Special Issue "Technology Enhancing the Skills of Students with Disabilities"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Maria Earman Stetter

Director of New Deal Teacher Preparation Programs and Associate Professor of Special Education, College of Education, Roosevelt University, 430 S. Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60605, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: special education; technology and learning disabilities; teaching and learning; inclusive education; interenational learning; online learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increasingly, we are in a digital age where it is important to provide opportunities to serve students with special needs with the most up-to-date technology. We must examine how are we utilizing technology in the classroom with all types of learners but most crucially students with special needs who often benefit from a more hands-on approach that computers can provide? What are teacher best practices for students to learn today in our classrooms that utilize technology? How are we using computers in the classroom with students with exceptionalities such as learning disabilities, emotional disturbance, autism, intellectual disability, and other lower special needs?

In fact, in a field that is currently going through constant changes due to new usages of media, such as apps, programs and even blended learning, it is important to examine best practices in order to serve future students with special needs.

We look forward to receiving your submission of new research pairing technology with this population, or a review of current literature focusing toward directions.

Maria Earman Stetter
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • special education
  • computer learning
  • online/web-based instruction
  • assistive technology
  • apps
  • exceptionality
  • technology integration
  • blended instruction

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Teaching Pre-Service Teachers How to Utilize Web 2.0 Platforms to Support the Educational Needs of Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(2), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8020080
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 26 May 2018 / Accepted: 31 May 2018 / Published: 2 June 2018
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Abstract
It is without question that technology in schools is here to stay. Educators have always been interested in the extent to which technology can be used to transform education and enhance student learning; however, the degree to which it is utilized in teacher
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It is without question that technology in schools is here to stay. Educators have always been interested in the extent to which technology can be used to transform education and enhance student learning; however, the degree to which it is utilized in teacher preparation programs for pre-service teachers in terms of Web 2.0 use with future students is under debate. Web 2.0 use can be a particularly interesting tool for teachers to use in differentiating instructional strategies for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Therefore, it is worthwhile for teacher preparation programs to look at how Web 2.0 platforms can further support students in special education in such settings. The following study delineates data from a study of N = 82 pre-service teachers. Throughout the course of this study, all students were administered a pre- and post-survey that asked questions specific to current knowledge of Web 2.0 and the extent to which they thought it could be used in their future teaching practices. In addition, all students completed an assignment within their respective courses that embedded a specific Web 2.0 component. This assignment required pre-service teacher candidates to utilize the Pinterest platform to find and ‘pin’ educational materials specific to students with whom they will work with in future inclusive classrooms, relative to the various categories of special education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology Enhancing the Skills of Students with Disabilities)
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Open AccessArticle Enhancing Pre-Service Special Educator Preparation through Combined Use of Virtual Simulation and Instructional Coaching
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8010010
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 7 January 2018 / Accepted: 9 January 2018 / Published: 11 January 2018
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Abstract
To meet the ever-increasing teaching standards, pre-service special educators need extensive and advanced opportunities for pedagogical preparation prior to entering the classroom. Providing opportunities for pre-service special educators to practice such strategies within a virtual simulation environment offers teacher preparation programs a way
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To meet the ever-increasing teaching standards, pre-service special educators need extensive and advanced opportunities for pedagogical preparation prior to entering the classroom. Providing opportunities for pre-service special educators to practice such strategies within a virtual simulation environment offers teacher preparation programs a way to individualize the teaching and practice of various pedagogical aspects needed when new educators enter their first classroom. Coupling such simulations with specific instructional coaching allows for increased and individualized remediation of the way instruction is given, classroom management practices, or getting to know your student population. This exploratory case study investigated the extent to which virtual simulations combined with instructional coaching impacted the way pre-service educators learned how to provide opportunities to respond (OTR) to the avatar students through the repeated teaching of a lesson over four sessions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology Enhancing the Skills of Students with Disabilities)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Stay in the Box! Embedded Assistive Technology Improves Access for Students with Disabilities
Educ. Sci. 2017, 7(4), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7040082
Received: 12 September 2017 / Revised: 31 October 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 8 November 2017
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Abstract
Assistive technology is not only a required component of a student’s IEP; it can be an effective way to help students with (and without) disabilities access their education and to provide them with required instructional accommodations. Teachers, however, are often not adequately prepared
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Assistive technology is not only a required component of a student’s IEP; it can be an effective way to help students with (and without) disabilities access their education and to provide them with required instructional accommodations. Teachers, however, are often not adequately prepared in their pre-service course work and ongoing professional development to address the technology needs of their special education students and have not had the opportunities to access technology due to limited availability and cost. While assistive technology can be purchased to augment an existing computer, it is often unnecessary to do that. Both Microsoft and Apple operating systems in “off-the-shelf” computers and handheld devices have embedded assistive technology that is easy to access and easy to use. This embedded technology can help teachers become familiar with technology and assist students with sensory, physical, learning, and attention disabilities, and it might have practical applications with Universal Design for Learning. This paper provides a discussion on how embedded technology can support students with disabilities in the school setting and provides examples for access and use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology Enhancing the Skills of Students with Disabilities)

Review

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Open AccessReview The Use of Technology to Assist School-Aged Students with High Incidence Special Needs in Reading
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(2), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8020061
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 14 April 2018 / Accepted: 16 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
This paper delineates some of the ways students with high incidence special needs are currently being served with technology in the United States in K–12 to learn skills or accomplish tasks related to reading. Categories examined were read aloud tools, computer applications, traditional
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This paper delineates some of the ways students with high incidence special needs are currently being served with technology in the United States in K–12 to learn skills or accomplish tasks related to reading. Categories examined were read aloud tools, computer applications, traditional instructional methods that utilized technology, and online instructional environments. The categories examined in online instructional environments include the prevalence of students with special needs, how Individual Education Plan requirements, such as accommodations and modifications, are being addressed, parental participation, and concerns in the online environments. Suggestions for future work at the intersection of reading technology and teachers of students with special needs are included, as well as conclusions from the current work. Future work with teachers of students with special needs is required to help better serve their unique learning requirements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology Enhancing the Skills of Students with Disabilities)

Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper Designing and Implementing an Assistive Technology Lab for Postsecondary Education
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8010011
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 29 December 2017 / Accepted: 9 January 2018 / Published: 11 January 2018
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Abstract
A literature review discusses how teacher knowledge of assistive technology significantly impacts student success with assistive technology and that many teachers enter the field feeling unprepared to implement these technologies with students. This article explores one university’s process in setting up an assistive
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A literature review discusses how teacher knowledge of assistive technology significantly impacts student success with assistive technology and that many teachers enter the field feeling unprepared to implement these technologies with students. This article explores one university’s process in setting up an assistive technology laboratory for students to explore. Such experiential learning opportunities are vital to the success of special education educators. This paper explores how the lab is set up and the activities visitors complete to provide a foundation for those looking to develop a similar lab. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology Enhancing the Skills of Students with Disabilities)
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