamical systems in non-equilibrium states is a general, effective, physically based method for model order reduction that was originally developed in the framework of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. A [...] Read more.
The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE) method for the description of the time-dependent behavior of dynamical systems in non-equilibrium states is a general, effective, physically based method for model order reduction that was originally developed in the framework of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. A generalized mathematical formulation is presented here that allows including nonlinear constraints in non-local equilibrium systems characterized by the existence of a non-increasing Lyapunov functional under the system’s internal dynamics. The generalized formulation of RCCE enables to clarify the essentials of the method and the built-in general feature of thermodynamic consistency in the chemical kinetics context. In this paper, we work out the details of the method in a generalized mathematical-physics framework, but for definiteness we detail its well-known implementation in the traditional chemical kinetics framework. We detail proofs and spell out explicit functional dependences so as to bring out and clarify each underlying assumption of the method. In the standard context of chemical kinetics of ideal gas mixtures, we discuss the relations between the validity of the detailed balance condition off-equilibrium and the thermodynamic consistency of the method. We also discuss two examples of RCCE gas-phase combustion calculations to emphasize the constraint-dependent performance of the RCCE method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Applied Thermodynamics)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Entropy Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
entropy@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Entropy
Back to Top