Special Issue "Pollution and Economic Development"

A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lin Zhang

School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Website | E-Mail
Interests: energy and environmental economics; efficiency and productivity analysis; energy policy; applied economics; computable general equilibrium modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We welcome submissions of papers from all areas of economics, with an emphasis on exploring the interactions among environment, pollutions and economic development. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: Productivity development and pollution, structural transformation and pollution, green growth and pollution, the growth dividend from promoting environmental policy, pollution and economic growth in emerging economies, sustainable growth, the government’s role in growth and pollution reduction in emerging economies, new normal growth, and pollution in China. We welcome the submission of articles based on original theoretical and/or empirical research, analytical survey papers and policy-oriented think pieces.

Prof. Dr. Lin Zhang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Economies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Does Foreign Direct Investment Improve Inclusive Green Growth? Empirical Evidence from China
Received: 26 May 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 2 August 2018
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Abstract
Inclusive green growth is a sustainable development mode in pursuit of economic growth, social equity, and environmental protection. At present, a large number of articles have discussed the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic growth, green growth, and inclusive growth. However,
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Inclusive green growth is a sustainable development mode in pursuit of economic growth, social equity, and environmental protection. At present, a large number of articles have discussed the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic growth, green growth, and inclusive growth. However, the research about inclusive green growth is mainly descriptive. This paper constructs China’s inclusive green growth index and analyzes the impact of FDI on inclusive green growth in China. Specifically, by constructing a super efficiency slacks-based measure model (which has two undesirable outputs: income disparity and environmental pollution) to calculate the Inclusive green growth index, this paper compares and analyses the differences and regional characteristics of China’s total factor productivity, inclusive total factor productivity, green total factor productivity, and inclusive green total factor productivity. We find that total factor productivity is decreasing after considering undesirable output, and the traditional total factor productivity is higher than the inclusive green total factor productivity by 0.112; at the regional level, the trend of the total factor productivity is gradually decreasing from east to west, which indicates that there are regional differences in inclusive green growth of China, and there is room for improvement. Meanwhile, we construct a panel vector autoregressive model (PVAR) and use generalized impulse response function and variance decomposition to analyse the influence of FDI on China’s inclusive green total factor productivity. The results show that FDI is beneficial to the promotion of inclusive green total factor productivity in China, and environmental pollution in the FDI process is an important factor hindering the inclusive green total factor productivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution and Economic Development)
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Open AccessArticle The Environmental Consequences of Growth: Empirical Evidence from the Republic of Kazakhstan
Received: 8 November 2017 / Revised: 24 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 19 March 2018
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Abstract
The main objective of this paper is to examine the effect growth has on CO2 emissions in Kazakhstan, controlling for energy consumption, in the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) cointegration framework. We find that the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis seems to hold
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The main objective of this paper is to examine the effect growth has on CO2 emissions in Kazakhstan, controlling for energy consumption, in the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) cointegration framework. We find that the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis seems to hold for Kazakhstan; this effect at a low level of income increases CO2 but at a high level decreases it. We also find that energy consumption increases CO2 emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution and Economic Development)
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Open AccessArticle Non-trivial Factors as Determinants of the Environmental Taxation Revenues in 27 EU Countries
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 8 January 2018 / Accepted: 12 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
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Abstract
The implementation of environmental taxation is one of the most important issues of environmental policy in Europe. To approach this matter, the paper aims to analyse the determinants of environmental taxation revenue for European countries. Besides investigating the most explored determinants, such as
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The implementation of environmental taxation is one of the most important issues of environmental policy in Europe. To approach this matter, the paper aims to analyse the determinants of environmental taxation revenue for European countries. Besides investigating the most explored determinants, such as those related to production, consumption and environmental quality, particular attention is paid to some non-trivial factors. Firstly, we analyse the importance of the institutional context that is crucial for policy enforcement. Secondly, we consider the consumption of rapidly obsolescent goods, such as information and communication technology (ICT) goods characterised by intensive waste generation. Finally, the importation of final goods as a consequence of production offshoring is taken into account. The results demonstrate that the above-mentioned determinants have a heterogeneous impact on environmental taxation revenue in EU Western countries and EU Eastern countries, which can be due to a still weak institutional context of the latter economies and their peculiar patterns of development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution and Economic Development)
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Open AccessArticle Is There a Limit to Growth? Comparing the Environmental Cost of an Airport’s Operations with Its Economic Benefit
Received: 25 July 2017 / Revised: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 14 November 2017
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Abstract
With the growing global awareness of the requirement for sustainable development, economic development is no longer the sole objective of business activities. The need to find a balance between environmental impacts and economic benefits is especially the case for airport operations in or
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With the growing global awareness of the requirement for sustainable development, economic development is no longer the sole objective of business activities. The need to find a balance between environmental impacts and economic benefits is especially the case for airport operations in or around cities. This study measured the environmental costs and economic benefits and of an airport for a period of 10 years, using Taipei Songshan Airport for the empirical analysis, to examine whether the environmental costs could outweigh the economic benefits. Of all the environmental negative side effects, aircraft engine emissions and noise nuisance are considered the main sources of environmental impacts. The dose-response method and the hedonic price method, respectively, were used for estimating the social costs of these. Income generation from both direct and secondary employment is measured as economic benefits by applying the Garin-Lowry model, originally developed in 1966, for estimation of the employment multiplier. The results show that, in general, the operation of Taipei Songshan Airport brought more economic benefits than environmental costs. The sensitivity analysis of emissions and noise social cost parameters shows that the environmental costs might have exceeded the economic benefits in 2008 and 2009 in certain high emissions and noise social cost cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution and Economic Development)
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