Special Issue "Innovation and Economic Development"

A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tsutomu Harada

Graduate School of Business Administration, Kobe University, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: innovation; technological change; economic growth; inter-sectoral growth

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue presents a collection of papers that contribute to one of the most important contemporary economic questions, i.e., innovation and its impact on economic development. Although substantial attention has been paid to the economic mechanism of innovation and its effects on economic growth, many unexplored issued remain regarding the relationship between innovation and economic development or economic growth with structural change. The papers can be theoretical or empirical, and the approach can be based on case studies, comparative or institutional analysis, theoretical contributions, historical perspective or empirical work, among others. Papers from different schools of thought may also be accepted.

Prof. Dr. Tsutomu Harada
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Economies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Estimating the Effects of Human Capital Constraints on Innovation in the Caribbean
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 18 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
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Abstract
Human capital, as reflected in education levels and skills, and innovation is an important engine of economic growth. The Caribbean is deficient in both: lower than expected GDP growth rates are accompanied by relatively low innovation at the firm level, and the workforce
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Human capital, as reflected in education levels and skills, and innovation is an important engine of economic growth. The Caribbean is deficient in both: lower than expected GDP growth rates are accompanied by relatively low innovation at the firm level, and the workforce is characterised by skills deficiencies and educational mismatches. In that regard, this paper exploits firm-level data covering 13 Caribbean countries to examine the extent to which innovation, a key driver of productivity growth, is affected by firms’ inability to find appropriately educated and skilled workers to fill key positions in its organizational structure, which is estimated using Probit models distinguishing between past and future innovation decisions. The econometric analysis finds that firms that have difficulty finding new skilled employees are less likely to engage in any type of innovation compared to those that can, and this is also true for decisions about future technological and non-technological innovations. Moreover, firms that face challenges finding employees with the required core and job-related skills at the managerial and professional levels are also less likely to innovate. Finally, while in-firm training is found to increase the probability of innovation, its magnitude is low. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation and Economic Development)
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Open AccessArticle Do Technological Innovations Affect Unemployment? Some Empirical Evidence from European Countries
Received: 16 October 2017 / Revised: 25 November 2017 / Accepted: 28 November 2017 / Published: 7 December 2017
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Abstract
This paper analyses theoretical and empirical scientific literature about the impact of technological innovations on unemployment, considering the former as a key driver of long-term productivity and economic growth. Using panel data from 25 European countries for the period of 2000–2012, we aim
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This paper analyses theoretical and empirical scientific literature about the impact of technological innovations on unemployment, considering the former as a key driver of long-term productivity and economic growth. Using panel data from 25 European countries for the period of 2000–2012, we aim to examine whether technological innovations affect unemployment. We used triadic patent families per million inhabitants as our main proxy for technological innovations, as well as other unemployment controls, in our model, which were estimated using System Generalized Method of Moments (SGMM). Finding no significant relationship between technological innovations and unemployment in our base estimation, we re-estimated it testing the impact with a time lag as well as using alternative proxies for technological innovations. Overall, the research estimations do not suggest that technological innovations have an effect on unemployment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation and Economic Development)
Open AccessArticle A Firm-Level Investigation of Innovation in the Caribbean: A Comparison of Manufacturing and Service Firms
Received: 3 May 2017 / Revised: 9 August 2017 / Accepted: 25 August 2017 / Published: 12 September 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1258 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A lack of growth remains a major concern for Caribbean countries. Private sector development has been identified as vital in addressing this problem. Innovation, a necessary condition for competitiveness, is a key channel through which the private sector can help to stimulate growth.
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A lack of growth remains a major concern for Caribbean countries. Private sector development has been identified as vital in addressing this problem. Innovation, a necessary condition for competitiveness, is a key channel through which the private sector can help to stimulate growth. An analysis of innovation at the firm level for Caribbean manufacturing and services sectors shows that patent rights, the level of domestic sales, collaboration for innovation purposes, innovation intensity (that is, the efficiency with which innovation funds are managed), availability of technology, knowledge about new market trends, domestic sales, and the size of the workforce are critical to the innovation process in both sectors. Several differences also exist. Innovative service firms are older, in contrast to manufacturing firms, which tend to be younger; foreign ownership is key for service firms; and both types of firms face different obstacles to innovation. Policymakers should tailor policies that take such differences into account. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation and Economic Development)
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